GRANT, J, 1820

National Archives, Kew, CO48/52, 350

Tain

6th January 1820

Sir,

I have been honoured by your letter of the 30th December 1819 and in answer beg to acquaint you that I think I shall be able in the course of [6?] days to furnish you with the lists and that the people will be ready immediately. I have been prevented having any communication with the people since November and the reports propagated by persons in the country hostile to the measure has had a sensible effect on the superstition of those people always ready to be believed. I have not learnt the decision on my case of HRH the Commander in Chief from the military authorities, therefore cannot leave Tain until I do, but have written to the different places to have the lists filled up. I should have been happy had you informed me of the latest time the transports are allowed to sail this season.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your most obedient humble servant

J GRANT

[Note from GOULBURN] Has not this been settled

 

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National Archives, Kew, CO48/52, 362

Tain

13th January 1820

Sir,

On receipt of your letter of the 30th December 1819 I wrote off to the different gentlemen who had promised to accompany me to the Cape, in answer find in some of the districts the people have been allowed to continue on their farms and in others are in expectation of the same indulgence. Agents inimical to the undertaking have poisoned the people against me stating I had been guilty of a heinous offence and the Government would not allow me to proceed and from the restrictions imposed on me I had no opportunity of contradicting them. The decision of His Royal Highness the Commander in Chief on my case has not yet been made known to me but from a letter until it is I am not allowed to leave this [place] and as far as I can learn I am sorry to be under the necessity of informing you not more than fifty can get ready this season, and from the severity of the weather there can be but little communication with the inland county even if I were at liberty to [meet anyone?] there. I am much grieved to find an undertaking which has cost me much labour and expence blasted by a most foul attempt to ruin me, and I am more sorry to believe may interfere with my future prospects. The pensioners with few exceptions are called into service in the Veterans. Should there be room in any of the vessels the number stated could be readily got together, being principally in this neighbourhood.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your most obedient servant

J. GRANT

[Note from GOULBURN across corner of second page]

Under the circs. Stated Ld B concurs with him in opinion that it would be better to defer any embarkation of settlers from this part of Scotland more especially as the season is now so far advanced that there is but little hope of persons who may now embark arriving at the Cape sufficiently early to avail themselves of the planting season.

 

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National Archives, Kew, CO48/52, 372

No.22 Upper Lisson Street

Edgeware Road

23rd March 1820

Sir,

Your letter of the 7th was forwarded from Tain and was received this day, covering a memorial from certain persons of East Ross. In reply I beg leave to state for the information of Lord BATHURST that I only left Tain on the 10th and had not heard of any discontent existing against me by the persons subscribing the memorial.

In the notices issued I never stated myself to be an Agent of Government as the bills will testify, but was desirous to emigrate on the terms of the Government circular if I could procure a sufficient number to accompany me.

The long continuance of the restriction imposed on me by orders of HRH the Commander in Chief in consequence of the complaint by Ens'n SUTHERLAND, which on investigation was satisfactorily explained, caused many to withdraw their confidence and from the advance of the season I suggested the propriety of defering to the next, offering to any on their making the deposit to apply for shipping, which was declined, prefering to wait.

Only two of the persons signing had the means of making the deposit, namely ROBERTSON and BREWSTER, who are both in employ. POLSON was called into service as a pensioner, the others are young men working as before and none has property to dispose of as can be satisfactorily proved and are not likely to become a burden on the parishes. I am the only person who has suffered. I shall be happy to render further information necessary. The memorial is returned as required.

I have the honor to be Sir your most obed't servant

J. GRANT

[Note from GOULBURN]

Acquaint the memorialists that their memorial having been referred to captain GRANT he has in reply satisfied Lord B that great part of the statement contained in it with respect to him is incorrect, but without entering into detail upon their points Lord B has directed me to acquaint them that he proposes [edge of page cut – no?] means of affording them any relief

 

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[Transcriber's note: The memorial referred to is filed under R for ROBERTSON in CO48/53 and copied below]

National Archives, Kew, CO48/53, 255

The petition of the undersigned inhabitants of East Ross to the Rt Hon'ble Lord BATHURST one of His Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State

Humbly sheweth

That the case of your petitioners is one of unexampled hardship to which they beg with respectful earnestness your Lordships most serious consideration.

In the month of September last Captain GRANT of the 78th Regiment by public advertisement at the church doors and by hand bills invited as many persons of good character as were inclined to emigrate with him to the Cape of Good Hope. He set forth that he was authorised by Government to make this proposal and particularly enjoined those who were willing to accompany him to be quite ready for sailing in the month of November last. We the undersigned, allured by the advantages held out to us, and relying with perfect confidence on the representations of Captain GRANT as a Government Agent, sold nearly all our property and made every preparation for the voyage, and were quite ready to fulfil our part of the terms prescribed by Government. We had now discontinued the exercise of our respective trades and were daily in expectation of orders to proceed to the port of Embarkation; but to our great surprise and disappointment we were informed that we were not to sail until December. We have been since that time amused by similar representations: till at last captain GRANT has informed us that we may proceed to the Cape as we best can as he does not intend to go there till next November.

We are in the most destitute situation, having disposed of all our property, and having been obliged to subsist since November on the little money we made by the sale of our property. Should your Lordship not be good enough to induce Government to afford relief we cannot fail to become a burden on the parishes in which we reside. May it please your Lordship therefore to take our case into your most gracious consideration and grant us what relief to you seems meet.

George ROBERTSON

John McINTOSH

John ROSS

William FORBES

John BROUSTER

Donald ROSS

William CAMERON

Collin McDONALD

John ROSS

Alex DINGWALL

George TAYLOR

John POLSON

 

 

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National Archives, Kew, CO48/52, 376

22 Upper Lisson Street

8th April 1820

Sir,

In further explanation of my letter in answer to the one I had the honour to receive from you dated 7th March, I beg leave to enclose a letter from the Sheriff of Ross and one from Mr. GRANT. A Magistrate covering the depositions of those persons whose names had been affixed to the memorial from East Ross addressed to Lord BATHURST, by which you will perceive several others were added to that paper without the knowledge or consent of the parties and which [paper torn] I trust will remove any unfavourable impressions which otherwise might be entertained against me.

I have the honor to be Sir

Your most obedient servant

J. GRANT

[Note from GOULBURN]

Acknowledge receipt & acqu't him that having submitted these papers to Lord B, Lord B is satisfied that no blame attaches to him in the transaction referred to in the memorial which I had the honor of submitting to him in my former letter

[Enclosed]

Calrossie

29th March 1820

To Captain GRANT

78th Regiment

Sir,

Having been called on by Mrs. GRANT to enquire into the nature of the petition signed by certain individuals intending to have embarked with you for the cape, and addressed to the Right Hon'ble Earl BATHURST, I have on the strictest examination discovered that several of those signatures have been inserted in the petition without the authority of the individuals whose names if I may use the expression appear to have been forged by Alex. DINGWALL, as may be learned from the declaration of thou now handed.

As it appears that the time is rather circumscribed to embark, will get the others examined as to their signatures; from their living at distant parts of the country I must for the present forward he declarations of such as are in the neighbourhood; at the same time I feel perfectly satisfied [obscured] professed in the petition will be found quite groundless, and that you have, as can be ascertained from the [obscured] authority, acted on the most humane and liberal terms with those men whose intentions were to have proceeded along with you to the Cape.

I remain respectfully, Sir

Your most obed't serv't

Wm. GRANT

Magistrate for the Circuit of East Ross

Bayfield

29th day of March 1820

In presence of the Rev'd Mr. William TULLOCH and William GRANT, one of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace, appeared George ROBERTSON House Carpenter who declared that Alex. DINGWALL Carpenter had called on him while at work for the purpose of his meeting him at Invergordon with others who intended to go to the Cape & sign a petition to be presented to Government, but as the said George ROBERTSON could not leave his [work?] he put down his name on a piece of paper; further declared that he sold no part of his effects, or been unemployed in the way of his profession; and in regard to the nature of the petition he is perfectly ignorant. The said George ROBERTSON in consequence of Alex. DINGWALLs application put down, tho' not present, his half brother's name William FORBES Blacksmith along with his own; he sold no part of his effects but was about six weeks only unemployed, all which is truth.

[Signed]

George ROBERTSON

Witnesses:

William TULLOCH

Wm. GRANT JP

John CHISHOLM

School House of Nigg

29th day of March 1820

In presence of the Rev'd William TULLOCH and William GRANT, one of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the County of Ross compeared John ROSS who being examined as to his having signed a petition addressed to the Rt.Hon'ble Earl BATHURST declares that he neither saw or signed any petition and if such advantage had been taken by another it was without his authority or approbation. Declares that no part of his effects were sold in consequence of his engagement & that he has continued constantly employed in the way of his profession as House Carpenter, all which is truth.

[Signed]

John ROSS

Witnesses:

William TULLOCH

Wm. GRANT JP

John CHISHOLM

Arabella's Farm

29th day of March 1820

In presence of Mr. Alex. BAIRD and William GRANT, one of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the County of Ross, compeared John BREWSTER, who being examined declares that he signed no petition or authorised any other to do so, and also states that he has been employed constantly as a day labourer since his engagement for the Cape, all of which is truth

[Signed] John BREWSTER

Witnesses:

Alex BAIRD

Wm. GRANT JP

James MURRAY

 

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National Archives, Kew, CO48/52, 392

22 Upper Lisson Street

Paddington

6th July 1820

Sir,

I find I have been made the dupe of a party who induced me to enter with them in the undertaking of collecting emigrants for the Cape from the Highlands. The symptoms of uneasiness manifested by the people in being obliged to leave their farms, the odium cast on the proprietors in the public prints, added to the general disturbed state of the county induced the greatest number of the heritors to renew the leases of those who were likely to make the most useful part of those forming a new settlement. The consequence has been that I have been deserted and the whole expense of the undertaking has fallen on me. Not suspecting the purity of intention of those connected with me I did not use the precaution of binding them in writing and they now refuse to be at any part of the charge insured by which I find myself under the necessity of selling my commission and I am at a loss to know what to do to support a wife & family of seven children. I am therefore induced to apply to you to solicit some small situation in any of our colonies. I do not by any means make this request from any supposed claims on the Colonial Office but trust your goodness will assist an old [officer?] who has spent the prime of his life in the service of his country in rearing and providing for a numerous young family.

Expecting a favourable answer I have the honor to be, Sir

Your most obed't serv't

J. GRANT

[Note from GOULBURN across bottom of page]

Lord B deeply regrets the difficulties in which he finds himself [illegible] & the more so as he fears the number of prior and equally necessary claims upon his patronage precludes his holding out any hopes of an early recommendation to any appointment.

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