Fort Beaufort Advocate 1864 4 October - December

Saturday, October 1, 1864

MISCELLANEOUS.

RIFLE MATCH. – On Friday last a rifle match came off on the farm Linton Dale, Victoria, between a number of farmers of the neighbourhood. A variety of prizes were shot for, the two most valuable of which were won by a young farmer of this district, G. PEDLAR, as proxy for R. LLOYD and S. ESTMENT. The shooting on all hands was good, when it is remembered that no shot striking the target without a circle two feet in diameter counted for anything. The following is the scoring: -

   

100 yds

200 yds

Total.

1

J. N. van ROOY

6

4

5

2

1

2

20

2

N. ELLIOT

5

2

2

1

1

0

11

3

RAUTENBACH

2

4

4

0

0

0

10

4

ERASMUS

3

5

3

0

2

1

14

5

Hans VILJOEN

2

2

1

4

0

0

9

6

J. D. INGRAM

1

5

3

6

1

4

20

7

I. HARTMAN

5

4

6

4

0

1

20

8

G. K. JACKSON

0

3

5

0

0

3

11

9

G. PEDLAR

4

5

4

4

1

4

22

10

Sergt. CORNE

2

1

2

1

0

0

6

11

J. N. van ROOY

3

6

6

1

0

0

16

12

G. H. NIEUKERK

2

4

2

0

2

3

13

13

Reuben LLOYD

2

4

1

1

6

0

14

14

R. CURRIN

4

5

2

0

0

6

17

15

W. PRESTON

4

3

3

0

0

5

15

16

Isaac HARTMAN

5

3

4

1

2

0

15

17

V. ERASMUS

4

2

5

1

1

1

14

18

Sergt. CORNE

3

5

6

5

1

0

20

19

R. LLOYD (by G. PEDLAR)

5

5

4

2

5

5

26

20

G. van ROOY

5

4

4

0

0

3

16

21

S. ESTMENT (by G. PEDLAR)

4

5

4

4

5

2

24

22

M. INGRAM

5

5

2

1

2

3

16 [18]

23

A. DAVIES

0

2

0

0

0

0

2

24

J. A. NIEUKERK

2

3

2

0

0

0

8 [7]

25

WHEELER

3

3

6

0

3

2

17

After shooting off the ties, the distribution of the prizes was as follows: -

R. LLOYD

Slaughter Ox

£

9

 

S. ESTMENT

Cow

 

8

 

Van ROOY

Gold Chain

 

5

 

G. PEDLAR

Saddle and Bridle

 

4

10

J. HARTMAN

2 Kapater Bucks

 

1

10

Sergt. CORNE

Cart whip & brow bands

 

1

15

R. CURRIN

Head Stall

 

   

10

WHEELER

Neck strap & chain

   

15

DEPARTURE OF THE C.M. RIFLEMEN. – On Tuesday morning last, the Head Quarters of this regiment marched out of Fort Beaufort for K. W. Town, - the Band playing the “Girl I left behind me,” and others airs, until the men crossed the Brak River drift. The number of men leaving was not above 39 or 40, including the band. Two full troops of the C.M.R., we understand, will be kept here for the present, so that in reality the removal of the Head Quarters, will have little effect beyond depriving the town of the presence of several officers and their families, and the pleasure heretofore derived from the music of the excellent band. Col. TINLEY and several of the officer did not leave until Friday.

DEPUTATION. – On Tuesday afternoon a deputation consisting of L. H. MEURANT, Esq., C.C., R. BOVEY, Esq., R. W.H. GIDDY, Esq., S. W. HAYCRAFT, Esq., and C. HOLLIDAY, Esq., waited upon Col. TINLEY to present him with a numerously and respectably signed address, expressive of the good will entertained by the inhabitants towards himself and the regiment so long quartered here, and of their high sense of the courteous bearing manifested by himself and lady, and the officers of the regiment during their stay in the town. Col. TINLEY expressed to the deputation the pleasure he derived in receiving this mark of respect, and on behalf of Mrs. TINLEY, himself, brother officers and the regiment, reciprocated the kind wishes for their welfare embodied in the address. The two years and a half he had been stationed in Fort Beaufort, the Colonel said had been among the happiest of his life. It is certainly a pleasing reflection, after an intimate intercourse with the inhabitants of upwards of two years which this corps had been stationed in the town, that when the call of duty necessitates the departure of the H. Qrs., the friendships formed remain unabated, and mutual expressions of good feeling and wishes, are reciprocated by the inhabitants and the regiment. The address Col. TINLEY, with his reply will be found in another column.

SALES BY AUCTION. – There have been some extensive furniture sales this week, viz. – that on Monday of effects belonging to officers of the C.M.R. about to leave; and on Tuesday of the household furniture of Mr. S. H. ROBERTS, also about to leave. At both sales, the prices realised were considered very good. The well-known pair of greys belonging to Mr. ROBERTS were purchased by Mr. R.M. ROBERTS of Adelaide, together with a second hand spider, for £120. This was considered a bargain.

MR. DAVIDSON AGAIN. – It is rumoured that large defalcations of stores were discovered on the eve of the removal of the H.Q.C.M. Rifles. – It was necessary that accounts between the regiment and the Commissariat should be squared before the departure of the regiment, and hence the discovery of missing stores. There is a mystery in the affair which has yet to be cleared up, but a Board of Enquiry sat on Monday, and gave their decision on Tuesday. What that is, can only be conjectured as yet, but rumour says that the greater part of the deficiencies, said to be very considerable, are due to the ingenuity of Qr. Master Sergt. DAVIDSON. He appears to have imbued his superiors in the regiment with undoubted confidence in his integrity, and to have abused it, in the same manner as he abused the confidence of the general public.

THE PARLIAMENT IN GRAHAM’s TOWN. - The Illustrated London News received by the Cambrian has an illustration representing the opening of Parliament in the Shaw College in Grahamstown. The picture, we believe, was taken from a photograph which Mr. JAY took the moment the carriage of His Excellency the Governor drew up at the entrance of the College.

MR. B.M. SHEPPERSON has closed his clothing and grocery establishment at Fort Beaufort, conducted under the management of Mr. DICKERSON.

MR. JAMES, formerly Accountant of the London and South African Bank in Cape Town, is now Chief Manager of the Bank in London.

FRAUD AT SWELLENDAM. – A “respectable” farmer names M. MATHER, has been sentenced to three month’s imprisonment with hard labour for having put a quantity of stones into three month’s imprisonment with hard labour for having put a quantity of stones into three cases of aloes to increase their weight.

COM. GEN. DRAKE. – Intelligence arrived by last mail that this officer has retired upon half-pay. We believe he had scarcely resumed his commanding at New Zealand when he was ordered home to England. It is said, also, that the military removel which occurred during his command, instead of saying £30,000 per annum, caused an increase of expension annualy to something like that sum. This, we understand, is the result of official enquiries. – Journal.

KOTZE V. THE SYNOD. – The Rev. A. MURRAY, the moderator of the Synod, last week instructed his attorney to note an appeal against the judgement of the Supreme Court in this case. Mr. MURRAY expects that the decision of the Court in the case of Burgers vs. Synod, which will be tried shortly, will be adverse to the Synod, and as he, in that event, intends to appeal to the Privy Council, he probably thinks that it can do no more to appeal in both cases at the same time. We are warranted to draw this conclusion by a communication which we received from Worcester in the past week, and in which the writer expresses himself in these terms: “Mr. MURRAY this afternoon again dilated on the case of the Rev. KOTZE. He said that it was a trial for our church. He announced to the congregation that shortly another will be brought before the Supreme Court, and that, should the judgement be against the Synod, he would go further, and appeal to the Privy Council.” Our informant was not present in the church when these words were spoken, and should they have been conveyed inaccurately, this must be his excuse.

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS TO COLONEL TINLEY, C.M.R.
Fort Beaufort,
22nd September, 1864.
SIR, - We, the undersigned, inhabitants of the town and district of Fort Beaufort cannot allow you to leave this town without expressing to you our appreciation of the kindness and courtesy which we have always experienced from you and the officers of your regiment during your stay amongst us. We sincerely regret that duty necessitates your departure.
We hope that Mrs. TINLEY may soon be restored to perfect health; and that every good fortune may attend you and your gallant regiment.
We are, Sir,
Your humble servants.
L H MEURANT, CC & RM
Robert BOVEY
R J PAINTER, MP
N MEYER MP
Thomas NILAND
Charles HOLLIDAY
R W H. GIDDY, CP
W H RAWSTORNE
Jno QUIN
A. TWEED
W. ESTMENT jun
Charles MALLET
S W HAYCRAFT
A WRAGG
C L DREYER
James SCOTT M D C
John HOLLIDAY
William STANTON
G G ROUX
W C HENMAN
D MCKAY
H KEYS
H PEDLAR
R. RALPH
Thomas YORK
A FERGUSON
T CUTTER
S H ROBERTS
W R LLOYD
R LLOYD
A C GARDINER
A MACGILLEWIE
J. O’GARA
F GODDARD
J WILLIAMS
S HOWE
Thomas HENDERSON
W EWING
W BROWNING
T HANLEY
Thos HENCHMAN
H C MUNDELL
E MUNDELL
H J BRADY
N ELLIOT
Alex MCCALLUM
G F STOKES
H SPARKS
F GARRETT
J D INGRAM
P T HARRIS
M A ROCHAT
John RORKE
E R DELL.

REPLY.
Fort Beaufort,
27th Sept., 1864.
GENTLEMEN, - It is with great pleasure and gratification I receive your expressions of kindly feeling and good fellowship towards myself brother officers, and regiment. I assure you we fully and heartily reciprocate them, and we have not only been in “accord” with all, but have experienced great kindness and attention. I sincerely thank you for the kind interest you take in my wife’s health and your good wishes for its speedy restoration.
We, one and all, carry away with us feelings of regret at leaving a town where we have passed so many happy days; and can only say that wherever “Fate,” or the Horse Guards may send us, we shall always receive with most cordial welcome any of our Fort Beaufort friends.
Believe me, Gentlemen,
Yours ever sincerely,
R. N. TINLEY,
Col. & Lt. Col. Comdg. Cape
Mounted Riflemen & Garrison.
To L. H. MEURANT, Esq., C.C. & R.M., R. BOVEY, Esq., D. SHERIFF, R.J. PAINTER, Esq., M.P., C. HOLLIDAY, Esq., and other friends,

SUPREME COURT CHAMBERS.
Tuesday, September 20.
NETTLETON versus KILPATRICK.
The Attorney-General moved, in the matter of the minor children of the late William KILPATRICK, that the rule nisi, which had been granted, calling upon the respondent to show cause why she should not be removed from her appointment as trustee and guardian of the children of her late husband, and why she should not be prevented from alienating any portion of the estate, without the consent of her co-trustee, the applicant, should now be made absolute. The rule nisi was originally made returnable on the 12th of July, which time was subsequently extended to the 12th of September, and again until today. The allegations contained in the affidavits of the applicant were that the respondent was habitually in a state of intoxication, and had made away with portions of the estate of her late husband, for the proceeds of which she had not accounted.
Mr. COLE, for the respondent, asked that the motion be allowed to stand over to admit of further affidavits being put in, but their Lordships ruled otherwise, and pronounced the rule absolute, with costs out of the joint estate.

POSTSCRIPT.

HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor took his departure from King Williamstown on Monday afternoon, accompanied by Lady WODEHOUSE and Mr. J. RIVERS, A.D.C.

ON THE 14th instant, the farm Elandsfontein, in the District of Beaufort West, belonging to the estate of W. KINNEAR, was sold on the spot for upwards of £6,000 sterling. It is reported there are four purchasers. It is considered one of the finest grazing farms in the division, as far as regards veldt; but the scarcity of water has always been a great drawback. Two twelfths of the Salt River Port and Vley Farm were also sold in the same estate for £2,400.

P. EGAN ESQ. – King William’s Town is about lose a valuable and most respected member of the community in the person of Mr. P. EGAN of the Commissariat department, who leaves this place in a few days for Cape Town. Mr. EGAN has been long and favourably known not only to the local public, but to the inhabitants of the Eastern Frontier generally. By his urbanity and uniform upright and consistent character at Fort Beaufort, where he resided for many years, he commanded the esteem of not alone his superiors in office, but of every class of the inhabitants, and when in the routine of the service he was removed from thence to this command, both the heads of the department and the public hailed his advent with extreme satisfaction – the first, because they knew that in him they would find a most energetic and useful officer and the latter because they felt that Mr. EGAN was a man of sterling worth and would prove an ornament to society. Nor have these expectations been disappointed, for Mr. EGAN has gained for himself a name amongst us which is irreproachable; and will leave this with the regrets of all who knew him, and carry with him the esteem and best wished of every class of the community for the future welfare of both himself and his family. May they have a prosperous voyage to the Cape, a happy sojourn there, and a speedy return to British Kaffraria. – K. W. T. Gazette.

THE WIDOW AND CHILDREN OF WILLIAM BLACKBEARD. – We are informed upon reliable authority that the widow of William BLACKBEARD, who was murdered near Fort Beaufort some months since, is in a position of pecuniary difficulty. Before his death the affairs of her husband had become embarrassed; and the load of forage of the proceeds of the sale of which he was robbed when murdered, had been borrowed to enable him to meet a bill. He had not property, the farm he occupied being rented from the Government. In addition to the expenses of the funeral his widow is liable to pay to the discoverer of the body a reward of £20, and a further sum of £11 to other persons employed in the search. The only property she has are a few oxen, which if sold, would barely suffice to discharge the liabilities incurred in connection with the discovery and interment of the body of her husband; and if they be disposed of for that purpose, she and her six orphan children will be left entirely destitute. Under those circumstances, we are requested to make an appeal to the public on her behalf. Subscriptions received at the Journal Officer and the office of the F.B. Advocate will be duly acknowledged.

CONDITIONAL ORDERS. – Henry BROWN, farmer, of the Gonubie district to be made absolute on the 12th October.

MILITARY. – The head quarters, of or rather the band of the Cape Mounted Rifles march into town about 1 p.m. yesterday from Fort Beaufort, under charge of Acting-Adjudant PASLEY. – Gazette.

Saturday, October 8, 1864

VICTORIA HOTEL, ALICE.
The undersigned begs to inform the public of Victoria, and neighbouring districts, that he has re-opened an Hotel on the premises lately occupied by Mrs. DOONAN, Alice, which he intends to conduct in a style which cannot fail give satisfaction to all who may favor him with their patronage.
Good stabling and forage, and attention to horses, may be relied on, - at moderate charges.
The best wines, spirits, and Malt Liquors in stock.
J. M. Robinson.
Alice, Oct. 7, 1864.

MISCELLANEOUS.

LECTURE. – It will be seen by an advertisement in our front page, that the Rev. Mr. GUARD will deliver a lecture in the Masonic Hall on Wednesday week, at 7 p.m.

THE ELECTION for members for the Divisional Councils throughout the colony, will take place on Wednesday next, the 12th inst.

THE STAMP ACT. – A proclamation in the Gazette fixes the 1st November as the day on which the new Stamp Act will come into operation.

THE WIDOW BLACKBEARD. – In reply to the appeal in our last on behalf of the Widow BLACKBEARD, Mr. J. D. INGRAM, of Linden Dale, and Mr. Louw ERASMUS of Victoria, have sent us 10s. each as their subscription for the relief of the Widow. Any further donations we shall be happy to acknowledge.

PRIZE WOOL. – Mr. NEETHLING’s wool, which took the proze at the Swellendam Show last February, fetched 3s. 1d. per lb. in London, the highest price ever realized for Cape Wool. Eastern Province look out for your laurels.

THE “FRONTIER TIMES.” – Mr. J. G. FRANKLIN, the proprietor and editor of the Frontier Times, for more than 20 years, has announced that that well known paper will no longer appear in a separate form, but be in future incorporated with the Anglo African. It is to be regretted that an old public journalist should at the close of a long career, retire from his arduous labors with so little cause to be grateful for the support accorded him. Mr. FRANKLIN has displayed both literary ability and independence as a journalist; - and we are disposed to attribute his indifferent success less to the want of appreciation of his talents by the public, than to the absence of an aptitude for the details of every-day business in connection with the mechanical department of his journal. MR. FRANKLIN is a most accomplished gentleman and scholar, and independent of his claims on the general public as an able journalist, he has especial claims to the consideration of Grahamstown and the Albany public. The citizens of Grahamstown are indebted to the exercise of his talents as a linguist, musician, and public lecturer; while the electors of Albany ought not to be unmindful that he creditably represented them in several sessions of Parliament, - although on one or two important questions, his views were not exactly in accord with those of the majority of his consituents. If Mr. FRANKLIN has not been fortunate enough to achieve success, he has at least deserved it. In taking his leave of the public; we will allow him to speak for himself as follows: -
In taking his leave, therefore, of the public, As Editor of the Frontier Times – a paper which he established in this city nearly twenty-six years ago, and which he has himself conducted during the whole of that period – he would only in a few words express his sincere regret that his editorial labours should have not been requited with such a measure of support as to give him the slightest encouragement to continue them. And he may, perhaps, be pardoned if he should venture to think that this result is not one to which, after a public career of so long duration, he ought, in the decline of life, to have reasonably anticipated. At Any rate, he can truly say, that he is not conscious of having deservedly forfeited the public support. He has ever employed his pen honestly, without fear, without favour or without prejudice, and to the best of his ability and judgement, to advance the public progress and to promote the material welfare of the country of his adoption, as well as to maintain the general interests of truth, honour, and justice. “His friends will perhaps think that in these words of farewell, he might have said something about himself in reference to claims, other than as a public writer which should have commended him to the countenance of a generous public. But let such matters pass: at present, he only desires to return his sincere and heartfelt thanks to those kind friends who at all times, and to the last, have afforded him their unwaveringly generous sympathy and support.”

DEPARTURE EMIGRANTS FOR NEW ZEALAND. – On Tuesday afternoon, the Alfred, Capt. DECKER, left Table Bay with another load of emigrants for New Zealand. The vessel was fitted up with every comfort and convenience by Mr. BERG, and met with the entire approval of the Hon. MR. FIELD, emigration agent. The number of emigrants on board was 251 souls. They were several cabin passengers, and thirty-four working men who paid their own steerage passage. The emigrants were chiefly railway labourers and navvies. Of the emigrants there are 98 English, 33 Scotch, 102 Irish, and 16 foreigners.

BANKRUPTCY COURT. – Insolvent estates placed under sequestration in the hand of the Master of the Supreme Court: September 28, -
David PAXTON of Schaapkraalhoek, in the division of Cradock; assets, £299; liabilities, £103 18s 6d; deficiency, £104 18s 6d.
Carel Frederick POHL, of the division of Bedford, Sheep-farmer; assets, £1,126 3s; liabilities, £1,347; deficiency, £220 17s.

REFUSAL TO SURRENDER. – The Circuit court just held at George was petitioned for the surrender of the estate of Jury HUMAN. His Lordship remarked that it was a nation in this colony that people must just surrender in order to get rid of their debts. He called Mr. HUMAN, and asked what was his object in surrendering? Mr. HUMAN replied that he wished to be rehabilitated. Surrender refused.

OBITUARY. – Mr. George MOIR, a comparative stranger arrived in town a day or two ago to obtain a medical aid as he was suffering from an affection of the throat, but we regret to hear he died this morning at 5 o’clock. Mr. MOIR was a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, and was well connected – his father holding an important situation in the Registrar’s office, Edinburgh. We believe MOIR is “A Stranger in a Strange Land,” not having a relative in the country. The funeral moves from STUBB’s Hotel this afternoon at half past four o’clock. – Free Press.

QUEEN’S TOWN. – Preliminary Examination of Mr. Robert PRINGLE charged with Forgery. His examination took place yesterday before the Resident Magistrate. Mr. PRINGLE had been out on bail, since he surrendered at Cape Town. Mr. Attor. CORYNDON watched the proceedings on his behalf. Mr. James FILMER was first called, he was shown some of the notes proved in Mr. PRINGLE’s Estate bearing his name. After examination he denied that such notes were signed by him. MR. Thos. FILMORE gave similar testimony as to other of the notes. After some technical evidence had been adduced, the Magistrate committed PRINGLE for trial at the ensuing Circuit Court, either here or at Fort Beaufort, accepting bail for Mr. PRINGLE’s appearance when called on in two securities of £250 each, and Mr. PRINGLE in £500.

POSTSCRIPT.

WIDOW BLACKBEARD.- In addition to the subscriptions for the relief of this widow, acknowledged in another column, we have since received from Mrs. EEDES, of the “Retreat,” Boarding School, Graham’s Town, the sum of one pound, in testimony of her sympathy with the poor widow and her large family.

MR. JUSTICE BELL has been appointed Acting Chief Justice, during the absence of Sir. Wm. HODGES from the colony.

MR. AINSLIE has requested us to state in reply to the enquires of a correspondent, respecting the disposal of the funds collected to pay the defendant’s costs in the suit PAINTER vs. AINSLIE, that the costs of the defendant alone independent of this of the other side, amounted to £73 18s. towards which he has only received £12 6s 6d being expenses returned by witnesses at the trial, and £16 collected, - £15 of which were handed to him by Mr. STANTON, and £1 by Rev. A. van ROOYEN, thus leaving him out of pocket at this moment £44 11s 6d. We think the committee who undertook the subscription have not done their duty, or more that £16 would have been collected of the large amount which it is said was subscribed – on paper. When people post their names to a list of this kind, they should also put their hands in their pockets.

Saturday, October 15, 1864

THE NESTOR of the Cape Press is no more. He expired in Cape Town on the 5th inst. of disease of the heart, it is said, but he had attained a ripe old age. The name of John FAIRBAIRN, although not the most odorous in the nostrils of frontier colonists, will ever be associated in the minds of unprejudiced men with the liberty of the colonial press and public freedom, and with the development of Cape progress from an unpromising germ to the bud of hope. He was in the early days of the colony, (that is some forty years ago) the principal one among the few who then had the talent, integrity, and moral firmness to combat the despotism of times in high places, and clear the way for the succeeding generation to the enjoyment of the rights and privileges which they now possess. Had it not been for John FAIRBAIRN this colony would probably now have been governed by a despotism, neither mild nor tempered with sugar. In taking his stand as the champion of his fellow colonists, John FAIRBAIRN spared no sacrifice within in his power. He became a martyr for the public good. He was a man of cultivated taste, liberal acquirements, and of logical mind. As a public writer, he was unsurpassed in his peculiar style; - and the polished sarcasms and sententious leaders which flowed from his pen while a weekly journalist, were aimed at once at the weak points of his political opponents, and directed to the enlightenment of his readers. His memory will ever be respected by his opponents as well as his admirers. His principal faults may be traced to an excess in those noble qualities which do honor to the human heart. He imbibed views, pleasing in theory to the philanthropist and philosopher, which were confirmed before his experience of the practical gave him an opportunity to modify them; and which perhaps the consciousness of his own mental superiority, and contempt for the opinion of the men around him, only served to strengthen. Thus only can we account for the strong prejudices, amounting to bitterness, which characterized his writings at a certain period of his career, against the settlers. The settlers have forgiven him, the more heartily as he had lived to witness, if not to admit the injustice of his judgement on them. For some years past MR. FAIRBAIRN, has taken no part in public life, beyond the walls of Parliament, - and even from this congenial field, his increasing infirmities warned him to retire when solicited by Swellendam to reoccupy his old post last session. If John FAIRBAIRN was not without faults, he had many virtues; if he did not accomplish all he aimed at as effectually as he ambitioned, he at least effected more than cold have been hoped for from a single arm, and more than has been, or is likely again for a long time to be accomplished by any two men. He was rich in heart and clean of hand; - he despised wealth for itself, and like an unfashionable patriot died poor. If he leaves a family unprovided for – the public is certainly their debtor. In this age of monuments, certainly no colonist better deserved to have his errors oblivioned, and his public virtues commemorated in a suitable way.

MISCELLANEOUS.

THEFTS. – During the last few days several thefts of sheep have occurred in this neighborhood. MR. G. ROUX had 36 sheep stolen at one time, and from the farm of MR. PEDLAR 12 were taken. In neither case has the strictest search been successful in tracing the stolen animals.

THE GROVE. – A number of poplars and other trees have been planted in the grove this week by Mr. MEURANT. About 80 Port Jackson willows, and 50 blue, white, and red gums, are daily expected from the Botanical garden, Graham’s Town.

MR. JOHN BRADFIELD, another old settler of 1820, departed in peace, at Queen’s Town this week. Deceased was formerly a resident of Fort Beaufort, and formed one of the gallant band who repelled the attack by HERMANUS in 1850. He was 71 years of age.

ESTATE OF THE LATE HON. JOSEPH CAWOOD. – The Journal says that “the estate of the late Hon. Joseph CAWOOD has been assigned over to his brother, the Hon. S. CAWOOD, who has passed his promissory notes for the claims against it at 10s. in the £. Several of the creditors were disposed to hold out with the expectation of getting full settlement, but this would have resulted in throwing the estate into the Master’s hands, and lessening by a considerable sum the amount which the assignee has agreed to pay. We consider the offer made by Mr. S. CAWOOD a very liberal one, as very few would take over so large a liability with only a slender prospect of coming out unscathed.”

A GOOD EXAMPLE. – We hear that a Dutch lady yesterday presented her husband with three fine boys. Two of our Medical Gentlemen were in attendance, and we are glad to hear mother and children are doing well. If our young people will only follow this very good example, we shall not need many more votes for the encouragement of Immigration. – Free Press.

THE MAGISTRATE’S OFFICE AT PORT ELIZABETH. – Since the departure of Mr. A. C. WYLDE – says a Bay contemporary – the office of Clerk of the Peace has been entirely abolished. Although this increased the duties of the Magistrate and his assistants, the arrangements made are so satisfactory that the public suffer no inconvenience whatever by the change. The offices of messenger of the court and chief constable have been separated, and Mr. BROWN will fill the situation of messenger of the court only. The situation of chief constable has not yet been filled up. This alteration is made in consequence of the increased duties rendering it quite impossible for one person to fill both situations satisfactorily. – Great Eastern.
SEYMOUR – STOCKENSTROM.
(Communicated.)
There has been uncommon excitement here for some days, which increased as the time drew nigh for the election of members of Divisional Council. Last week a number of public spirited men formed themselves into a committee for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of the act by securing the return of fit and proper men. A meeting was called in the town hall, on Monday (cheerfully granted for the occasion by the Municipal Commissioners,) with the object of nominating suitable candidates. Mr. W. H. BATES being called to the chair, explained in a lucid manner the purpose of the meeting, and urged the necessity of acting with unity, in order to carry out effectually the privileges which the Act conferred on electors. The candidates named will be found below. Every man polled, excepting three or four unavoidably absent. At the close of the poll the result was found to be as follows: -
W. H. BATES,         71 votes
J. DURANDT,         44     “
T. B. CULLINAN,   43     “
Klaas WEYMERS,  24     “
Gasper OLIVIER,  18      “
James SCOLLIN,    8      “
The three candidates with the highest numbers were of course duly elected as the representatives of No. 1 ward, - who the members are that have been returned for the other wards, is not yet known. I think the public here have reason to congratulate themselves upon having selected men whose hands their interests will be safe. I never saw more interest shown in my public matter than was exhibited on this occasion.

POSTSCRIPT.

WIDOW BLACKBEARD. – We beg to acknowledge the receipt of a check from H. SPARKS, Esq., for £3 for the relief of this bereaved widow.

DIVISIONAL COUNCIL. – The election in Fort Beaufort excited very little interest – four candidates were nominated for ward No. 1 – those returned are Messrs. W. ESTMENT, J. SCOTT, and J. QUIN. – In Adelaide and Kroome the contest was rather spirited. – In the former Mr. H. SPARKSis the successful candidate, - and in the latter MR. John KING. Mr. W. AINSLIE has returned for Blinkwater; and Mr. G. W. AYTON for Koonap. In the Winterberg Mr. A. SIMS, has been elected.

THERE IS SOME TALK of the Commander-of-the-Forces, ordering the re-occupation of the military at Fort Brown and Koonap. The 96th Regt. from China is expected, head quarters to be stationed in Fort Beaufort.

A GENERAL COURT OF ENQUIRY is expected to sit in a few days on the matter of the deiciency in the stores reported a week or two ago.

Mr. A. G. BAIN is among the passengers from England by the Saxon.

INSOLVENT MEETING. – The third meeting the insolvent Esatate of Ben SOLOMON was held before the Resident Magistrate yesterday, at which claims were filed amounting to £5,186,2s 7s., of which £1,657 6s 8d were preferent. The total proved up to the present time is £7,454 6s 4d., - the total of preferent claims being £2.031 6s 8d. From Trustee’s Report, which was adopted, it appeared that the property in the estate would in all probability not suffice to cover preferent claims. The insolvent was not present, - not having, he alleged, means to pay the expenses of the journey from Aberdeen. The report and proceedings will be published in our next. It was decidede that the landed property be sold at a credit of 6, 12, 18, & 24 months.

RUMOURS says that many young men in King Wms. Town are desirous of emigrating to New Zealand, and that an attempt will soon be made by them to get a vessel chartered to sail from this port. Ibid.

WIDOW BLACKBEARD.
The following subscriptions have been received at this office.

Mrs. EEDES, Retreat, Graham’s Town

£

1

0

0

J. D. INGRAM

 

0

10

0

Louw ERASMUS

 

0

10

0

NOAH D.

 

0

5

0

Mr. H. SPARKS

 

3

0

0

NOTICE.
I Thomas MULLER, of “Argyle,” in the Blinkwater, hereby publicly declare that I know nothing whatever against the character or good name of Mr. Donald MCKAY, of the Blinkwater, - that I hereby retract words made use of by me on the 25th ult., when I charged him with theft; and publicly apologise to him for my conduct on that occasion.
Fort Beaufort, Oct. 4, 1864.

H. E. MCTAGGART
Begs to tender his sincere thanks to the inhabitants of Adelaide, and surrounding districts for their very liberal support during the last four years, while carrying on the business of Bootmaker and Saddler.
H. E. McT. has now to inform them that he is removing into Fort Beaufort, but that the saddlery business has been taken over by his late Foreman, Mr. E. JUBBER, - and that the Boot and Shoe trade will be carried on as heretofore by Mr. Alex. WALTERS, who no doubt will endeavour to please and satisfy all who may favor him with their custom.
All parties indebted to H. E. MCTAGGART are respectfully requested to settle their accounts forthwith to Mr. WALTERS, on the premises.
H. E. MCTAGGART

Saturday, October 22, 1864

MISCELLANEOUS.

SHEEP. – We hear from the Mancazana that the sheep flocks are now thriving amazingly. The wool shorn this year we are informed, is in unusually good condition.

WIDOW BLACKBEARD. – We are glad to see that a liberal response is being made to the appeal on behalf of the poor woman and large family. In another column, will be found acknowledged several subscriptions received during the present week.

BURGLARY. – On Monday night last, the shop of Mr. C. HOLLIDAY was burglariously entered, and goods to the value of about five and twenty pounds stolen. The burglars entered by the window, after forcibly removing the shutters. Among the articles stolen was a piece of silk velvet, - the other things consisted mostly of wearing apparel and soft goods. The drawers were rummaged for money, but luckily only a few three-penny pieces were left in them. Two valuable watches, on the counter escaped the hands of the thieves. A Hottentot woman was found next day in possession of a shawl similar to some in Mr. HOLLIDAY’s store, and from the lame account which she gave of the way she became possessed of it, the police by her means hope to track the thieves.

ALICE DIVISIONAL COUNCIL. – Messrs. J. B. TEMLETT, F. PRIER, and G. MURRAY, were returned for the town ward; and Messrs. NAUDE, ELS, B. WOEST, J. A. HARTMAN, and MORRIS, for the five country wards.

STOCKENSTROM DIVISIONAL COUNCIL. – Messrs. W. H. BATES, T. B. CULLINAN, and J. DURANDT, were elected for Eland’s Post; and Messrs. J. J. van AARDT, W. STANTON. FOURIE, HATTA, and GOOZAR for the country wards.

MR. BAIN. – We regret to learn that Mr. A. G. BAIN, just arrived in the Saxon from his visit to England, is seriously indisposed.

ANOTHER VESSEL FOR NEW ZEALAND. – Mr. BERG has, in addition to the Rekersteig, chartered the Maori (a thousand ton vessel) to convey emigrants to New Zealand this month.

THE NEW COLONIAL SECRETARY. – The Hon. Mr. SOUTHEY has not yet been confirmed by the Home Government in his appointment as Colonial Secretary.

DANGER OF PARAFFINE OIL. – Not long ago Mr. P. de WET and others called the attention of the government and municipality to the danger of allowing the introduction into the city of unrefined paraffine oil. The following dreadful accident will speak for itself: Last Sunday evening the wife of one Adriaanzen, residing in Bloem Street, filled her lamp; her daughter, a girl of 11, came in with a burning candle to light it, but before she had touched it, the oil attracted the flame and exploded with a loud report, and instantly enveloped the poor girl from head to heels in flames. The mother and some other persons at once employed whatever means were possible to extinguish the flames, but only succeeded after the girl had been lamentably burnt. Though in imminent danger, it is hoped that she may recover. The hands of the mother are also much injured. – Zuid Afrikaan.

VISITORS. – Messrs. John and Joseph WOOD, sons of the Hon’ble George WOOD of Grahamstown, accompanied by Mr. G. DONOVAN, of Bethulie, passed through Bloemfontein, en route to Natal, on Thursday last. – Friend.

THE NEW DIVISIONAL COUNCIL. – The voting for the three members of the new Divisional Council of Albany, to represent Grahamstown, took place yesterday, at the residence of Mr. Field-Cornet WEBB. Considerable interest was manifested in the result. At the close, the figures stood thus:
T. F. KING, 193
C. RHODES 135
Geo. WOOD, sen., 114
W. OGILVE, 74
P. AMM 72
W.R. PRYNN 1
The three first-named are, therefore, elected. – Great Eastern.

FLOGGING. – Two men were flogged publickly last week on the markert. A false report was spread that one of the men died afterwards. It has no foundation whatever. VALENTYN the man referred to, was quite fresh and lively in the evening. Strong objections have been expressed by some persons as to the flogging in public being a brutalizing exhibition. We understand it was sodonic under express sanction or direction of the Judge who passed sentence. – Graaff Reinet Herald.

DIVISIONAL COUNCIL. – The election of a fresh Council under the New Act at Graaff Reinet was as follows: -
No. 1 Ward,
J. F. ZIERVOGEL 66
J. H. CLOETE 50
B. J. WILKE 45
P. CARO 37
S. A. PROBART 35

Port Elizabeth. – An election took place on the 12th inst., for members to represent districts Nos. 1 to 6. The following is the return.
No. 1 Mr. G. T. REED,
2 (To be supplied),
3 Mr. J. S. REED,
4 Messrs. JONES, J. H. CLARK, and J. CAWOOD,
5 F. H. EASTES,
6 Mr. E. B. HUGHES.

PEACH TREES IN LOWER ALBANY. – One of our farmers here is planting 10,000 peach trees, in rows 60 feet apart, and intends to cultivate the intermediate spaces with tobacco, cotton &c.

SOMERSET. – Messrs. J. A. van NIEKERK, W. G. JORDAAN and H. C. MALAN have been returned as members for the Somerset Divisional Council. It is confidentially asserted that more votes were polled in Somerset in this election than ever was known before, even in the election for members of Parliament.

THE POST OFFICE INQUIRY. – We (Argus) understand that the report of Messrs. OVERBEEK and BOURNE on the working of the General Post Office has been forwarded to the Government, and that an intimation has been conveyed to the Postmaster-General that he must make good the deficiency which was lately discovered in the chest of the receiving-clerk.

MEETING IN INSOLVENT ESTATE.
The third meeting the Insolvent Estate of Ben. SOLOMON, was held before the Resident-Magistrate, on Friday, the 14th inst. The insolvent was not present. The claims filed at the first meeting were as follows: -
W. C. HUTTON, Mort. Bond, preferent £ 374 0 0
L. E. WIMBLE, 2 drafts, & p.n. 371 2 3
W. ESTMENT, jr., Prom. notes 221 0 8
do do & costs 208 6 4
do do 102 4 6
do do 316 0 8
do 2 prom. notes 353 9 4
The following claims were filed at the third meeting; - after which the Trustee’s Report was read & adopted: - 

J. J. H. STONE,

Bond & Interest preferent,

£

600

0

0

P. C. MASSYN,

Open account

 

377

0

0

Joseph TAYLOR,

Judgement and costs

 

168

29

10

 

Costs preferent

 

10

6

8

Savings Bank,

Mortgage Bond

 

1000

0

0

Insurance

 

25

0

0

 

Costs

 

22

0

0

A. DANKWERT,

Open Account

 

8

14

6

Cornelius COCK,

Open Account

 

2574

6

3

Trustee Ins.

Est. of A. FRANK against Insolvent as Trustee of Est. of A. FRAZER

 

400

0

2

POSTSCRIPT.

BEDFORD. – A correspondent informs us of a sad accident which happened on the Koba River on the night of the 18th. An old man named MEYERS, and his son, with some others who had been attending the Circuit Court, were returning to their homes, and in trying to cross the Koba River, which had been suddenly flooded by a thunder storm, old MEYERS and his son were drowned. The body of the young man was found next morning a long way down the stream, but that of the old man had not yet been discovered. The Judge left Bedford on the 19th for Somerset. The cases at the Circuit were mostly for thefts, and the prisoners received sentences varying from 3 years to less. Two criminals were flogged this morning early on the market place. MEYER’s case for forgery did not come off, the principal witnesses being absent. He is bailed out.

THE PRINCE’S GROVE. – A number of trees of different kinds received from Grahamstown have been planted in the grove this week by Mr. MEURANT, who takes great interest in its improvement. The trees were not of the kind ordered by Mr. M. but rather than lose the season they were planted. Anything that will give us a shade will be acceptable. We understand that Mr. MEURANT intends to pay a visit to Grahamstown for a day or two next week, and as he takes a lively interest in this Grove, we dare say he would gladly take charge of any trees which the generosity of the citizens might prompt them to present. The beautiful gardens about Grahamstown can surely spare us a few young trees, which moreover will be serve us a “living memento” of the donors.

THE 1ST AND 2ND MEETINGS OF CREDITORS in the insolvent estate of James DAVIDSON, will be held before the Resident Magistrate at Alice, on the 28th Oct. and 4th Nov.

QUEEN’S TOWN. – Mr. J. PARKER held a sale of rwo Farms, in the estate of EVANS and Co., on Saturday last. “Rooi Poort,” morgaged to Messrs. TROLLIP & WEBSTER, for £1,500, was knocked down to thise gentlement for £1070. “Shilder Kranz,” mortgaged to Mr. J. LEACH for £500, was bought in by him for £350.

WIDOW BLACKBEARD.
The following subscriptions have been received at this office.

Mrs. EEDES, Retreat, Graham’s Town

£

1

0

0

J. D. INGRAM

 

0

10

0

Louw ERASMUS

 

0

10

0

NOAH D.

 

0

5

0

Mr. H. SPARKS

 

3

0

0

John WHITFIELD

 

0

10

0

Mrs. H. T. LLOYD, sen.

 

1

0

0

A. MACGILLEWIE

 

0

5

0

F. GODDARD

 

0

5

0

C. HOLLIDAY

 

0

10

0

W. ESTMENT, jun.

 

0

10

0

S. W. H.

 

0

10

0

C. MALLETT

 

0

10

0

Friend

 

0

2

6

J. N. DALTON

 

0

10

0

John BENBOW, M.D.

 

1

1

0

Gideon J. ROUX

 

0

5

0

W. KNIGHT

 

0

5

0

James VIGNE

 

0

5

0

R. W. H. GIDDY

 

0

10

6

Robt. LLOYD

 

0

10

6

T. H. JUDD

 

0

3

0

H. E. MCTAGGART

 

0

3

0

Friend

 

0

5

0

W. H. B.

 

0

2

6

W. R. LLOYD

 

0

10

0

B. WOEST

 

0

5

0

Friend

 

0

2

6

E. COTTERELL

 

0

5

0

Friend

 

0

5

0

Charity (F. H.)

 

5

0

0

N. ELLIOT

 

0

5

0

J. SHAW

 

0

10

6

Friend

 

0

2

6

Friend

 

0

2

6

Friend

 

0

5

0

J. BEGBIE

 

0

10

0

D. MACKAY

 

0

2

6

A. WRAGG

 

0

5

0

D. HUNTER

 

0

5

0

Mary MCKENZIE

 

0

1

0

Helena MCKENZIE

 

0

1

0

Friend

 

0

5

0

A. BREMMER, leaden coffin value

 

2

10

0

P. EGAN

 

0

9

0

Saturday, October 29, 1864

The death of Mr. Andrew Geddes BAIN will be heard of with regret throughout the length and breadth of the Cape colony; and in Europe, where his name and works are not unfamiliar to the scientific world, the news of his demise will excite among his numerous friends a more than passing emotion. Few men have seen more of South African life than the deceased, fewer still have undergone more of the vicissitudes incident to it in its several phases, or have borne them with a better grace. Mr. BAIN commenced his colonial career upwards of forty years ago, and acquired vast experience of the colony and its inhabitants in the successive pursuits of a trader, an explorer, a geologist, and pre-eminently as a road-maker. There is no part of the colony with which he had not an intimate knowledge, and he was equally well acquainted with its inhabitants. In the war of 1835 he served as Captain in the levies; and in 1836, under instructions from Sir B. D’URBAN, commenced the construction of the Queen’s Road, with a portion of the Cape Corps. It was while engaged in this work that deceased was first attracted to the study of Geology, to which science his subsequent discoveries of fossils and his geological researches of South Africa were important contributions. While employed in superintending the construction of this military road, he lighted on the famous Dicynodon, which he transmitted with an interesting report to the Geological Society in London; - and for which he was rewarded by the Society’s gold medal, a vote of thanks, and a purse of two hundred guineas. He subsequently contributed several papers on Geology, which appear in the transactions of the Society, and constructed from personal inspection his famous Geological Map of South Africa, a work of great labor, and of marvellous accuracy, considering that it was in great part the result of the observations of one individual. About 1847, Mr. BAIN entered the civil service of the colony, under the Road Department, his experience and aptitude in road making having recommended him to the notice of the then Colonial Secretary, John MONTAGU. Mitchell’s Pass in the Western Province was one of the first great works which he superintended; and which gained for him the most flattering encomiums from Mr. MONTAGU and others. The next gigantic undertaking was that of the renowned Pass which bears his name – “Bain’s Pass” – a stupendous undertaking for the Cape colony at that time, and one of vast utility to the development of the fertile districts brought into communication with each other, and with the coast, by its means. So highly did Mr. MONTAGU estimate the talents displayed in this work that he insisted on its being named “Bain’s Pass” as a mark of honor to the superintendent. Several other works in the West, including roads and bridges, were carried out under Mr. BAIN. His last great road was that of the Katberg, on which he was engaged when failing health admonished him to suspend his active labors for a time. He earnestly desired to see the Katberg opened for traffic before he retired, but Providence willed otherwise. He, however, has the merit of having overcome the principal, indeed all the difficulties of the Katberg. The road is passable for carts and horsemen, and what remains to be done to open the road to commerce, is but little compared with what has been done. In taking leave of his friends here previous to his late visit to England, it was feared that he would return no more, so broken did his once hale and vigorous constitution appear to be. These forebodings unfortunately were too sadly verified. Mr. BAIN, after the exhilaration of spirits he enjoyed during the first few weeks after landing in England, felt a reaction against which he was unable to hold up. Dropsical symptoms appeared, and acting on the best medical advice he immediately prepared for his return to the colony as the only hope of prolonging his life for a time. He suffered much during the voyage, and but for the extremely mild weather experience during the passage, would probably not have lived to reach the Cape. Mr. BAIN will live long in his works. He will be remembered by all who knew him as a man of great natural ability, of unswerving integrity, and of warm sympathies with his fellow men. As a public servant he had little to be grateful for in the way of official patronage; but his self reliant mind sustained him against the cold shoulder of official snobbism, which on more than one occasion tried to shelve him, and deprive him of the well earned rewards of long and mertuious service.

MURDER OF BLACKBEARD.
Fresh Disclosures.
Another Murder brought to light.
RE-APPREHENSION OF DAMON.
The public interest in the Blackbeard tragedy has been revived, by the disclosures which have this week been voluntarily made by four prisoners, natives, now in jail here awaiting their trial at the ensuing circuit. It will be recollected that on the discovery of BLACKBEARD’s body, suspicion rested on a well known native named DAMON, who was taken into custody where he remained for two or three months, until his wife, or one of them, who had disappeared just after the murder, had been brought back from the Bashee; and every effort made to elicit from other quarters anything that could throw light on the dark transaction. The authorities however, failed to procure satisfactory evidence against DAMON, who was accordingly released from gaol a few weeks ago, and who returned to his abode, with an expressed determination to find the murderer, in order to demonstrate his own innocence. The English, he told a neighbouring farmer, did not know how to ferret out cases of this kind, but he would adopt the native method, and he felt sure he would solve the mystery. The mystery is now, we are glad to say, in a fair way of solution, although not exactly in the way intended by DAMON. On Saturday night last as the gaoler was about to lock up the prisoners, one of them, a Hottentot told him that he had been requested by two Kafir prisoners to inform him that they had something important to communicate, but that they would like all the prisoners to be locked up first. The gaoler had the two Kafirs and the Hottentot brought into a room in the gaol, when they made the startling disclosure, that while DAMON was in custody, he had confessed to them and another Kafir youth that he had murdered BLACKBEARD for his money, detailing the whole of the circumstances with great minuteness. The gaoler, of course informed the Clerk of the Peace of the disclosure, and the latter lost no time in taking the statements of the prisoners, and issuing instructions for the re-apprehension of DAMON, who was found at Ely, and safely lodged in gaol on Monday afternoon. The statement of the three Kafirs, who were examined separately, was to the following effect: - DAMON, one day while in prison informed them that he knew all about BLACKBEARD’s death, that he himself had committed the murder, but that as no one had seen him do it, he knew he could not be found guilty. How he came to commit the deed, and the manner in which he did it was thus: He (DAMON) knew BLACKBEARD well, having formerly served with him in the levies. On the day of the murder he saw BLACKBEARD in HENDERSON’s canteen, where he had begun drinking. He spoke to him, and in the course of conversation, BLACKBEARD pulled out his purse, and DAMON saw there was plenty of money in it, - and he was suddenly seized with a desire of possessing the money. DAMON visited the canteen several times during the day, and on each occasion saw BLACKBEARD. He saw him also at the time he had been placed on the form to sleep. Just before the sun set, DAMON again visited the canteen, and found that BLACKBEARD was about to start after his wagons; whereupon he immediately proceeded on his way home, knowing that BLACKBEARD would have to take the same road. Shortly after passing the Brak River location, BLACKBEARD came up and passed him, but after a little while DAMON re-joined him, and both proceeded along the wagon road until near Ely. At this point DAMON endeavoured to persuade BLACKBEARD to turn off the main road and accompany him to his hut, but BLACKBEARD refused and said he knew the right road after his wagon and would follow it. DAMON then demanded BALCKBEARD’s money, which he refused to deliver, whereupon DAMON struck him on the head with his kerrie and felled him. After BLACKBEARD was down, DAMON seized him by the head and twisted his neck. DAMON next seized the money and stripped the body all to the shirt, burying the money and clothes in a hole close by. DAMON then cooly walked to his hut, and said he had returned from Fort Beaufort. He remained in his hut all the next day, and in the evening he was informed by his wife, who had been out to cut rushes, that two women of a neighboring hut had seen a dead body in the road. He questioned his wife on the matter, and affected to disbelieve the story of the body. He then told his wife he intended to go and look up his horses in the veldt, and caught one horse, which he saddled, and rode off. DAMON, it being then dark, rode to the spot where the body lay, and taking out his knife, cut the neck, and other parts, with the intention of burying the several portions in different places, but finding that it would take him too long to dispose of it in this way, he lifted the body on the horse, and brought it to the hole near the Brak River, where it was subsequently found, saying to himself “I know what the English will say – they’ll think it was done by the Brak River people.” DAMON then informed the three prisoners of the steps which had been subsequently taken, - how he put those in search of the body off the scent, by pretending to guide them in the search, - concluding by expressing his opinion that the English were fools in these matters, - and giving as an instance of his having successfully eluded justice, and account of a murder and robbery that he had committed seven years ago, near the same spot that he killed NLACKBEARD. This man’s name it seems was AUSTEN, a European, who was travelling between Alice and Fort Beaufort.
The above statement is substantially the account of the shocking tragedy given by the three Kafirs, each of them having been examined separately. It is but just to state, that they appeared to have hopes that the information given would prove beneficial to themselves in some way; but before they were allowed to speak, the Clerk of the Peace disabused them of this idea, distinctly telling them that they would still remain in prison and undergo their trial. The Hottentot mentioned above who has corroborated the story of the three Kafirs, was not entrusted by DAMON with the secret; but he accounts for its possession this way. He was one day in the water closet, and saw DAMON and the three Kafirs “konkling,” as the Hottentots say, - upon which he concealed himself, and heard the whole story as given above. He subsequently informed the Kaffirs of what he knew, and that was how they requested him to become their spokesman to the gaoler.

MISCELLANEOUS.

THE LT. GOVERNOR. – His Excellency Sir Percy DOUGLAS, Commander of the Forces, and Lt. Governor, arrived at Alice from K. W. Town on Monday afternoon. On Tuesday he proceeded to the Katberg, and Eland’s Post, and on Wednesday he visited Post Retief and Fort Fordyce. The visit to these places is said to be undertaken to enable His Excellency to form a correct idea of their value as military positions. There are good military buildings both at Eland’s Post and Post Retief, and it is strongly surmised that one or other, if not both, will be re-occupied by troops. The military position at Fort Hare will also be shortly re-garrisoned.

THE KARIEGA ROBBERY. – The Kafir ADONAS has been committed for trial on a charge of forgery. It appears now that the story implicating the three white men, was concocted.

AWFUL DEATH. – On Friday last a Mr. Thomas ANDREWS, of the Stockenstrom District, was returning from Grahamstown with a wagon, and when near the top of the Koonap hill, he got off to speak to a friend. On attempting to jump upon the wagon again, his foot slipped off the disselboom and he fell beneath the wheels, which passed over his breast, killing him on the spot.

COURT OF ENQUIRY. – On Monday last a court of Enquiry, consisting of Col. CHERMSIDES, R. A. President, Asst. Com. Gen. POTGIETER, Major JONES, and Capt. BOYES, membersm commenced an investigation into the discrepency in the accounts and stores, existing between the Commissariat Department, and the Cape Mounted Riflemen. The money value of the deficient stores is said to be about £1000. The investigation arises out of a claim made by the Commissariat Department against the C.M.R. for certain articles which, according to the receipts given on behalf of the regiement, should be in store, but were not, at the time the regiment was removed from this place. The evidence, which is understood to be merely preliminary to ulterior proceedings in the form of Courts Martial, &c. embraced a very wide field. It is said that several civilians have been, or will be cited to elucidate the affair.

PAINFUL CASE. – A very singular and painful case has lately been under examination at the Magistrate’s office. It appears that a colored man, named William KLAAS, a waiter at the Phoenix Hotel, died a week or two since, and on his death bed made a deposition that a few days previously he had been kicked in the lower part of the abdomen by Edward BERRY, a boy of ten years of age, and son of Mr. BERRY, the keeper of the hotel, and it was in consequence of the kick he then received that he was in a dying state. The opinion of the medical gentlemen who attended the deceased, went to show that a blow of some kind had been struck him in that part of the body, and which had hastened, though not caused his death. The boy, however, denies having kicked the man, but states that in playing with him, the man had hurt himself by striking against the corner of a table. This statement was corroborated by other witnesses who further stated that the deceased was under the influence of liquor at the time he fell against the table. The magistrate has committed the boy pending the decision of the Attorney General.

PIERRE LEGGE. – Inquiry having been made, through the acting consul for a Belgian subject named Pierre LEGGE, who was last heard of in September, 1862, when he was serving in the Frontier Mounted Police at Queen’s Town, it is requested that any person possessing information regarding him will forward such intelligence to the Colonial Office.

CRIMINAL SESSION AT CAPE TOWN. – The indictments for the Criminal Sessions which will commence on the 1st November, have been served. There are nineteen cases altogether. The charge of forgery against MARCUS rests on thirty-eight counts. He forged the name and endorsement of Captain ELMSTONE to promissory-notes of the aggregate value of nearly £12,000, about £4000 of which he passed to the late Mr. BLACKBURN, nearly £4950 to Mr. G. W. PILKINGTON, and about £4000 to Messrs. LEWIS and ABRAHAMS, brother Jews. The indictment against ARMSTRONG, the Post-office clerk, rests on two counts, viz, one for embezzling stamps to the amount of £1890, and the other for stealing them.

ONE OF THE SHIPPING CLERKS OF THE ARGUS has been fined a shilling for boarding the mail-steamer before the Port-Captain. The case against the other one was not pressed, the Port-captain having apparently got enough of it. He brough down a hornet’s nest about his own ears.

POSTSCRIPT.

A MEETING OF THE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY will be held at the Yellowwoods on Wednesday next.

“THE INFLUENCE OF EXAMPLE ON CHARACTER,” – a lecture delivered at Keiskamma Hoek by Sergt. W. LANGLEY, 96th Regt., is in type but is crowded out this week.

THE SECOND HORTICULTURAL SHOW held in Grahamstown on Wednesday last, was successful. Mr. C. WATSON, and Mr. SMITH, carried off the principal fruit prizes. Among the specimens of fruits exhibited by Mr. WATSON were some monster citrons, once of which weighed 4lbs 6oz! ! and measured 2 feet round ! ! ! Messrs. J. WOOD, and TUCK, exhibited great variety of plants and flowers.

On Thursday we transmitted to the Widow BLACKBEARD, a check for £22 19s 6d, on account of subscriptions lodged with us for the relief of herself and family.

TELEGRAPH TO GRAHAMSTOWN. – Active preparations are going forward for the establishment of the electric line between this place and Grahamstown via Fort Beaufort, and by the close of the year we may expect to have news flashed up from Cape Town to King Williamstown and East London in the short space of a few seconds. The laying out of the proposed line was commenced on Tuesday last, and the operation of planting the poles will not long be delayed. – Gazette.

ECLIPSE OF THE SUN. – Our readers will bear in mind that an annular eclipse of the sun will take place on Sunday next, which will be partially visible here. It will commence at 5h. 28m. and the greatest phase will occur about 3m. after the sun has set, or at 6h 28.

SALE OF THE “ANTONNIE.” – The sale of the wreck and cargo of this vessel took place at East London yesterday, the hull &c., being knocked down to MR. HERXHEIMER for £53, and the cargo ti various individuals at pretty fair prices.

LIEUT JOHN TAYLOR, of the 56th Regt., who arrived from Cape Town by the Dane, died yesterday morning. He was the son of R. TAYLOR Esq., Resident Magistrate of King William’s Town. An order has been issued for all members of the Port Elizabeth Rifles to turn out this afternoon (Tuesday), at 4 o’clock to attend the funeral. The band to be in attendance. The Funeral is to start from the Phoenix Hotel. – Telegraph.

DEATH OF H. J. P. LE SUEUR, Esq., - We regret having to announce the demise of this gentleman, who has since the first session of Parliament filled the office of Clerk of the House of assembly, in which position he gained for himself the respect of all who came in contact with him. The funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon.

THE LT. GOVERNOR AND STAFF arrived from Eland’s Post yesterday evening. We understand, he does not at present intend to re-garrison either Post Retief or Eland’s Post.

COURT OF ENQUIRY. – The Court of Enquiry is not likely to conclude its labors for some time. Col. TINLEY, and several of the officers of the C.M.R. have been summoned to give evidence in the investigation.

NOTICE.
If Mr. James MILLS does not pay rent on the house formerly occupied by him, at Seymour, within 21 days from date, the furniture left in said house for security will be sold to pay the same, together with expenses.
W. BRADLEY.
Oct. 20, 1864.

WIDOW BLACKBEARD.

Amount received, advertised and remitted to the Widow

£

22

19

6

Work done

 

2

10

0

 

£

25

9

6

Rev. Mr. DORRINGTON

 

0

10

0

Mr. W. STAPLES

 

2

0

0

DIVISIONAL COUNCIL.
Notice is hereby given, that the Pound heretofore held at Clifton in the Winterberg, has been removed by order of the Council to Ox kraal, Winterberg, and that Mr. Benjamin RORKE has been appointed Poundmaster thereof.
By order
W. H. RAWSTORNE.
Sec. Div. Council.
Div. Council Office,
Fort Beaufort, Oct. 21st, 1864.

NOTICE.
DIVISIONAL COUNCIL.
Notice is hereby given, that the following gentlemen have been duly elected to be members of the Divisional Council for the district of Fort Beaufort, - and that the first meeting of the said Council will be held in public Court Room, on Monday, the 5th December,
District No. 1. - W. ESTMENT, jun., J. SCOTT, and John QUIN,
“ 2. - William AINSLIE,
“ 3. - Gilbert W. AYTON,
“ 4. - Henry SPARKS,
“ 5. - Abraham SIMS,
“ 6. - John Wesley KING.
L. H. MEURANT. C.C.
Chairman, D.C.
Civil Com. office,
Fort Beaufort, Oct. 21, 1864.

Saturday, November 5, 1864

FOR SALE OUT OF HAND, (BY A GENTLEMAN INTENDING TO LEAVE THE COLONY,)
All his landed property in the Free State:
The Farm “PALMIETFONTEIN.” District of Kronstadt. This is a fine farm, well watered by three spruits and Fontein. It measures about 6000 acres, and has beautiful pasturage. Kroonstad is considered the best district in the Free State for agriculture, and is equally well adapted for sheep. Terms very liberal.
5 Farms in the Boshoff & Winburg District.
Well watered. Each about 4000 acres in extent.
Enquire at the Fort Beaufort Advocate’s Office, for further particulars.

FOR PRIVATE SALE,
That very valuable property situated in Lushington Valley, now in the occupation of Mrs. SHAW. The main road from Eland’s Post to Alice passed close to the home, which is well situated for a road side inn.
Terms easy to suit purchasers. Apply to – W. H. BATES.
Eland’s Post, Oct. 12, 1864.

TENDERS FOR WATER WORKS.
No satisfactory tends having been received for the works necessary for leading the water from the Kat River into the Township, the Commissioners of the Municipality will receive fresh tenders for the same until 7 p.m. on Tuesday the 15th instant.
Parties tendering will be bound to no particular plan, but will be required to deliver the water from the Kat River at the spot selected for the reservoir near the town (the exact spot may be ascertained by application to Mr. Commissioner SCOTT), at a height of not less than 20 feet above the mean level of the Prince’s Grove; - and further, tenderers must specify the part of the Kat River from which the water will be led out, the route, the mean width and depth of furrow, the means by which it is proposed to cross the intervening gullies, whether by piping, or otherwise, and the material to be used in said crossings, as well as the dimensions thereof. The time required for the completion of the work must be specified, and security will be required for its due performance in a substantial manner.
Any further information required may be obtained on application to the Water Committee.
The Commissioners do not bind themselves to accept the lowest or any tender.
By order
H. J. BRADY, Town Clerk.
Fort Beaufort, Nov 1, 1864.

NOTICE.
List of Licences issued from this Office during the month of October, 1864.
Retail Shop Licences.
Mr. COHEN, Fort Beaufort,
H. E. MCTAGGART, do.
W. H. RAWSTORNE,
Dis. Of Stamps.
Stamp Office,
Fort Beaufort, 1st Nov. 1864.

MISCELLANEOUS.

HIS EXCELLENCY SIR PERCY DOUGLAS held an inspection of barracks, &c. on Saturday morning last, and left the same day for Grahamstown.
THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL has directed that Mr. PRINGLE, who was charged with forgery, shall be tried before the Circuit Judge at Grahamstown, instead of Queenstown or Fort Beaufort.

A LIBERAL CITIZEN. – While Mr. MEURANT, C.C. was down in Grahamstown last week, Mr. Walter SMITH, the well-known aboriculturalist, learning that he was interesting himself in planting and improving the Prince’s Grove here, very generously presented him with one hundred fine young white gum trees. This liberal present is most acceptable, and on behalf of the public of Fort Beaufort, we heartily thank Mr. W. SMITH for a gift which will be appreciated more and more in each succeding year, and serve also, we trust, to keep alive the memory of the generous donor. The trees will be here in a day or two, and the holes being prepared, they will be planted at once.

LAST WEEK a quantity of the “refreshments which had bee provided for the sale of Thornlands, was seized by the Chief Constable, who considered that the sale of several dozens of beer was an infringement of a retail licence. The matter will come before the Magistrate for investigation on Thursday, although we cannot but think that it was rather sharp work to proceed so summarily against a tradesman who has long been known to carry on a large business in the sale of bottled beer, and whose transactions were never before called in question. – Ibid.

RESIDENT MAGISTRATE’S COURT.
Monday, October 29, 1864.
DAMON, a native, looking like a cross between a Fingoe and Mozambique, was brought up for examination, on a charge of murdering William BLACKBEARD, - the evidence against him being his confession to four fellow prisoners, while lately confined in gaol, on the same charge.

POSTSCRIPT,

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR has been pleased to appoint Mr. John TROWBRIDGE to be field-cornet ward of the Upper Blinkwater, in the division of Stockenstrom, in the room of Mr. J. UPTON, resigned.

DEATH OF MR. LEEWNER. – Mr. J. C. LEEWNER, first clerk of the Attorney-General, - a gentleman who was well known in Grahamstown during the first session of Parliament, - died, we regret to say, on the evening of the 25th October.

RICHMOND. – Mr. BRIGGS, late accountant of the L. & S.A. Bank, King Williamstown, has been appointed manager of the new branch of that bank about to be established at Richmond.

WE ARE GLAD to learn that after a very careful and patient investigation, Mr. P. ERASMUS has been fully exonerated from the charge brought against him by the Hottentot servant, alleged to have been sentenced by him in his capacity as Justice of the Peace to penal servitude. Mr. ERASMUS has, we hear, resigned his commission as Justice of the Peace. – Gazette.

DIED at Cape Town, on the 20th October, 1864, Andrew Geddes BAIN, Esq., late inspector of Roads at Katberg, in his 67th year.

NOTICE.
Divisional Council.
Victoria East.
Notice is hereby given in terms of Acts No. 5, of 1855, and No. 11, of 1864, that the following gentlemen have been duly elected as Members of the Divisional Council of Victoria East: -
District No 1 Francis PRIOR, James Brilliant TEMLETT, & George MURRAY
2 Barend WOEST
3 William MORRIS
4 Isaac Abraham HARTMAN
5 Nicholas Jacobus ELS
6 Theunis Johannes NAUDE.
And it is hereby further notified that the first meeting of the said Council will be held in the Court Room, Alice, on the 10th December 1864, at 11 o’clock a.m.
W. F. LIDDLE,
Civil Commissioner.
Civil Commissioner’s Office,
Alice. Nov. 2, 1864.

Saturday, November 12, 1864

FT. BEAUFORT F. IN. T. AND L. I. COMPANY.
In the Insolvent Estate of Ben. SOLOMON of Bedford.
The undersigned in his capacity of Sole Trustee in the above insolvent Estate, will cause to be sold by auction at Bedford, on Monday, 14th November, 1864, at noon, the following Immoveable Property, belonging to the Estate, situated in the town of Bedford: -
1st. – A piece of ground in Market Square, being lot No. 11 in Block F, measuring 100 square roods, with a large and substantially-built store, cottage, and other buildings erected thereon. This property is admirably adapted for a large Boer trade, being commodious, and situated in the very centre of all the traffic of the town. The erf, a very large one, will first be put up in two lots, and afterwards in one lot.
2ndly. – That large, handsome, and well situated cottage, situate in Victoria Prospect, between Porter and Graham Streets, Bedford, at present occupied by Henry HUTTON, Esq., with the ground attached, being lot No. 1 of Block C. This is a very comfortable residence and can always command a good rental.
3rdly. – That valuable piece of freehold land with buildings thereon, (an unfinished cottage, of elegant design,) situate in Maitland Street, between Porter and Stockholm Streets, being lot No. 4 of Block B, measuring 300 square roods.
The purchase money of the foregoing property will be payable in four instalments at 6, 12, 18, & 21 months bearing interest at 6 per cent per annum. Mortgage Bonds to be passed for the two last instalments.
Jno. QUIN, Sole Trustee.
W. ESTMENT, Auctioneer.
Fort Beaufort, Oct. 1, 1864.

FOR PRIVATE SALE.
Those very eligible premises at present occupied by the Fort Beaufort and Victoria Bank. Possession will be given on the 1st November.
For terms, &c., apply to –
Mr. R. W. H. GIDDY.
Fort Beaufort
September 7th, 1864.

MISCELLANEOUS.

CURIOSITIES. – Mr. P. MCGILLEWIE has just returned from a trading expedition to the interior, and brought with him a few souvenirs of his personal adventures in the neighbourhood of the Limpopo. Among these are two magnificent lion skins, the largest that have been seen here, - the head and skin of the water buck, some immense koodoo horns, and the skin of a boa constrictor 15 feet in length.

MR. R. ARDERNE is at present engaged in surveying town lands, a considerable extent of which will shortly be offered to public conpetition, to raise funds for the erection of a Town Hall. There will be some choice town lots well situated for business, and a good many morgen lots along the right bank of the Kat River, prettily sityated, and very choice garden ground.

APPOINTMENT. – Mr. W. H. SHAKESPEARE, as deputy postmaster at Adelaide, division of Fort Beaufort, vice LOUW.

DAVIDSON. – A report has been in circulation here for the last three weeks that DAVIDSON the run-away had been unexpectedly brought to bay, St Helena or some other place on the way hime and that we might expect the pleasure of welcoming him back again. This report we presume, has reached Grahamstown and is probably the basis of the paragraph below from the Great Eastern, the circumstantial details of course being added. There are half a dozen versions of the affair, but we think it will be found that they are purely imaginative.
“THE EXILE’S RETURN. – The distinguished adventurer, DAVIDSON, who put aside his sword for commerce, and keenly speculated himself into a commercial mess, until he flitted from Fort Beaufort, is about to return to enquiring friends at the Cape much sooner than was expected. It is rumoured in town that a letter has arrived, from St Helena informing DAVIDSON’s special friends of the why and wherefore of this sudden and unexpected change of circumstances. The flitting man, on his arrival at St. Helena, found his “better half” too ill to proceed on her voyage, and therefore was compelled to remain behind with her at the island, to obtain medical advice. Before he had another opportunity to get away, the Ariel arrived with copies of the Great Eastern containing information of the “flit,” and DAVIDSON was retained by the St. Helena authorities. This is how the story goes, and it is said he may be expected at Fort Beaufort at the earliest opportunity. The wife is dead. – Great Eastern.

A YOUNG LION AND LIONESS were offered for sale on the Graaff-Reinet market last Monday morning. Only 31s, for the pair was bid, which was declined, the seller wanting £20. The lioness was loose from the cage, but merely held by the neck. The lion appeared rather shy and savage, slinking into the corner of his cage when observed. They were fine young animals about four months old, just in proper disposition for shipment.

VERY HUMANE. – A Mr. ANTHONY, the medical officer of the Rajasthan, an emigrant vessel, was committed for trial at Mauritius for having, when the vessel was approaching the anchorage, thrown overboard a dying man, in order to avoid quarantine!

ARRIVAL OF THE MAIL STEAMER.
The Union Steam Ship Company’s Royal Mail Steamer Athens, F. B. DAVIE, Commander, from Southampton and Plymouth, 6th ultimo, arrived in Table Bay this morning after a splendid passage of 33 days, bringing the English mails to the 6th ultimo.

LIST OF PASSENGERS.

For Algoa Bay: -

Mr. KIDD,

 

Mr. MOSENTHAL,

 

Lieut. SMITH,

 

Mr. LESTER,

 

Mr. SAWTELL.

For Port Natal:

Mr. and Mrs.  BELLANCE and female servant,

 

Mr HENDERSON.

For Capetown:

Mr. HUTTON,

 

Miss HUTTON,

 

Mr. FENWICK,

 

Mr. COATES,

 

Mr. READ,

 

Mrs. HENRY,

 

Master HENRY,

 

Lieut. D. O. STEWART, R.N.,

 

Mrs. BAYNTON,

 

Mr. and Mrs. CRANMER,

 

Mr. HILL,

 

Miss BUTLE,

 

Mr. and Mrs. HARRINGTON,

 

Miss STRACHAU,

 

Mr. DALE,

 

Mrs. BRISTOW and child,

 

Mr. WICHT,

 

Mr. JOSEPH.

POSTSCRIPT.

ARMSTRONG, the post office clerk, has been found guilty of embezzlement, and sentenced to 6 years hard labor. MARENS, at present undergoing a sentence of 5 years for forgery, was convicted of further forgeries to an enormous amount, and sentenced to 9 years hard labor.

Mr. G. MURRAY has been appointed Sole Trustee in the insolvent estate of DAVIDSON.

MAGISTRATE’S COURT. – On Thursday last a civil case was tried which excited considerable interest. Nancy ANDREWS, (widow of Thomas ANDREWS lately killed at the Koonap) appeared by Mr. GIDDY, and complained that Henry Isaac JONES (who was defended by Mr. KNIGHT) had made an exhorbitant overcharge for conveying the body of her late husband from Fort Beaufort to Eland’s Post. £25 was the sum charged by defendant, and paid to him by Mr. O. GARA, acting under a general power from the friends of deceased to defray the necessary charges for conveying the corpse to Eland’s Post, - and plaintiff prayed that defendant might be compelled to refund £18 14s tendering £6 6s as adequate compensation for the services performed. Defendant pleaded the general issue. For the plaintiff Robert CLARK and Alex RUTHERFOORD were called. The first named swore that he had been employed by Mr. BATES to undertake the funeral, followed in the procession, dug the grave, and covered as is, and that his charge amounted to £1 12a 6d, - about one half what he would have charged if the widow of the deceased had been wealthy. He admitted the Plaintiff had brought the pall, and ten or fifteen hatbands from Fort Beaufort, and used them on the funeral, and that he had walked in front as undertaker. The evidence of A. RUTHERFOORD went to corroborate the statement of the proceeding witness and to show that for similar services performed by defendant in the similar case of H. GOOLD, the charge made was £6 6s – and that altogether the expenses of conveying the body of ANDREWS from the Koonap and interring it at Eland’s Post, amounted to £47 – some odd shillings, - the principal items of which were, - Mr. YORK, for making a coffin and bringing the body from FRANCIS’s Hotel, KOONAP, 16 mile, £17 10; - and the charge of £25 made by defendant for conveying the body to Eland’s Post, 32 miles distant. For the defence, defendant himself was called, and swore that he had been engaged by Mr. O’GARA to convey the body in post haste to Eland’s Post, and undertake the funeral, and that he would be paid as an undertaker: - that he had employed a cart, four horses and three men in the work, but that the body was drawn by two horses driven by one man, the other two horses being ridden by himself and another; - and he had paid £3 for the hire of the pall and hatbands used; - and that although he had only received £6 6s for similar services in the case of Mr. GOOLD, he did not consider himself overpaid by £25 in the present instance. Mr. T. YORK, undertaker, was also called for the defence. He proved that his charge for making a coffin only was £10; - that on two occasions he had performed services similar to those of defendant, - that for conveying the body of W. GLASS to Grahamstown, and making a coffin he had received £35; - and that for conveying the body of the murdered man BLACKBEARD to Fort White, his charge was £20 1. The witnesses were closely examined by the agent for defendant. The Magistrate in giving judgement commented severely on the extortion which appeared to be practiced by undertakers generally; and in the present instance in particular he considered the charge exceeded all reason. Taking into account the services rendered and the expenses, time, and labor of plaintiff and his men, as given in evidence, and allowing a fair profit, he considered that a charge of £11 would be ample. He therefore gave judgement was pronounced, defendant expressed in the hearing of the court his dissatisfaction at the decision and his determination not to refund, upon which the magistrate threatened to commit him to gaol for contempt.

SIR WALTER CURRIE has been assaulted by a Kaffir near Bedford, when a severe struggle ensued, Sir Walter conquering with the loss of a portion of his beard and a finger wound. The Kaffir got one month’s imprisonment.

PROGRESS. – The bands of marriage of no less than fifteen couple were published yesterday in the various places of worship in this town, and several others about to follow the same worthy example. – K. W. T. Gazette.

BIRTH, on the 28th October, 1864, at Cathcart Cottage, Eland’s Post, Mrs. J. C. B. BERRANGE, of a Son.

 WIDOW BLACKBEARD.

Amount received, advertised and remitted to the Widow

£

22

19

6

Work done

 

2

10

0

 

£

25

9

6

Rev. Mr. DORRINGTON

 

0

10

0

Mr. W. STAPLES

 

2

0

0

W. SHAKESPEARE

 

2

0

0

W. M.

 

1

0

0

Saturday, November 19, 1864

MISCELLANEOUS.

FISH. – The fishing season has now set in, and the banks of the river are lined with anglers. The mullet this year are larger and fatter than usual.

BEDFORD. – A case is now being investigated here by P. NIGHTINGALE, Esq. C.C. & R.M., which creates some little excitement in this now quiet little place. It is relative to some affidavits made by C. F. POHL, of this district, respecting some strange liberties which he alleges his agent the world-renowned “Master Ben” took with his name. On Monday C. F. POHL was examined by the Magistrate, on oath, and according to his statement it appears that “Master Ben” induced him after some pressing to lend him two accommodation bills for £120 each. Two bills were signed in blank by C. F. POHL, who appeared to have implicit confidence in his agent, but on their reaching maturity, it turned out that each bill had been filled in for £240, just double the amount agreed on. It is but right to observe, that Master Ben’s story has yet to be heard, and it is said he feels so indignant at the imputation on his honor and veracity, that he intends to make his appearance here on the 17th or 18th to confound his aspersers, - that is if his mules do not knock up. – Communicated.

SALE OF LANDED PROPERTY, - The property in the insolvent estate of Ben SOLOMON was sold by the Fort Beaufort Fire Insurance and Trust Company, at Bedford on Monday last, Mr W. ESTMENT being the auctioneer. The prices realized were pronounced by those acquainted with the present state of things at Bedford, to be surprisingly good, although unfortunately for the mortgagees they were not sufficient to cover the preferent bonds. The corner block facing market square, upon which there is a large store, in a dilapidated condition, and several smaller buildings, was sold first in five lots, and put up afterwards in one lot. No bid could be obtained for the whole block, and consequently the bidders in the first instance were declared the purchasers. The lot realized £634. This property was mortgaged to the Savings Bank, Cape Town, for £1000. For a neat cottage and erf neat the bounds of the township, occupied by Mr. H. HUTTON, and mortgaged to Mr. J. J. H. STONE for £600, £210 were bid, at which the trustee refused to sell, but agreed to let it go if £300 were bid, whereupon that sum was offered by and the property knocked down to Mr. NIGHTINGALE, C.C. For the unfurnished cottage of “elegant design,” with ground attached, mortgaged to Mr. C. W. HUTTON for £374, £255 was the highest bid obtainable, at which it was knocked down to Mr. HUTTON, on the condition that he abandoned all claim on the estate for the balance of the bond on the property. The credit was 6, 12, 18, & 24 months. The total amount of the sale was £1189 – the mortgages on the property sold being £1974.

MURDER OF MR. VAN BLERK AND SON. – Some time since Mr. Bastian van BLERK left Colesberg on a trading trip to the interior. We heard some weeks ago that he had been murdered by a Bushman. This was contradicted. By later letters, however, we are sorry to say, the former reports have been confirmed, and there is no longer any doubt that the murder has actually been committed. We extract the following: - Mr. GREAVES hearing that the Bushman was at Mamoussa with Mr. CLARISS, and that he was remaining altogether at liberty, sent Mr. WESTBEECH to Mamoussa, a distance of 36 miles with a Kafir whom he had got from MAHURA to go and make the Bushman prisoner, which they did, and brought him into Town on Wednesday night. On the Thursday morning whilst council was proceeding with the investigation of the case, MANURA as President, Mr. CAMM arrived with Mr. van BLERK’s wagons, and gave such a straightforward evidence, herein annexed, that MAHURA at once sentenced the Bushman to death, which sentence was carried into execution the same afternoon, in presence of Messrs. GREAVES, METTROVIVH, J. STOCKDALE, C. THOMAS, G. WESTBEECH, F. CROCKER, W. CAMM, and D. B. BELL. – Colesberg Advertiser.

ON FRIDAY evening the married men gave a Ball in the Court Room. The place was tastefully decorated, and no expense was spared to make the evening entertainment pass off as pleasantly as possible. – Ibid.

CAPTAIN CROOME, of the 96th Regiment is appointed aide-de-camp to Colonel ARMSTRONG on the staff at the Cape.

ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSION. – On the authority of a private letter, we learn that Dr. ALLARD, the Roman Catholic Bishop of Natal, has been 2½ years among the Basutos, during which time he has built a church, a mission house, a school room, and is now engaged in building a nunnery. In June last, six nuns came out from France to Natal, three of them will remain in Pietermaritzburg, and three will join the Basuto Roman Catholic mission. The Mission station is four hours ride from Thaba Bosigo, and is called Corricorra. The young ladies of Basutoland will now be favoured by receiving a first-class education at a school to be conducted by those highly accomplished French nuns. – Friend.

LATEST NEWS.
FRANZ MULLER is now in London, undergoing his trial for the murder of Mr. BRIGGS. The evidence against him is not conclusive. The coroner’s jury found him guilty of murder.

POSTSCRIPT.

RE-DAVIDSON THE RUNAWAY. – As we expected the story of the capture of DAVIDSON at St. Helena has vanished “like the baseless fabric of a vision, leaving not a wreck behind.” DAVIDSON, however, has been heard of, and his wife, too; both were seen in London on the 4th October. A private letter has been received from a shopkeeper in London, who has a son here in Fort Beaufort, with whom DAVIDSON was intimate, which leaves little doubt as to the fact of the runaway’s safe arrival at home. The shopkeeper was not acquainted with DAVIDSON, and knew nothing of his acts here, but felt interested in a person who knew and could give him an account of his son here in Africa. Here is an extract form the letter, which answers DAVIDSON’s description pretty well: -
“A man came to my shop yesterday (4th Oct.) and bought a coat. He said he came from a warm climate, and it turned out he knew you, and his wife also. He was a short man, and she a stout woman, losing her nose; he called her Sarah.”

Mr. J. C. MONTAGUE is appointed Registrar of Deeds, and Mr. W. H. AURET Civil Commissioner of the Paarl.

IT IS RUMOURED that another large forgery is on the eve of disclosure. The amount is said to be about £2,000.

THE 10th Regiment remains under canvas on the Parade until the 2ns Battalion leaves.

THE TROOPS in New Zealand, with the exception of the 18th, which remains, are under orders to be at home by December, 1865, If more are wanted for the colont, £40 per head must be paid for them per annum.

PUBLIC FLOGGING. – The prisoners sentenced to corporal punishment, by the Judge, underwent their sentence in front of the gaol yesterday morning at 7 a.m.

A BURGLARY was committed at Ely on the night of the 17th. The value of the goods stolen was £15. Mr. JUBBER offers thirty shillings reward for the apprehension of the burglars.

Saturday, November 26, 1864

PUBLIC NOTICE.
Mr. A. J. GOODCHILD, Enrolled Agent, from Whittlesea, begs to inform the inhabitants of the Division of Stockenstrom and the public in general, that he has taken up his residence at Eland’s Post, and intends practising as a Land, Law, General and Commission Agent, and trusts by strict attention to business, combined with moderate charges, to merit a share of public support.
Cases conducted in the Magistrate’s Court, - Goods received and sold on commission, - Accounts collected.
N.B. – All monies collected paid over immediately on receipt.
Eland’s Post, Nov. 24, 1864.

NOTICE.
In the Testate Estate of Margaret Ann van AARDT (born MURRAY) and surviving spouse Theunis Geitze van AARDT.
All persons claiming to be creditors in this Estate are required to file their claims with the undersigned at Frankfort, within six weeks; and all persons indebted to the said Estate are requested to pay the amounts due by them within the same period and at the same place, or legal proceedings will be taken against them.
All persons are hereby warned not to accept the name of Theunis Geitze van AARDT incurring any liability whatever without the approval of the Executor.
Herbert H. BROWNE,
Executor Testamentary.
Frankfort, K. W. Town,
British Kaffraria,
November 10, 1864.

“WHITE HORSE HOTEL.”
F. GODDARD having become proprietor of the above well-known and old-established house of business, begs to inform the Public that he has made considerable alterations in the premises, by which the accommodation has been greatly increased. Travellers and others who may favor him with a call will not only find his Hotel replete with everything the season affords, but the Proprietor will use every means in his power to make the visitor’s stay most comfortable.
F. G. takes this opportunity of returning his thanks to the public for the liberal patronage he has already been favored with, and will use his best exertions to deserve an extension of that support.
Good stabling and an experienced groom always in attendance.
Carts and Horses kept for hire.

MISCELLANEOUS.

INSOLVENCY DECLARED. – Robert Paxton CHURCH, of Somerset East, general agent, assets, £198 13s 2d; liabilities, £908 4s 3d; deficiency, £407 11s 1d.

ALICE CIRCUIT COURT. – The business at the Circuit Court held at Alice on the 18th was very slight. Only three criminal cases, and three civil cases, were tried – the whole being dispatched in a couple of hours. The Judge returned from Alice via Fort Beaufort, for the purpose we believe, of taking advice from Dr. BENBOW as to the complaint under which his lordship is suffering. He found much relief from Dr. BENBOW’s treatment on his arrival here from Queen’s Town.

CAPTURE OF WEBSTOCK. – The alleged forger WEBSTOCK, who tool a hurried departure from Grahamstown last week, as it is stated, on the discovery being made of his having forged Mr. S. ALLISON’s name to a promissory note, which he endeavored to discount with Mr. GOOCH, - was captured by Corporal GILPIN of the Mounted Police on Saturday last, at the Yellowwood Hotel. Great credit is due to Corporal GILPIN for the activity and intelligence with which he traced the fugitive. On leaving Graham’s Town, Corporal GILPIN traced WEBSTOCK along the road in the direction of Committees, where it seems he doubled and made for the Koonap. From thence he was traced into Fort Beaufort, where the Corporal’s horse being knocked up, requested the Magistrate to provide him another, which was at once done, and pursuit was continued immediately to the Yellowwood Hotel on the road to Adelaide. Here the Corporal took his measures cautiously, and before long found that the person he was in search of was in the house. WEBSTOCK had just received an intimation that a detective was on his trail, when Corporal GILPIN, who had been in conversation with him a few minutes for the purpose of assuring himself as to WEBSTOCK’s identity, arrested him, and brought him into gaol here. On Sunday the Corporal proceeded with his prisoner to Graham’s Town.

YESTERDAY a young man named HOMEWOOD was committed at the Cape Town Police Court on three separate charges of forgery. The total amount is only some three or four pounds, - Argus.

DEATH BY DROWNING. – A sad accident occurred at the Fish River drift on Sunday last, near Barend LOMBARD’s. It appears that on Sunday morning, Mr. Cebus STAPELBERG, was in Cradock; after Church he proceeded on his way home and arrived at the drift a little before sundown. He saw that the river wasl full, but being a good swimmer, and near home, he tried to cross. When in the water, his horse became unmanageable, and at last flung him. On the following morning the young man’s body was found entabgled in the branches of a tree, with a mark on his forehead as from the kick of a horse. It is very probable that he was disabled the instant he fell from the animal’s back into the water, as he was seen to disappear almost at once by the persons on the other side of the river. – Ibid.

A GRAVE COMPLAINT. – Mr. John SALAM thus complains to the E. P. Herald of the conduct of an hotel keeper in Port Elizabeth lately:
“Sir, - I hope you will oblige me by giving publicity to the statement I am about to make:
“On Saturday evening last I was conveying some passengers to Port Elizabeth in my cart. I had then travelled one hundred and twenty miles. On arriving at Mr. Thomas KELSEY’s hotel, I put my horses in the stable, and asked for a bedroom and some supper. This I was refused, on the plea that I was a man of favour, the landlord making the insulting remark that “he did not keep an hotel for blacks.” I have received as good an education, I believe, as most men in this colony, and I wish to ask the public if the colour of a man’s skin should entitle him to insult or render him unable to obtain that accommodation for which he is able and willing to pay. At every other hotel to which I have been I have received the greatest civilty.”

ADELAIDE.
(Communicated.)
ST. PAUL’S LODGE. The Installation of the W.M. and Officers of the above Lodge took place on Saturday last the 19th inst., and was performed by the W.M.P.M. and Officers of the Zetland Lodge who, attended at the request of the Adelaide B.B. for that purpose.
The Fort Beaufort Brethren arrived early in the morning, and were escorted into the village by several of the residents who rode out as far as Mr. J. T. POHL’s farm to meet them. Everyone was on the qui vice for the ceremony, and as soon as it was known that the expected gentlemen had arrived, little knots of people were seen conversing here and there, detailing each to the other, their various impressions and opinions about the geheim volk as the Dutch groups termed them, and the fraternity as denominated by the English. About eleven o’clock the Lodge was duly opened, and a procession formed in the following order to Christ Church.
Tyler with drawn sword,
Visiting Brethren,
Secretary and Treasurer,
Junior Warden with Plumb Reun,
Member with Light,
Senior Warden with Level,
Junior Deacon,
Member with Light,
Brother with Bible and Square and Compasses,
Worshipful Master,
Brother with Mallet,
Senior Deacon,
Member with Light,
Past Masters,
Inner Guard with Drawn Sword.
On arrival at the Church, the usual morning service was performed, and the Rev. Mr. NORTON delivered a most impressive and eloquent discourse, from the words “Let brotherly love continue,” Hebrews 13 and 1st. At its conclusion the procession reformed and left the church for the Lodge, the organist playing the Masonic March as they moved away. On entering the Lodge, the ceremony of Installation was at once commenced, the Lodge having worked up to the required degree. The warrant of constitution was read, the W.M. elect Bro. N. MEYER, installed in his chair, the impressive charge read by Bro. P.M. Thos.∴WARD, and the new master greeted in time honoured and world renowned form.
The following Officers were then invested by the W.M. with the Jewels pertaining to the several duties: -
Senior Warden – T.P.O. MATHEW
Junior Warden – T. M. HARROD
Secretary and Treasurer – W. H. SHAKESPEARE
Senior Deacon – C. LILFORD
Junior Deacon – H. H. TIPPER
Inner Guard – S. J. POTGEITER
Outer Guard – J. C. HUNE
And will continue in office until the 21st June 1865. The whole of the ceremony was gone through with the utmost regularity and order, and several candidates for membership were proposed.
The Lodge then formally closed, and the whole of the B.B. repaired to the Amateur Christy’s Music Hall, where a splendid cold collation awaited upwards of twenty vigorous appetites that had been sharpened considerably during the performance of the day’s duties.
For a time not a word was spoken and only the click of the knife and fork and the crunching of a self satisfied set of molars could be heard to disturb the busy hum of industrious eaters. Soon, however, the merry voice of Mr. GIDDY was heard, and a call for wine responded to, and was quickly followed by numerous others. Then came the toasts. –
First the W.M. of the day, by R. W. H. GIDDY, Esq., responded to by N. MEYER, Esq.
The W.M.P.M. and officers of Zetland Lodge by N. MEYER, Esq., responded to by J. H. PEARSON, Esq.,
The Stewards of the day, by N. MEYER, Esq., responded to by W. H. SHAKESPEARE, Esq.
Other toasts were drunk and replied, to but as the B.B. from Fort Beaufort were anxious to return to their homes, the table was deserted about 5 p.m., and soon the little company started on the return journey. The whole of the Adelaide Brethren saw them off, and it is with pleasure we record the fact that a more pleasant gathering has not been seen in our little village for many a long day. The best thanks of St. Paul’s Lodge are due to F. W. POHL Esq., who generously placed his Wagon and Horses at the service of the visitors and took some of them into Fort Beaufort.

POSTSCRIPT.

MR. W. GREGOBOWSKI has been appointed Secretary to the Board of Executors, and Mr. J. F. ZIERVOGEL advisory director with a salary.

SALE OF A FARM. – A half-share of the Farms “Van der Berg’s Kuil” and “DOORNPOORT,” were sold last Saturday in the insolvent Estate of H. J. ALBERTYN. Mr. S. E. WIMBLE was the purchaser, for £675. The farm has no fountains or buildings upon it, which accounts for the low price, being about 2s 9d per morgen. The farm is about 4759 morgen in extent, and situated in the Camdeboo. – G. R. Advertiser.

THE BURGHERSDORP GAZETTE states that Mr. J. J. HERMAN, formerly a native missionary, has been charged before the Acting Magistrate, J. WRENCH, Esq., with embezzlement of the property of an estate of which he was one of the executors. The defendant was released on giving bail in £300.
The amount alleged to have been embezzled from the estate is £2,500.

SERIOUS ACCIDENT. – On Tuesday evening a young Mr. GUNN was riding over the flats near Adelaide, his horse being suddenly checked, fell back upon him, dislocating his shoulder and contusing his side. The joint was soon, however, reseated by Mr. MATHEW, under whose skilful care and treatment we are glad to say the boy is doing well.

Saturday, December 3, 1864

ST. MUNGO’S ACADEMY.
At the head of the Tyumie Valley.
The object in establishing this Institution is to supply the means of a High Class Education for young gentlemen.
The buildings are now in such a state of forwardness as to warrant the announcement that Boarders will be received and the classes opened from Tuesday the 24th January, 1865.
The Rector will be happy to correspond with and furnish further information to such parents as may wish to place their sons under his care. He gives no names as reference, but deems it enough to state that he is a Graduate of the University of Glasgow, and has had nearly twenty years’ experience in successful teaching.
Address – Rev. G. BROWN.
St. Mungo’s, Alice.
A few steady Immigrants with families may obtain portions of the Institution lands for cultivation upon advantageous terms.

ALICE.
Public Sale at the Lovedale Seminary, on Wednesday, the 14th instant,
The Rev. R. TEMPLETON, being about to remove from Lovedale, has instructed the undersigned to offer at auction his superior household furniture, made of the finest solid Spanish Maghogany, polished and in first rate order.
Consisting of – Cheffionier, Couch, Drawing Room and Easy Chairs, Chest of Drawers, Washstands, Dressing Tables, Toilet Glasses, Bedsteads, Carpets, Parafine Lamps, superior Dinner and Breakfast Services, Handsome 8-day Clock under Glass Shade, Superior Sewing Machine, in first rate working order, Fine Rosewood Cottage Pianoforte, by STODDART & Son. And anything else that may be offered.
Sale to commence at 11 o’clock sharp.
J. B. TEMLETT, Auctioneer.
Alice, 2nd December, 1864.

FORT BEAUFORT FIRE INSURANCE, TRUST & LOAN INVESTMENT COMPANY.
In the Insolvent Estate of Edward NORTON, of Fort Beaufort.
Sale of Landed Property.
The Undersigned having received instructions from the Trustee in the above Estate will sell by Public Auction, on the spot, on Monday, 19th December, at noon, that new & substantially-built Cottage, belonging to the above Estate, now in the occupation of the insolvent, situated in Campbell-street facing Victoria Bridge, with ground attached, being section No.3 of the divided Lot No. 2, of Erf No 12, D’Urban-street, measuring 38 square roods and 53 square feet. This property is well suited either for a private residence or for a Retail Shop, being directly in the line of traffic across the bridge, also –
A Piece of ground adjoining the foregoing, with a frontage of 75 feet to Campbell-street and a depth of 280 feet, more or less, well adapted for building purposes.
A credit of 6, 12, 18, & 24 months will be given, the instalments bearing interest at 8 per cent per annum.
Jno. QUIN, Sole Trustee.
W. ESTMENT, Jr.
Auctioneer.
Fort Beaufort, December 3, 1864.

MISCELLANEOUS.

THE MILITARY SCANDAL. – An appeal against Judge BELL’s judgement has been entered by the plaintiff in the case HARE vs. WHITE.

WIDOW BLACKBEARD. – Mr. George KNOTT of BOTHA’s Post, has presented the Widow of BLACKBEARD, with a valuable milch cow and calf, worth £15. Those who intend to subscribe to the relief of widow, will please send their contributions without delay, as the list will be closed next week, and the balance in hand forwarded.

THE TREES presented by Mr. Walter SMITH, of Grahamstown, have arrived safely in good order, and are now all planted, and looking healthy. Mr. Wm. AINSLIE has also made a present of some nice young tree plants, which are thriving well. The Grove, under the superintendence of the magistrate, is beginning to assume a very fine appearance. Two of the principal walks have been gravelled. By the hard labor men, so that it will now be a comparatively easy matter to get across the square in wet weather.

THE PORT ELIZABETH TELEGRAPH has the following: - “Mr. S. D. MARKS, lately trading under the firm of S. D. MARKS & Co., met his creditors yesterday at the office of the South African Mortgage and Investment Company. His liabilities are small, amounting to about £5,000, of which two-thirds are owing to creditors in England and the remainder here. A composition of 7s 6d in the £ was tendered to, and accepted by, the creditors present.

UNDER A CLOUD. – We have to lament the sudden departure from Cradock of Messrs. WILKINS, GIRLING, COLLINS, and HASSAN, who have left us under circumstances apparently admitting of no delay. WILKINS, it is said, has taken a pair of horses belonging to Mr. GREAVES; GIRLING forgot to return with the balance of a bank note with which he had been entrusted by Mr. TUCKER to get changes, and COLLINS and HASSAN, not being able to make “ends meet” (as they pathetically observed in a letter placed where they knew it would be found), decided upon leaving Cradock for more genial climes. Four policeman have gone to see if they cannot induce the two first named gentlemen to return to Cradock. COLLINS and HASSAN are “not wanted.” The runaways were last seen, all together, at Kniehalter’s Nek, about 7 hours in advance of the police who were however following on the trail as if sure of their game. – Cradock Register.

THE NEW LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR OF NATAL. – The following official announcement has appeared in the London Gazette: - “Downing-street, October 6. – The Queen has been pleased to appoint John MACLEAN, Esq., C.B. now Lieutenant-Governor of the territories of British Kaffraria, to be Lieutenant-Governor of the colony of Natal.”

DR. EDDIE is now undergoing the seven days’ imprisonment to which he was sentenced by the Resident-Magistrate for the theft of a prayer-book from the sale-board of Mr. Peter POTE. The judge declined to interfere on the ground that the sentence of 7 days did not come within his jurisdiction in review.

VACANCY. – The Municipality of Uitenhage advertise for applications for a Town Clerk and Market Master. Salary £150.

THE NEW TREASURER GENERAL. – Mr. DAVIDSON, the Civil Commissioner of George, has been appointed Treasurer-General of the Colony.

CIRCUIT COURT GRAHAMSTOWN.
THE CHARGE OF FORGERY AGAINST ROBERT PRINGLE.
Robert PRINGLE was then placed at the bar. Mr. DENYSSEN, who, with Mr. BARRY, was retained for the defence, said that before the prisoner was arraigned, he wished to move for the postponement of the trial on the ground of the absence of certain documentary evidence material for the defence. The learned advocate read an affidavit of Mr. Selby CORYNDON, attorney for the prisoner, which set forth that in certain civil actions having reference to the promissory notes alleged to have been forged, certain affidavits were made by FILLMER, whose names was said to have been forged, and that it was essential to the defence of the prisoner that those affidavits should be obtained from the Supreme Court, in Cape Town, and produced on the trial.
The Clerk of the Peace opposed the application on the ground of the expense to which the Government had been put in bringing to Grahamstown the witnesses to prove the case. There were ten in all; some from British Kaffraria, and some from Fort Beaufort.
Mr. DENYSSON said, that at the preliminary examination only three witnesses were examined; and complained that the prisoner should be called upon to meet evidence which he had not had an opportunity of seeing beforehand.
The Clerk of the Peace replied that the preliminary examination was taken at Queenstown; and was necessarily very incomplete. He had not himself had an opportunity of examining several of the witnesses.
Some further conversation took place, in the course of which it was brought to the notice of the Judge that the indictment served on Mr. CORYNDEN, who accepted service for the prisoner, differed from that upon which the Clerk of the Peace proposed to proceed.
The Clerk of the Peace stated that two indictments had been served, the Attorney-General having substituted a second for the one set up; and he believed that the indictment produced by Mr, DENYSSON was the one first served, and which had been superseded by the second.
Mr. CORYNDON said only one had been served. The Judge called for the return of the service, which, however, indictment, of which a copy was served, did not throw any light upon the point in question; and his Lordship directed the Clerk of the Peace to bring the matter to the notice of the Attorney-General, in order that the system might be altered.
Ultimately it was discovered that the indictment served upon Mr. CORYNDEN was the amended one – not the first sent up, as suggested by the Clerk of the Peace.
The Judge enquired if the Clerk of the Peace if the Crown would run any risk of the ends of Justice being defeated by a postponement of the case.
The Clerk of the Peace: Not more than in other cases.
The Judge: The risk of witnesses dying? That is not enough.
The Clerk of the Peace: There is the risk of witnesses getting away.
The Judge: And on the other hand there is the risk of the prisoner being convicted improperly. It is quite probable that it may turn out ultimately that there is nothing in it; on the other hand it is quite possible that what may have been stated in the affidavits of FILLMER may have the effect of shaking his testimony; or may afford to his counsel ground for an argument that his evidence on the trial is contradicted by what he has stated in the affidavits in the civil cases. I cannot take upon myself to say it is not so. I had rather postpone the case than run the risk of the prisoner being convicted improperly. The case must therefore stand over until the next circuit.
The Clerk of the Peace: I do not know how the bail bond is worded.
The Judge: Well it is worded so that it would be worth nothing in my opinion. I frequently see bail bonds written – by magistrates’ clerics I suppose – as if they were writing familiar notes to their friends, without the slightest attention to grammar or common sense. They are usually drawn up in the most slovenly manner possible, and that is no exception to the rule. The bond is so framed that if the prisoner had gone away the sureties could not have been made liable under it, in my opinion. The condition is that the accused shall appear to answer the charge at Queenstown or Fort Beaufort, and here we are at Grahamstown. Such things are exceedingly careless. The Magistrate ought to see that their clerks perform their duties properly.
Mr. DENYSSEN said he believed a fresh bond had been entered into.
The Clerk of the Peace said he had agreed to take the same bail for the prisoners’ appearance at the next Circuit, as at this.
The Judge: Very well, then the case stands over.
This case concluded the criminal roll.

SUICIDE OF A BANK MANAGER. – Mr. Robert Henry WILLIAMS, London manager of the Mercantile and Exchange Bank, has committed suicide by poison. Mr. WILLIAMS had been in state of great mental excitement by the news from Brazil; but all his personal accounts with the bank are correct.

NEWS BY THE “KAFFRARIA.”
(Telegraph Correspondent.)
MULLER is to be tried next week, and although there are not wanting numbers who believe he will get off, the conviction of the majority is that the conclusion of the jury from the evidence that will be placed before them – circumstantial as it is – must be that MULLER is the man who murdered poor Mr. BRIGGS on the North London Railway. Minor railway offences, of the indecent sort, have been rather plentiful, but the vagabonds have met with their “reward.” Railway companies seem bent upon leaving the protection of the public to the consideration of Parliament, and it would certainly be a scandal if next session passed over without an act being passed for the security of railway travellers.

LATEST TELEGRAMS.
PORT ELIZABETH.
Monday, 12.30 p.m.

THE WORKMEN desirous of emigrating to New Zealand, have been informed that they must pre-pay £10 each before they can be taken there, and for this they are to have land. They do not approved of the terms.

THREE SUMMONSES have been issued by Grahamstown creditors in the estate of Mr. Joseph MCMASTER, against the company here which has the management of Mr. MCMASTER’s estate. Two cases are to be heard in the coming circuit court.
It is said that the estate of Joseph MCMASTER has been sequestrated in England.

POSTSCRIPT.

JUDICIAL APPOINTMENTS. – We understand that Mr. Justice WATERMEYER, and Mr. Justice CONNOR, from Natal, - have been appointed Judges of the Eastern Districts Court; and that Mr. Advocate DENYSSEN has received the appointment of Solicitor General to the said Court. Mr. Advocate COLE, has been appointed Law Lecturer to the South African College.

MAJOR LORD BROWN, 59th Regt., and Lady Brown, left Fort Beaufort yesterday, en route for Europe.

CONFESSION OF HANS ANDRIES, THE MURDERER. – Hans ANDRIES, the murderer of the woman and children at the Kowie, has confessed that he committed the deed. He says he had been drinking, that he killed the woman, with a stone, and that he knew nothing of what followed.

RECRUITING FOR AMERICA. – Yesterday, the streets of Cape Town were placarded with flaming offers of assisted Emigration to America. A Mr. WEHRAN is the professed leader and agent of the movement; the hand-bills issued by him “reminds intending emigrants of the fact that labour in America command a price unparalleled in any part of the world (New Zealand not excepted); and full information is offered to all applicants at the office in Church square. On application there, however, we find that there is a wonderful reticence in the communication of the said “information;” there is an air of suspicious reserve in the whole affair; and Mr. WEHRAN (Whoever he may be) has only himself to blame if people should be driven to the conclusion that this is a mere attempt at getting up a Colonial Recruiting Agency for the Federal Armies. That it has been so interpreted by the Public, will be seen from the letter of a leading citizen of Cape Town which appears in another column. In any case, the authorities should be carefully on the qui vive. If this be really a recruiting agency, it is a distinct contravention of the Foreign Enlistment Act, which is quite as binding here as it is in England. In Liverpool, the other day, a merchant of high standing was tried and convicted for assisting in the shipping of a British crew for the Confederate cruiser Georgie. – Adv. & Mail.

VICTORIA EAST.
WINE AND SPIRIT LICENCES.
In conformity with Act No 10 of 1860, Notice is hereby given, that the Resident Magistrate of Victoria East will, in conjunction with such Members and Justices as may attend, sit in the Court Room at Alice, On Wednesday, the 21st December, ay 10 o’clock, for the purpose of granting or otherwise, the undermentioned Licence for the sail of Wines & Spirits, viz:
Charles HIGGS, hotel and tap, at Hartman’s Dower, the property of MR. Field Cornet Jan HARTMAN.
Wm. F. LIDDLE,
Resident Magistrate.
Resident Magistrate’s Office,
Alice, November 22nd, 1864.

NOTICE.
The Resident Magistrate of Fort Beaufort will hold a Court, on Wednesday, 21st December, at 11 o’clock a.m., in conjunction with such members of the Licensing Board as may attend, for the purpose of determining the following application, in accordance with Act No. 9 of 1851, and No 10 of 1860:
Nathaniel ELLIOT, Erf No. 16 in Campbell-street, Fort Beaufort, to keep an Inn, Hotel, & Boarding House, with Tap or Canteen annexed.
L. H. MEURANT,
Resident Magistrate.
Res. Mag’s Office,
November 25, 1864.

Saturday, December 10, 1864

WESLEYAN BAZAAR.
On Tuesday, the 20th December, a Fancy bazaar in connection with the Wesleyan Methodist Society, will be held in the Sunday School Room, when a large and varied assortment of useful and ornamental articles will be displayed, under the management of the Ladies who have kindly offered their services on the occasion.

CHRISTMAS IS COMING!!
The undersigned respectfully solicits orders for his unrivalled mince pies, for Christmas.
Those persons who, in former years have tasted them, will, he feels certain give their orders with confidence; but to those who have not had that felicity, he would say – give them a trial, and they will not have reason to be dissatisfied.
Prices varying from 2d up to 10s.
George JUBBER.
For the convenience of country residents, G. J. will sell Mince Meat at 2s 6d per lb.

“ALBION HOTEL.”
The undersigned begs to inform the inhabitants of Fort Beaufort, and the public in general, that she has taken over the above Hotel, and trusts, by strict attention to business, combined with moderate charges, to merit a share of public support.
This promises have lately undergone thorough repair, and such arrangements made as will insure comfort to the travelling public.
Travellers, Families, or other parties, visiting the town on business or pleasure, will find this Hotel replete with every comfort.
Best Wines and Spirits. – Good stabling, and Moderate Charges.
Elizabeth BISHOP.

MASONIC HOTEL, FORT BEAUFORT.
G. R. IRVINE,
Having taken over the above Hotel, begs to inform Travellers and others who may favour him with a call, that he has had the whole premises thoroughly renovated, and that every comfort can now be obtained at moderate charges.
Best quality Wines, Spirits, &c., always on hand.
P.S. – In connection with the above, a good assortment of Groceries will be kept in stock from the 1st January next, which will be sold cheap.

MISCELLANEOUS.

AMATEUR BAND. – This Band performed in the grove on Saturday afternoon. Unfortunately the public was not aware of the intention to play, and consequently many who would otherwise have been present were deprived of the treat.

DRAMATIC CLUB. – The arrangements for the debut of the dramatic amateurs are in a state of forwardness, and in the course of a couple of weeks, the first public performance will probably be announced. The building in Church street, has been renovated and decorated very tastefully, and the accommodation for the public made as complete as possible, under the circumstances. “Boots of the Swan,” we are informed, is to be one of the first pieces played.

GIFT. – A storeman in the employ of Mr. J. B. TEMLETT, has presented the Widow BLACKBEARD with a nice heifer, for which had refused £4.

POSTAL. – Mr. MEURANT left on Tuesday for the Koonap to complete the arrangements with Mr. T. FRANCIS for the conveyance of additional posts in his passenger cart running between this and Grahamstown.

A LARGE CHRISTMAS PARTY. – On Tuesday morning a very large party of pleasure seekers passed through the town on their way to the Keiskamma mouth where they intend to enjoy themselves at the sea-side in true South African style for a couple of weeks. The party comprised the Messes. POHL, CLOETE and POTGIETER with their families and attendants, numbering in all between 80 and 90 souls. There were no less than eight wagons brought into requisition, to convey the female and junior members of the families, and the good things on which to make merry, - the males and attendants proceeding on horseback, armed, and accompanied by an immense troop of sporting dogs. In the commissariat department of the expedition, there were no less than 50 slaughter hamels, and five of the finest milch cows in the district, from the herds of the POHL’s. This is something like a party, and we have no doubt those composing it will be able to enjoy themselves to their hearts content. It’s what we should call a jolly little family party.

IN CONNECTION WITH THE NEW APPOINTMENTS, the E. P. Herald says that “out of doors,” Mr. R. W. H. GIDDY, Clerk of the Peace of Fort Beaufort has been mentioned as likely to be Mr. DAVIDSON’s successor. We do not know whether this is decided upon or not, but if it be, we may congratulate the people of George on the appointment, for there is not a smarter officer than Mr. GIDDY on the Civil Service List.”

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR has been pleased to appoint William Bisset BERRY, Esq., M. D., to be district surgeon of Queen’s Town, in the room of E. ARCHER, Esq., resigned.

THE LAW LECTURESHIP. – His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to appoint Alfred Whaley COLE, Esq., Barrister-at-law, to the office of Lecturer on Law and Jurisprudence, rendered vacant by the decease of Frederick Stephanus WATERMEYER, Esq.

WE ARE INFORMED that an investigation has taken place before the Magistrate of Bedford, relative to the charges made by C. F. POHL against Ben. SOLOMON, and it is said, POHL has contradicted the whole of his previous statements, which having been made on oath, has caused the Magistrate to commit him for trial on a charge of Perjury. – Somerset Courant.

HIS HONOR THE PRESIDENT, who appears indefatigable in the discharge of his onerous and difficult duties, will, we understand, leave for Winburg with the Commando this day. – Friend.

DESERTERS. – The Government Gazette of this morning contains descriptions of ten men who deserted form the 2nd 10th regiments between the 12th and 21st inst.

GIFT FROM THE GOVERNOR. – His Excellency has presented the Public Library with three magnificent folio volumes, by WARING, describing and illustrating the master pieces of industrial art and sculpture at the International Exhibition of 1862.

PLEASANT SURPRISE. – The Paarl correspondent of the Argus states that a treasure-trove was opened in the office of the civil commissioner not very long ago. When Mr. BREDA “resigned the seals,” his successor, Mr. KINNEAR, discovered in the civil commissioner’s chest a small bag, supposed to contain only bunches of keys so there the bag remained till Mr. AURET came into office. To him the bag presented itself also, he did not mistake it for a treasury of steel, so he opened it, and to his surprise found, we believe, nearly £200 in it, in bank notes and cheques of various sorts. Of course they were very soon handed over to Mr. BREDA, who took the bag, and was thankful.

TELEGRAPH FRAUDS. – Daniel OKKERS, the messenger lately employed in the Telegraph Office here, was on Wednesday last apprehended on several charges of forgery and fraud committed by him during the last six weeks. At the examination held before the Magistrate on Thursday, no fewer than nineteen distinct charges were proved against him. In twelve of the cases Messrs. BARRY and Nephews were the parties defrauded, and in the other seven Mr. John REITZ. Messrs, BARRY, REITZ, HESSE, TAATS, WEHR, and the Chief Constable were examined at some length, and from the statement of these gentlemen it would appear that the prisoner, part of whose duty was to collect the money for the different messages, was in the habit of altering the sum charged on the tickets, or forging other tickets to which he signed the name of MR. WEHR, the telegraph clerk. The prisoner was fully committed for trial at the next Circuit Court. The only thing which can be urged in palliation of the prisoner’s guilt, is the inadequacy of his wages in proportion to the responsibility of the duties imposed upon him, his pay, as we are informed, being on £1 per month. – Overberg Courant.

WE ARE INFORMED that Willem van ZYL, the farmer who was concerned in the death of John BLACK, and who was lately committed for trial at Robertson on the charge of wilful murder, has since been liberated on bail to the amount of £2,500. The opinion prevails that van ZYL’s offence only amounts to manslaughter, and a memorial was sent to the Attorney-General on the subject, who at once ordered the prisoner to be liberated on giving security for his re-appearance. The bail is looked upon here as enormously large. – Ibid.

DARLING. – We regret to learn that the parsonage at Darling was totally destroyed by fire on Monday Afternoon, during the absence of the Rev. Mr. KOTZE on a visit to a dying member of his flock, Mrs. THUYNSMA. The fire is believed to have originated in the kitchen, and, extending to the thatched roof of the house, the whole was soon enveloped in the flames and destroyed. Notwithstanding the most zealous effort very little of the moveable effects (including part of Mr. KOTZE’s library and the church books) was saved. It is understood, that the parsonage was insured for £700, and Mr. KOTZE’s goods for £500. – Zuid Afrikaan.

KOTZE V. THE SYNOD. – The Synodical commission has, by a majority resolved not to prosecute the appeal of the Privy Council in this case. The majority of the members of the Synod who have consulted by circular, have declared themselves opposed to such a proceeding. It is said that the scribe of the Synod, Dr. ROBERTSON, has consulted an eminent barrister in England, who has given it as his opinion that it would be hopeless to appeal as, - not to allude to other matter, - not even the first requirement of a judicial trial had been complied with, namely, to serve the accused with a proper indictment. – Ibid.

THE FORT BEAUFORT FIRE INSURANCE AND TRUST COMPANY appears to be in great favour, and numerous enquiries are made for its scrip. Rumour says that the company is doing a capital business in all its branches. Most of the estates are thrown into its hands; it has the choice of the insurances in its neighbourhood, and its capital has found ready customers at 10 (and more) per cent. The first annual meeting will be held in January next; the trust deed provides that until the reserve fund is made up to £3,000 not more than three-fourths of the profits shall be divided. There is no doubt that, notwithstanding that this is the first year of its existence, it will show a splendid return for the capital invested. – Journal.

EMIGRATION TO AMERICA. – Over 400 persons, it is said, are entered as passengers to America from Cape Town. The Golden Age, steamer, on her voyage from there, will be the first vessel to take emigrants.

THE TREASURER-GENERALSHIP. – His Excellency the Governor has been pleased subject to confirmation by Her Majesty, to appoint James Christopher DAVIDSON, Esq., Civil Commissioner and Resident Magistrate for the division and district of George, to be Treasurer and Accountant-General of the colony, in the room of the Honourable Richard SOUTHEY, Esq., appointed Colonial Secretary.

BOLTED. – We understand that a certain Mr. S. engaged as a clerk here, has suddenly bolted it is supposed to Natal by the Kaffraria, leaving his anxious creditors in a state of great suspense as to his intended movements. – Telegraph.

ARISTOCRATIC AMUSEMENTS. – Vaulting ambition overleaped itself at a pic-nic given by Sir Walter CURRIE in the pleasant grounds of Oatlands on Tuesday. Sir Walter and Col. HAMILTON were playing at leap-frog, when the gallant Colonel missed his “back,” severely injuring himself and Sir Walter in the fall. – Ibid.

THE GOVERNOR OF HONG KONG, Sir Hercules ROBINSON, has been promoted to Ceylon. This puts an end to the rumour that Sir Philip WODEHOUSE was about to be removed to that post.

POSTSCRIPT.

EMIGRATION TO NEW ZEALAND. – The ship Eveline, Capt. T. TAYLOR, left Table Bay, on December 2, with 336 souls as emigrants for New Zealand.

THE ALICE AND CHALUMNA RIFLE CLUBS held their shooting match Tuesday morning at the Military butts – the Chalumna beating by 34 points. Distance 100, 200 and 800 yards. Prize £10 aside.

THE FOLLOWING ESTATE IS SEQUESTRATED: - Abraham Lodivicus KRUGER, farmer, of Mosfontein, in the division of Cradock; assets, £4,784; liabilities, £5,014; deficiency, £280.

ATTEMPTED MURDER – A man, named GASCOIGNE, attempted to murder his wife at Port Elizabeth on Tuesday night, he stabbed her in three different places, and stabbed two other persons also, and then cut his own throat. The stabs will be fatal in none of the cases. The man is in custody.

APPOINTMENTS. – The Revs. BENNY, MURPHY and ANDREWS are appointed trustees of the Port Elizabeth Library. Dr. EDMONDS to be District Surgeon of Burghersdorp, in the room of Dr. ZIERVOGEL, resigned.

RECRUITING FOR THE FEDERALS. – It is said that some parties resident at King Williamstown have been offered 800 Sp dollars as a bonus to enter as officers in the Federal army, together with a promise of good pay and treatment, &c. It is also rumoured that two vessels may be expected from Boston towards the end of this month – one at East London and one at the Cape – for the purpose of taking the recruits willing to join the Kilkenny Cat expedition. – Gazette.

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN has been graciously pleased to confirm the following appointments:
John HUDSON, Esq., to be civil commissioner and resident magistrate for the division and district of Victoria West;
William Francis LIDDLE, Esq., for Victoria East;
Percy NIGHTINGALE, Esq., for Bedford;
Charles William SOUTHEY, Esq., for Richmond;
Alfred Carrington WYLDE, Esq., for Mossel Bay;
Edward Arthur JUDGE, Esq., for Namaqualand;
Louis Henry MEURANT, Esq., for Fort Beaufort; and
Louis ANTHING Esq., for Cradock.
Mr. GRAHAM, C.C. of Graham’s Town, is to be appointed to succeed Lt. Governor MACLEAN, pro tem, and
Mr. HUDSON of Somerset, will succeed Mr. GRAHAM.
Mr. HUNTLY is to be Registrar of the new Court, which is to open on the 1st February.
Adv. DENNYSON is to be one of the judges,
Judge CONNOR of Natal, the other.
MR. FICHAT, the Civil Commissioner of Bathurst, is to succeed Mr. DAVIDSON, at George; and
Mr. DUTHIE is to be the Civil Commissioner of Bathurst.

RAILWAY. – Port Elizabeth and Graham’s Town are in great glee at the prospect of the Railway being commenced at once. Instructions, it is said, having been issued to have the “first sod” turned in January. Mr. HEADFORD, C. E., has arrived in Port Elizabeth to prepare the preliminaries, and Mr. BOURNE is expected by the January steamer. Won’t the money fly – for a time.

CONTRACTS FOR THE TROOPS. – The Messrs. CAWOOD have been the most successful tenderers for the supply of bread and meat for the troops in Graham’s Town and Fort Beaufort; and Mr. F. SCHERMBRUCKER, for the supply of the troops in Kaffraria.

THE “UITENHAGE TIMES.” – We have received the prospectus of this new paper, the first number of which will be published during the present month. The paper will be printed partly in Dutch and partly in English, and under the management of this energetic proprietor Mr. BIDWELL, we have no doubt will meet with deserved success.

A SITUATION WANTED, by an Englishman who has been four years in the Province, and accustomed to superintending livestock and agriculture; would make himself generally useful on a farm. The advertiser is married, but without incumberance, and would be willing for his wife to attend to Dairy or housework.
Satisfactory testimonials can be seen, and further particulars obtained on application to w. MCGLASHAN.
Alice, Dec. 7, 1864.

WIDOW BLACKBEARD.

Amount received, advertised and remitted to the Widow

£

22

19

6

Work done

 

2

10

0

 

£

25

9

6

Rev. Mr. DORRINGTON

 

0

10

0

Mr. W. STAPLES

 

2

0

0

W. SHAKESPEARE

 

2

0

0

W. M.

 

1

0

0

H. EDKINS

 

1

0

0

T. WHITTLE

 

0

5

0

LIST OF LICENCES ISSUED FROM THIS OFFICE since the date of last return.
Gunpowder Licences.
C. HOLLIDAY, Fort Beaufort.
Hawkers Licences.
Edw. ORCHARD, Adelaide.
Game Licences.
John DELL, Bush Kloof.
John T. REILLY, Fort Beaufort.
W. H. RAWSTORNE.
Dis. Of Stamps.
Fort Beaufort, 21st Nov. 1864.

Saturday, December 17, 1864

AMATEUR THEATRICALS, Fort Beaufort.
Under the patronage of L. H. MEURANT, Esq., C.C., on Friday Evening the 23rd December, the member of the above company will give their first entertainment, as follows: -
1st – That highly amusing farce called The Boots at the Swan. To be followed by a vocal entertainment. The whole to conclude with that favourite farce called Don’t Judge by Appearances.
Doors open at ½ past 7, performance to commence precisely at 8.
Tickets 2s 6d each, to be had at the store of Mr. VIGNE, where a plan of the House can be seen.
Carriages can be order for 11.
W. F. GATONBY, Hon. Sec.

SALE OF LANDED PROPERTY IN ADELAIDE.
In the Insolvent Estate of William MURFIN, of Tarkastad.
The Trustee in the above Estate will cause to be sold on the spot, on Monday, January 22, 1865,
All the Landed Property belonging to the said Estate, situate in the rising and flourishing town of Adelaide.
1st. – That valuable Property, Erf No. 3, Block E, with Buildings thereon. Consisting of a substantial & spacious dwelling house and outbuildings, replete with every convenience, and which is now, and has been for a considerable length of time past, occupied by Mr. T. MATTHEWS.
2nd. – Erf No. 2, Block A, whereon is erected a well-built and convenient cottage, which was built by the Insolvent for his own occupation, who, being a builder, it is not likely that he would have used bad material in its erection.
3rd. – Erf No.4, Block E, adjoining lot No.1, unbuilt, but which from its position would at all times be worthy the attention of Speculators.
The credit for the premises built on will extend by instalments to 18 months, and that of the Erf to 6 and 9 months.
For Further information apply to N. MEYER, Esq., Adelaide, and to Charles HOWARD, Esq., Bedford.
E. F. HOWARD, Sole Trustee.
Tarkastad, December 1, 1865.

FORT BEAUFORT.
Saturday, December 17, 1864.
SUMMARY BY THE “ROMAN.”
In England the topic which appeared to engage the greatest share of the attention of the many headed, was the trial and conviction of the German, MULLER, for the murder of Mr. BRIGGS, who was sentenced to be hanged on the 14th Nov. To people unacquainted with the morbid peculiarities of the English national character, the intense interest which the mob has exhibited in this case, is incomprehensible. Among the lower orders of the metropolis the demand for portraits of the felon was enormous. The photographic studios have been cleared of the superfluous stock-in-trade by the furor, the portraits of eminent statesmen, poets, philosophers, generals, and even royal personages, personally unknown to the mob, although not to fame, having been palmed off and eagerly purchased as pictures of the murderer MULLER.

MISCELLANEOUS.

THEATRICALS. – On Friday evening next the first performance of the amateurs will take place in the building in Church Street, which has been tastefully decorated. The amateur band will be present. The building will only accommodate 70 or 80, so that there is likely to be a “rush” for tickets. See Programme.

Mr. C. W. HUTTON has resigned the Deputy Sheriffship of Bedford, in consequence, it is said, of some unpleasant complaints which have been made against him in respect of the discharge of his official duties.

WE HAVE RECEIVED information from a reliable source that the Resident Magistrate of Uitenhage, J. R. INNES, Esq., will, in all probability, be the successor to our Magistrate here. Universal regret is felt at the removal of Mr. HUDSON. – Somerset Courant.

ON TUESDAY last the Clerk of the Peace held a preliminary examination into a most serious charge preferred against a Dutchman named J. J. BEKKER. The accused is charged with an atrocious crime on a child nine years of age. The particulars are too disgusting for publication. The prisoner denies the charge, but the pitiable and dangerous state of the child, is quite sufficient evidence as regards the abominable act. – Ibid.

WIDOW BLACKBEARD. – Below will be found a list of subscriptions collected in Alice for the relief of the Widow BLACKBEARD.  The sum total, however, does not represent the extent of the charity of the Alice people towards the poor woman and family, as several acceptable presents of children’s clothes, &c. have been forwarded, besides which the Alice people are still liable for their share of the reward of £55 offered for the apprehension of the murderer.

W. F. LIDDLE, Esq.

£

1

1

0

F. PRIOR

 

1

1

0

W. MCGLASHAN

 

1

1

0

J. GADD

 

1

1

0

S. SPRANGER

 

1

0

0

A friend

 

0

10

0

J. A. CAIRNS

 

0

10

0

T. A. C.

 

0

10

0

James AYLIFF

 

0

10

0

A friend

 

0

5

0

J. B.

 

0

5

0

G. W. ELS

 

0

5

0

R. KEYS

 

0

5

0

A friend

 

0

5

0

J. H. FRANCIS

 

0

5

0

E. H.

 

0

5

0

A friend

 

0

2

6

J. HARTMAN

 

0

2

6

G. H. van NIEKERK

 

0

2

6

M. J. LOTTER

 

0

2

6

W. DIRK

 

0

2

6

 

£

9

11

0

 

LATEST NEWS.
(By Electric Telegraph)
Plymouth, Nov. 6, 10 a.m.
SIR GEORGE GREY has promised the New Zealanders to not confiscate more than one fourth of their lands.

THE TREMENDOUS flood of photographic portraits which is now thrown upon the public is extraordinary, and lends to no little imposition and to some confusion is the great market of the poorer classed of the metropolis. In the New Cut, Lambeth, the Brill, Somers-town, and in other busy places, the photographic effigies of the men of the day are sold in enormous numbers. Certain faces are so well marked and so familiar that no mistake can be made; but there is many a man of mark whose visage is not generally known to the multitude, and in these cases great imposition and confusion take place; and portraits of learned professors, ministers of state, and even royal personages, are sold as that of the moment, even though he is a murderer. Recently there has been a remarkable instance of this; the extraordinary excitement in connection with the murder of Mr. BRIGGS, has caused an immense demand for the photographic portraits of MULLER, the suspected murderer; and on the Saturdays’ in the markets mentioned, a familiar cry is. – “portrait of MULLER – only a penny;” “Here is the authentic portrait – only a half-penny. On examining the proffered sun pictures, there may be found amongst them the familiar features of Professor OWEN, Sir Roderick MURCHISON, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Crown Prince of Prussia, Prince Louis of Hesse, and many others. The morbid taste which has given to MULLER a passing notoriety as great as that of famous warriors and statemen, will be the means of clearing out the otherwise surplus stock of many a photographer and seller of photographs; but persons of fame and respectability will at the same time have their portraits imposed upon the public as that of a man charged with a foul charge, and whose features do not belie the charge.

SOMETHING LIKE A BOWL OF PUNCH. – On the 25th of October, 1864, a bowl of punch was made at the Right Hon Edward RUSSELL’s house when he was Captain General Commander-in-Chief of his Majesty’s force in the Mediterranean Sea. It was made in a fountain in a garden in the middle of four walks, all covered overhead with orange and lemon trees; and in every walk was a table, the whole length of it, covered with cold collations, &c. In the said fountain were the following ingredients – namely,
4 hogsheads of brandy,
25,000 lemons,
20 gallons lime-juice,
1300 weight of fine Lisbon sugar,
5lb. grated nutmegs,
300 toasted biscuits,
1 pipe of dry mountain Malaga.
Over the fountain was a large canopy to keep off the rain; and there was built on purpose a little boat, wherein was a boy belonging to the fleet, who rowed round the fountain and filled the cups of the company, and in all probability, more than 6000 men drank thereof.

POSTSCRIPT.

THE BEDFORD BRANCH OF THE STANDARD BANK. – Mr. PYE, the Manager of the Bedford branch of the Standard Bank, has arrived at the scene of his future labours, and will immediately commence operations.

THE NATIVE COMMISSION. – The following gentlemen are appointed a commission for “inquiring into our relations with the native tribes within and beyond the colonial boundary:” –
G. WOOD, jun., Esq., M.L.A.;
Rev. W. IMPEY;
W. F. LIDDLE, Esq., C.C., Victoria East;
J. O. WARNER, Esq.,;
Jonathan AYLIFF, Esq., M.L.A.;
W. R. THOMPSON, Esq., M. L. A.; and
J. C. HOOLE, Esq.

THE INTELLIGENCE has arrived from Cape Town that Mr. JACOBS is to be Solicitor-General.

THE APPOINTMENTS OF Mr. FITCHAT to the magistracy of George, and of Mr. DUTHIE to that of Bathurst, as referred to in our last, are duly notified in yesterday’s Gazette.

THE GOVERNOR has appointed two commissions to enquire into and report upon the Law of Inheritance – one for the Western Province, and one for the East, each of seven members. The Eastern Commission is to be Messrs. S. JACOBS, DENYSSEN, BENJAMIN, Hon. G. WOOD, Hon. R. GODLONTON, J. AYLIFF, and H. BLAINE.

Saturday, December 24, 1864

[ADVERTISEMENT.]
THE WIDOW of the late William BLACKBEARD begs to avail herself of this means of expressing her gratitude to Mr. J. QUIN, of Fort Beaufort, and Mr. MCGLASHAN, of Alice, also individually to each of the Christian friends in their vicinities, who so feelingly sympathised in her sad affliction, and who so very generously contributed in assisting to surmount her pecuniary difficulties.
Mary BLACKBEARD.
Fort White,
22nd December, 1864.
To the Editor of the F. B. Advocate.

BIRTH, at Cathcart Cottage, Eland’s Post, on 14th December 1864, Mrs. W. T. L. EMETT, of a son.

MISCELLANEOUS.

LICENCING BOARD. – A licence was granted by the licensing Board on Wednesday, to Mr. N. ELLIOT, to keep an hotel, and canteen, on his premises Campbell street.

A PIECE OF LAND at the bottom of the town was sold on Monday in the estate of E. NORTON, and fetched £46. The house was not sold, the sum bid not being satisfactory.

THE THIRD meeting in the estate of James DAVIDSON, will be held at Alice on the 28th January.

BAZAAR. – The Wesleyan Bazaar was held on Tuesday last, and considering the hard times, realized a very handsome sum. The articles for sale were tastefully displayed in the Wesleyan Schoolroom, and the ladies were very assiduous and seductive in the discharge of their onerous duties. The bazaar was not concluded until next day, and the total realized was between £70 and £80.

WE REGRET TO HEAR that the Hon. R. SOUTHEY, Colonial Secretary, is very seriously indisposed. His illness is of so grave a nature, that he has telegraphed for his son to go down to Cape Town. Mr. SOUTHEY has been worked beyond the strength of his constitution.

HOUSEBREAKING AND THEFT. – A private of the C.M. Rifles, named NEWBERG, underwent a preliminary examination on Monday last before the Resident Magistrate, on the charge of being a principal in breaking into the store at. Mr. HOLLIDAY, and stealing sundry articles therefrom, about two months ago. The prisoner had offered some boots and a piece of black velvet for sale, and this led to his apprehension on suspicion. The principal witness against prisoner was a private of the same regiment named SMITH, who swore that NEWBERG had told him that he and another had broken into Mr. HOLLIDAY’s and stole a quantity of boots, and other things, which were concealed on the flat. Other witnesses swore to having seen the prisoner with another C.M.R. soldier in the vicinity of Mr. HOLLIDAY’s at a late hour on the night of the robbery. NEWBERG denied the charge, and was remanded for further evidence.

LANGE versus WHITE, the action for slander brought by the Rev. Mr. LANGE, on behalf of his daughter against the Lieut. Col. WHITE, R.E. in the Supreme Court of Kaffraria has ended in a verdict for the plaintiff for £620 damages, and costs, which will amount to another £600, as it is said. This case has excited considerable interest in Kaffraria and in the colony; which has been rather increased by unexpected judgement of Judge BELL, in the action HARE versus WHITE, originating in the same circumstances and tried at the last Grahamstown Circuit. We are not yet, at the time of writing, in possession of the particulars of the trial, but we have no hesitation in saying that the verdict of the jury is received by the general public with unmitigated satisfaction.
HARE vs. CROZIER. – The plaintiff in this case, also arising out of the Military scandal case, obtained a verdict of £5 for the assault committed upon him.

COMMISSIONERS OF MUNICIPALITY v. M. C. EKSTEEN. – This was rather a laughable case. Mr. EKSTEEN had tendered for the Municipal pound, and his tender was accepted. A dispute was now raised as to the amount of the tender, and it came out in evidence that the commissioners had lighted their pipes with the tender, instead of filing it! The Commissioners were able, however, to prove the amount by reference to their minute book. – Judgement for plaintiffs, each party to pay their own costs – a lesson to commissioner not to light their pipes with important documents. – Overberg Courant.

RETURN OF THE CIRCUIT JUDGE. – Mr. Justice BELL, returned to Cape Town by the steamer Anglian on Tuesday. His Lordship, we regret to hear, is indoisposed, but not seriously, but it is hoped a few days’ quiet will be sufficient to restore him. Advocates DENYSSEN and DEWET made an appearance in the Supreme Court yesterday. – Argus.

ANOTHER DEATH BY LIGHTNING. – It is with extreme regret that we have to announce the sad loss sustained by Mr. G. VERGOTTINI, of Winburg, of his only son a find lad of nine years of age, who was struck down by lightning on the 1st inst., and killed on the spot. Mr. V. is universally esteemed not only in Winburh but by all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance, and he and his family will have, we are happy to assure them, the sincere sympathy of the whole community. – Ibid.

Saturday, December 31, 1864

VICTORY HOTEL,
Campbell-street, Fort Beaufort.
N. ELLIOT
Begs to acquaint his friends and the public at large, that he has opened an Hotel on his premises, Campbell-street, where, from the first of the year, he will be able to afford travellers & others superior accommodation. No pains have been spared to render the premises suitable for an Hotel business, and those who may favour him with a call may rely upon receiving every attention to their wants.
Wines, Spirits, &c., of the best quality only, will be kept on hand.
Good Grooms and Stabling, and the sweetest Hay await the tired roadster.
Fort Beaufort, December 30, 1864.

MISCELLANEOUS.

ERRATUM. – An error appears in our Almanac for 1865, to which we wish to direct the attention of the public. In the list of officials under the head of Stockenstrom the name of M. E. SMIT, Esq., has been inadvertently inserted as Deputy Sheriff of that district instead of that of Robert BOVEY, Esq., who has been duly appointed by the High Sheriff.

AIDED SCHOOL. – A public meeting was held in the Court room on Wednesday last, the Civil Commissioner in the chair, for the purpose of establishing a Government school, in terms of the Government Minute on the subject. There was a pretty good attendance, and the discussion was very lively but good humoured. A large school committee was appointed, and it was resolved to apply to the Government for the sum of £130 in aid of the teacher’s salary, and £30 for house rent, and also for a schoolroom; - the meeting undertaking to give a guarantee for an additional £130 to the master’s salary. The principal point debated was the amount of the school fees to be charged, some contending for a low rate in order to bring education within the means of every one in the community, - others holding out for a higher rate, on the ground that cheap education was seldom appreciated. The proposition, which was eventually carried by a large majority of those present was, that children under 7 years pay 5s per month; under 10 years 7s 6 d per month; and above 10 years, 10s per month, - a reduction of one third to be allowed on every child above one belonging to the same parents. It was further resolved in order to provide for the case of those who would not be able to pay these rates, that the committee have the discretionary power to reduce the rates in ac- with circumstances. The salary of the teacher was fixed at £260 per annum, with house rent, provided the Government consented to pay it; - and the Rev. Mr. ROSSITER of Alice, who had been officiated for the Rev. Mr. WILSON of that place, having applied for the officer of teacher, it was resolved that the gentleman be appointed to the office subject to the approval of Government. The engagement with Mr. ROSSITER, is to be for one year from the 1st February next, when the school is to be opened, subject to a notice of three months on either side. About £70 towards the guarantee were subscribed in the room, and it is apprehended that there will be no difficulty in obtaining a guarantee for the other £60. Mr. KNIGHT was appointed Secretary and Treasury to the Committee, but no mention was made of salary, which we think was an unintentional omission, as it can hardly be expected that the duties which he will have to perform can be undertaken gratuitously.

OLD FACES. – We are glad to be able to welcome back, amongst us, Mr. and Mrs. BRUCE, who have returned from Europe after a visit of 12 or 14 months in improved health.

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR directs it to be notified that Her Majesty the Queen has been graciously pleased to confirm the appoint of William Buchanan CHALMERS, Esq., as civil commissioner and resident magistrate for the division and district of Hope Town.

ICE. – The luxury has been introduced into Port Elizabeth and Grahamstown through the instrumentality of Mr. AVERY who has secured a monopoly by Act of Parliament. It is to be hope that means will be adopted to enable the inland towns to participate in a luxury, which would prove particularly grateful at this season of the year.

A PROLIFIC COW. – The other day a cow belonging to Mr. David BENARDE, of Naauw Poort, division of Middleberg, presented her owner with three calves, all well and hearty.

J. ROSE INNES, Esq., C.C. and R.M. – We (Uitenhage Times) have the best authority for contradicting a statement which appeared in the “Somerset and Bedford Courant,” and has since been going the round of the papers, to the effect that Mr. INNES is likely to succeed Mr. HUDSON as Civil Commissioner of Somerset East. There is not the least truth in the report.

THE FIXED PROPERTY in the division of Port Elizabeth has just been valued by Mr. Robert ARCHIBALD, the Town Engineers, at £1,029,729. The valuation has been made for divisional road purposes.

FIRE AT COLESBERG. – The premises of Mr. KNOBEL, says the local Advertiser were totally destroyed by fire last week. The house was insured, but not the stock so that Mr. KNOBEL will be a heavy loser.

MATRIMONY. – Two weddings were solemnized in the proprietary School-room on Wednesday last. The first was John TEMLETT, Esq., of Grahamstown, to Hannay [sic] Cooper, daughter of David HOBSON, Esq., of this town; the second, Joshua HOBSON, Esq., of Orange Grove, and son of David HOBSON, Esq., to Selina, second daughter of Isaac HUBBARD, Esq., of Hope Fountain. The former couple departed for Grahamstown the same day, accompanied by Mr. James Brilliant TEMLETT of Alice, brother of the bridegroom. We are informed that Mr. TEMLETT’s vehicle got upset on his way hither, but fortunately nobody sustained any injury. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. BROTHERTON of Grahamstown. – Uitenhage Times.

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR has been pleased to appoint Mr. B. K. WAKEFORD to issue certificates of citizenship to the Fingoes in the division of Albany, under the provisions of the Certificates Amendment Act, 1864.

THE MURDERER of le ROUX will not suffer capital punishment. The sentence of death passed upon him has been commuted to imprisonment with hard labour for life. This step has not met with anything like general approbation on the part of the inhabitants of the district. – Somerset Courant.

POSTSCRIPT.

THE GROVE. – We are glad to state that the trees in the grove are making great progress. Immense labor is being expended under the superintendence of MR. MEURANT in laying out and gravelling the walks, and in digging large holes for the young trees. During the past week no less than 300 young trees have been planted along the walks, comprising five varieties of the Auricania (Norfolk Island Pine), Philadelphia Grandifloras, Dantziaz, Tamarisk, Catalpa Syronggifolin, Callistris Australia, Paulownia Imperialis, Blackwood, blue, white, red, and brown gums, and other choice trees, - all of which are growing beautifully. All the trees ordered from Grahamstown have arrived, and will be in the ground in a few days. It is to be regretted that after all the pains that have been taken by the Magistrate to lay out regular walks, people will still make “short cuts” through the grove to the great risk of the young trees. Even ladies, we blush to write, will persist in deviating from the proper lines. We feel sure that it is only necessary to remind people of the care which a young plantation requires, to prevent them from walking in “devious oaths” through the grove, until the trees have reached a growth which will secure them from injury. Parents, too, should keep children out of the grove at present to prevent mischief. It was only the other morning, after a number of young trees had been planted the evening before, that it was found that some of the most promising red and blue gums had been destroyed, apparently, from the spoor, by children. This is too bad, after all the trouble and money that had been expended in a work which will be both a beauty and a comfort to the town for ages.

THE RUMOUR which was current here a few days ago, and which appeared in these columns, as well as in other journals, to the effect that Mr. C. W. HUTTON of Bedford had resigned his office of Deputy Sheriff, owing, as it was said, to certain complaints preferred against him in the discharge of his official duties, is incorrect. Mr. HUTTON has not resigned. Mr. HUTTON’s friend think the paragraph in question injurious to the reputation of that gentleman, inasmuch as it might be inferred that he was not able to show the groundlessness of any complaints which might be urged against him. If this inference be correct, the far more satisfactory one would follow, that since MR. H has not resigned, he is able to remove all unpleasant complaints.

AN ACT OF GRACE. – Prior to the departure of the late Lieutenant-Governor Colonel MACLEAN, from these territories, we understand His Honor performed an act of grace by releasing from prison several criminals whose term of punishment was unexpired. Among these it is said are Messrs. JAMES, BLAKEMORE, KEITH, and two or three others, both European and native, whose good conduct in gaol had warranted mercy being extended to them. – K. W. T. Gazette.

OLIVER WEBSTOCK has been committed for trial on a second charge of forgery, that of discounting a bill for £41 10s, at the London and South African Bank, with a forged signature of W. EWING, of Fort Beaufort.

THE OPENING OF THE GRAHAMSTOWN JUDICIAL COURT. - A proclamation in Friday’s Gazette notifies that “The Court of the Eastern Districts of the Cape of Good Hope, as by the Act created, will be open upon, from, and after Saturday, the 4th Feb., 1865, at 10 o’clock in the forenoon, and that the said court will, for the time being, be holden in the City of Grahamstown at the old Court-house there situate, and from and after said day and hour the said court will be competent to exercise the certain concurrent jurisdiction conferred upon it by the said Act.”

NOTICE is hereby given that the following licences are renewable at this Office on 1st January next.

Retail Shop

Licences,

Butchers

do.

Bakers

do.

Wholesale

do.

Gunpowder

do.

Auctioneers

do.

Billiard Table

do.

Hawkers

do.

W. H. RAWSTORNE.
Dis. of Stamps.
Stamp Office,
Fort Beaufort, 29th Dec., 1864.


 

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