Fort Beaufort Advocate 1871 2 April - June

Saturday, April 1, 1871

LARGE SALE OF LAND, STOCK, WAGONS, &C.
In the Intestate Estate of Adriaan C. ACKERMAN.
Messrs. COTTERELL & QUIN, being duly authorized thereto, will sell by Public Auction on the farm Waterfall, near Leeuwfontein, division of Fort Beaufort, on Tuesday, the 18th April 1871,
1st – That splendid farm ‘Waterfall,’ adjoining BOTHA’s Post. Measuring 1920 Morgen.
On this farm stands a comfortable homestead, which was occupied by the deceased for many years. The Kat River bounds the farm, and out of it is led a water furrow, irrigating several acres of land, besides a large fruit garden and orangery. The veldt is covered with grass and spekboom, affording in the winter plenty of pasture for sheep, goats, and cattle.
2nd – The farm Inkerman situated in the division of Victoria East, near Breakfast Vley, measuring 1451 Morgen.
The capabilities of this farm are well known. It is remarkably healthy for sheep and stock of every description.
Remember the sale will take place on the farm Waterfall, a few minutes ride from Mrs. Fitzpatrick’s Hotel. Parties wishing to obtain particulars may apply to Mr. PETZER on the farm Waterfall.
COTTERELL & QUIN,
Auctioneers.

MISCELLANEOUS.

SOME MEMBERS of the Dutch Reformed Church at Aliwal have seceded, and have invited the Rev. Mr. KEIL, of Cape Town, to be the minister of a new Church they wish to found.

COMPLIMENTARY. – As a cab was returning to Cape Town from Sea Point a few nights since, two shots were fired at it, when opposite the Green Point common. One shot passed through the vehicle.

MR. ROLAND TRIMEN, F.Z.S., M.E.S., has been elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society.

CAUTION TO FARMERS. – On Wednesday last Mr. Daniel HUGO, a young farmer residing on the farm “Pokkraal,” in the Goudini, near Worcester, died after a few days’ dreadful suffering, from the effects of a virulent poison, with which he had in some way become inoculated in his arm while skinning an ox affected with what is called “giftziektie.” A brother of the deceased and a Hottentot servant, who assisted in skinning the affected animal, are also suffering from the effects of the poison, but are now thought to be out of danger. A few weeks back another farmer, named Christoffel du TOIT, died at Worcester from the same cause after suffering dreadful agony, and left a widow and large family entirely unprovided for. It is said that cattle expiring from “Giftziektie” generally fall dead without exhibiting any premonitory symptoms, and that putrification sets in so rapidly that in half an hour after death, the hair may be rubbed from any part of the animal’s body with the slightest friction. – Standard and Mail.

POSTSCRIPT.

THEFT. – On Friday night last, fifty goats were stolen out of the kraal of Mr. NEL, of Syferfontein. They were traced as far as Appies Drie, and apparently crossed the river at this point.

OFF TO THE DIAMOND FIELDS. – Several parties left this week for the Diamond Fields. Mr. D. MCKAY, formerly of Blinkwater, and Mr. M. HOLLIDAY started yesterday from here. Mr. W. RORKE starts from the Blinkwater to-day.

THE POST OFFICE. – We are glad to see that arrangements have been made to combine the post and telegraph offices under one head. Mr. BREMNER, who for several years has been postmaster, has resigned; and the appointment has been conferred on Mrs. BROWNING the telegraphs clerk. The post office is now removed to the building occupied by the Telegraph Company, and is consequently more centrally and conveniently situated.

MELANCHOLY DEATH BY ACCIDENT. – We were much grieved to hear by telegram, on Thursday, of the sudden death, by accident, of Mrs. Van BREDA, the wife of Mr. Dirk van BREDA of Kwartel River in Caledon. The deceased lady pulled down an old flint pistol from a shelf, catching it by the barrel. She had no idea of its being loaded, but by this movement the trigger went off and the charge shot into her breast, causing, as we are informed, almost immediate death. Mrs. van BREDA was much esteemed by all who knew her, and has left some six or seven children to lament their loss. Her husband is the son and heir of the late Hon. D. G. van BREDA and they were to enter on their new estate of Orangezigt within a few months. – Argus. – [The deceased was the sister of Mr. Attorney MORKEL of this town – Ed. F.B.A.

THYART. – Christian THYART was brought up on remand, at the Magistrate’s Court, on Tuesday, when the evidence of KAATJE only was taken. Nothing material was elicited from her. The magistrate after hearing her statement, said he had expected other evidence would be available, but as no more was forthcoming at present, and be considered there was sufficient in the statement of PANS and the present witness to send the matter to the Attorney-General, he would commit him for trial without calling for other evidence. Mr. COWEN requested that bail might be taken for the prisoner. The magistrate said he had doubts whether he could do so, but as he was not able to refer to the Attorney-General, and must decide within twenty four hours, he would give the prisoner the benefit of the doubt, and accept bail, the prisoner in £500, and three sureties of £500 each. THYART was therefore fully committed, but if his friends can find bail for him, he will spared incarceration in gaol till May next.

Saturday, April 8, 1871

ADVOCATE TELEGRAM.
Cape Town.
Advocate Office,
Fort Beaufort, April 4, 1871.
ROMAN ARRIVED LAST NIGHT.
Passengers for Algoa Bay:
Mr. and Mrs. MOSES,
Mr. WAYTON,
Mr. KIPPEN,
Mr. THORNLEE,
Mr. T. THORNLEE,
Mr. P. FINGSTEN and son,
Mr. BEARD,
Mr. SYES,
Mr. KUNNEBERG,
Mr. HORN,
Mr. E. THORN,
Mr. A. THORN.

MISCELLANEOUS.

WE ARE GLAD to hear that Lieut. WINTHROPP, of the 20th, who was stationed here, has been the lucky finder of a 37¾ carat diamond at Cawood’s Hope.

THE DIAMOND NEWS to band this week has been enlarged: it is now a decent-sized sheet of six columns. The appearance of the paper is on the whole creditable; and, from the number of advertisements, we judge that business is not very dull.

Mr. T. CLARKE, who for many years held a situation in the Military Store Department, has been appointed Gaoler at this place, - Mr. BREMNER having resigned. The new gaoler has already arrived from King Williamstown, where he was stationed, and entered upon his duties.

Mr. and Mrs. DUDLEY, who for several years have ably conducted schools for boys and girls in this town, have been appointed to the Government School at Adelaide. They left on Tuesday for their new residence. In saying that we regret their departure, we but express the feelings of the majority of the inhabitants, by whom Mr. and Mrs. DUDLEY were held in the highest esteem.

POLICE MOVEMENTS. – The Police are moving to the front. The Fort Beaufort troop, under Inspector GRANT, encamped at Lesseyton on Sunday. The troop from King Williamstown passed through here yesterday. These two troops together number over 200 men. There is a rumour that the whole of the Police are to return home, but we cannot trace it to any authentic source. – Free Press.

OVER THE KRANTZ. – A Dutchman names Volkers de LANGE of Wellsdale, Kat River, lost his wagon and 14 oxen on Wednesday week, which went over a krantz at the top of the Katberg, on the Readsdale side. He was going down with an empty wagon, when a storm of hail overtook him, and the oxen ran away. They could not be stopped, and over they went. The river below was red with blood of the oxen. Everything was smashed to atoms, all that he saved was the whip in his hand. The unfortunate man will lose about £150. The fall was about 500 feet. The leader was knocked down by the hailstones, and cut very much. – Ibid.

SERIOUS ACCIDENTS. – As Mr. George COOPER, of Whittlesea, was riding along the high road near Poplar Grove the other day, some half drunken natives galloped up from behind, knocking his hourse over with the rider, the horse tramping on the palm of his left hand. He was insensible for some time, - indeed, although it is said he shortly afterwards, assisted onto his horse, rode into Whittlesea, he does not remembers anything of it. Dr. THORNE is in attendance upon the sufferer, and has had to remove the middle finger altogether. The natives were returning from the release of stock from the Whittlesea pound, and had evidently imbibed freely on the occasion. – Master Frank LONG, son of Mr. James LONG, of the Junction Hotel, while in front of a buck-wagon proceeding along Cathcart road, a few days ago, was suddenly, on standing up to hit the front oxen, precipitated tot eh ground, the front wheel passing over his stomach. Fortunately no bones were broken, and the sufferer is doing well. The wagon, we are told, had about 3 000lbs. weight on it, which, with its own weight, we should have thought could not but have done serious damage. Fortunately, however, in this case it was not so. The accident took place near the store of Mr. A. C. BELL. – Representative.

DIAMOND INTELLIGENCE.
(From the Diamond News.)
THE MORNING MARKET at Pniel has been opened, but as yet no produce has been brought in.

THE WEATHER still continues exceedingly warm during the day, and thunderstorms are almost daily occurrence. The nights, however, are cool – sometimes even cold.
THE POLICE. – A body of some fifty or sixty of the Mounted Border Police, under Commandant JACKSON, arrived at Klip Drift on Monday morning last, and remain stationed there. A report was current a day or two ago, spread by the men themselves, that a detachment was to be stationed in Pniel, but as yet this has not been done.

ARRIVALS.
Messrs. PEARCE and HYLAND, from Port Elizabeth -
SHEPHERD and Company, from Port Elizabeth; all well –
HEPPELL, GOODWIN and LOWE, from Colesberg –
BRADFIELD, from Cradock –
BENJAMIN and nephew, from Grahamstown –
H. B. CHRISTIAN, WEBSTER, P. W. COURT, and WATTS, from Port Elizabeth.

FINDS.
The following are the finds reported since our last issued: -

SCHWAB, New Rush,

Gong Gong

1

10½

Do

Do

1

12¾

RUSSEL & VALENTINE,

Pniel

1

10½

Do

Do

1

Do

Do

1

Dr. de MORGAN

Do

1

 

Dr. HULL

Do

1

 

Capt. MACINTYRE

Do

1

1

J. W. BROPHY jun.

Do

1

9

JOLLIA and CLARK

Do

1

2

*

Do

1

*

Do

1

*

Do

1

2

*

Do

   

HEUGH

Do

1

 

A. H. SINCLAIR’s party

Do

1

1

Do

Do

1

 

GOLDING & MCDERMID

Do

1

1

Do

Do

1

Do

Do

1

Do

Do

1

Spes bona Company

Do

1

Do

Do

1

 

Do

Victoria

1

CHARLEY and DAWSON,

Colesberg Kop

1

*

Du Toit’s Pan

1

27

WINTHROP,

Cawood’s Hope

1

37¾

A. H. SINCLAIR’s party

Cawood’s Hope

1

 HEBRON.

R. DICK

1

2

Do

1

½

J. COWEL

1

1

BRAID and FLEMING

1

F. MARAIS

1

11⅞

NORTON

1

1⅜

BELL

1

BASVEL

1

4

DONALDSON Company

1

QUESTEAD

1

2

Do

1

1

JANSON

1

T. S. COLLEY

1

C. DICKINSON

1

MULLER

1

1

FINLAYSON

1

10½

MORRIS

1

DOUGLASS

1

W. MEYER

1

Do

1

2

WICKS and DANIELS

1

 SEVONELL.

MANSFIELD

1

VOELGESANG

1

1

Natal Company

1

DAVIDSON

1

17

VOELGESANG

1

¼

MANSFIELD

1

1

H. GLYNN, jun.

1

2

B. NEETHLING

1

NIEUWKIRK

1

¾

Do

1

¾

H. GLYNN

1

½

POSTSCRIPT.

Yesterday being Good Friday, the stores and places of business were closed.

ARRIVED. – Mr. Geo JACKSON has arrived from the Diamond Fields. His party have had a fair share of success.

THE DIAMOND CASE. – Mr. W. ESTMENT appeared on Thursday, and the evidence of several witnesses subpoenaed by the Crown, was taken. The estimated value of the diamond has dwindled from £2,000 to £200. The accused was remanded to appear when called for.

THE WRECK OF THE Queen of the Thames, together with the cargo, which alone was valued at £60,000, realised £15,000. Messrs. DUNNELL, EBDEN & Co., of Port Elizabeth, are the purchasers. The sale took place on the beach in the vicinity of the wreck.

FORT BEAUFORT MINERAL BATHS.
John DELMAN provides a large Hut (Clean and commodious), and large Bath with water as desired.
Charge 6d; cup of coffee, with milk and sugar, 3d.
Nearest way – through Dorrington’s Drift.
Sign-board over hut.

IN THE ESTATE OF THE LATE HENRY FULLER.
The undersigned has received instructions to sell on the Market Square, Bedford, on Saturday, 8th April next, at 11 o’clock, a.m., precisely, all the moveable property in the above Estate, comprising –
One Horse, saddle, and bridle,
One silver watch,
One Albert chain,
One Chest drawers,
Easy Chairs, &c., &c., &c.
C. W. HUTTON, Auctioneer.
Bedford, March 29, 1871.

Saturday, April 15, 1871

CIRCULAR.
The undersigned begs respectfully to inform his old customers, friends, and the public generally, that he has again commenced Business in Fort Beaufort, in those premises formerly occupied by Mr. EWING, and recently by Mr. RUSHBY, next door to the Telegraph Office.
James SCOTT,
Fort Beaufort, 15th April, 1871.

ODDFELLOWS ARMS HOTEL
By M. MEADE, Campbell St., Fort Beaufort.
Good accomodation for Travellers.
Wines of the best description always kept pn the premises.

MISCELLANEOUS.

THE CIRCUIT COURT, which will sit on Monday next, will be held in one of the Sanitarium Huts.

THE CEREMONY observed by the Kafirs in introducing their youth who have arrived at the age of puberty to the rights and privileges of manhood, are now being celebrated beyond the Brak River. The “Amaquatos” may be daily seen performing their dances.

HIGHWAY ROBBERY: - A carrier named HICKEY, residing near East London, was set upon by two men whom he emplyed as driver and leader, and robbed of his purse containg fifty pounds in notes. The thieves have been apprehended, having in their possession part of the stolen money, and goods bought with some of it.

WANTON DESTRUCTION. – Some malicious person or persons entered the premises of Mr. H. CALLAGHAN one night during the week, and wantonly destroyed the spokes, fellies, &c., of a new wagon whoch was standing under a shed. Both Mr. and Mrs. CALLAGHAN were away, and the only occupant of the dwelling was a young lad of about 14. No clue has yet been obtained of the perpetrators.

TERRIBLE TRAGEDY. – The inhabitants of the town were shocked to learn on Friday sennight, that Dr. BREDA had committed an assault upon his wife by stabbing her with a dissecting knife, and thereby inflicting an extensive and dangerous wound in the groin. For a time it was hoped the wound would not prove fatal, but these hopes proved fallacious by the death of Mrs. BREDA on Monday morning about half-past six. A post mortem examination on the body of the deceased was held on Monday by Drs. PALMER and ALLEN, and the interment took place the following day, a large number of the inhabitants following the remains of deceased to the grave. The particulars of this painful tragedy are only parially known as yet, and we deem it advisable not to repeat all the gossip that is afloat upon the subject. The facts will doubtless be brought out in the examination of the unfortunate accused, who is now in prison, when it will be time enough to disclose them in print. We may state, however, that a condition of what may be called chronic intemperance may have had some influence in bringing about the fatal deed which resulted in the death of Mrs. BREDA.

DIAMOND INTELLIGENCE.
(From the Diamond News.)
SANTANNA’S CIRCUS has arrived at Pniel.

COUNTERFEIT COIN. – We hear that a great quantity of false coin is in circulation at Hebron, and that people there are becoming very suspicious of all hard cash, in consequence. The sovereigns are – or, rather, profess to be – Australian, and can only be told by the ring.

FINDS AT PNIEL. – Several good finds have been reported from Du Toit’s Pan this week. In addition to those which figure in our list, it is said that one of 73 carats was unearthed on Thursday last. The finder only showed the gem to one individual – a Committee man – who will not disclose his name.

DEATH AT PNIEL. – It is our painful duty to record another death at Pniel, this week. Mrs. STUBBS, of Albania, who was sojourning with her husband in this Camp, expired rather suddenly on Tuesday last. We have not yet learnt what was the cause of death.

‘QUEENSTOWN ENTERPRISE’ – Messrs. SMITH and VENABLES have discovered a ‘new rush,’ about five miles above Cawood’s Hope, on the same side of the river, to which the above name has been given, and the discoverers have had prospecting claims granted to them by the Cawood’s Hope Committee.

EFFECTS OF THE LATE RAIN. – The effects of the two days’ rain are painfully visible in the Camps, more especially so at Klip Drift. Mr. HARPER’s tenement there completely collapsed; a corner of the Post-Office ‘caved in’; the walls of Messrs. BACH and RAPHAEL’s new building, just ready for the roof, fell down; a portion of Mr. SCHIFFMAN’s stone wall fell in; and several other places either totally or partially melted away. At Pniel, Mr. Dixon’s oven dissolved; but we have not heard of any further injury caused by the wet.

GREAT ROBBERY AT KLIP DRIFT. – On Thursday evening last, between the hours of 8 and 10 o’clock, a daring robbery was committed at one of the stores of Messes. HILL and PADDON, Klip Drift. This firm occupies two stores – one built of galvanized iron at the upper end, and a canvas store at the lower end of town. Mr. PADDON, who was in charge of the canvas store, closed his door at 8 p.m., and went up to the upper store on business. On returning at about 10 o’clock, he found that a large hole had been cut in the end of the tent. Before entering the store, Mr. PADDON noticed what he thought to be a woman, entering the sluit below his store. On opening his door, and lighting a candle, he immediately discovered that a robbery had been committed. A large bundle of goods lay on the counter in a blanket, ready to be conveyed away, and a man’s hat lay on the floor close to the opening. Securing this, he immediately ran out and down to the sluit previously mentioned. Here he found that what he had taken for a female figure, was, in reality, another large bundle of goods wrapped up in a blanket. Returning to the store, he found that in addition to the goods, the thief, or thieves, had made off with his cash box, containing about £200 in cash, cheques, post office orders, &c. He immediately gave information to the police, and in the course of the evening apprehended the man, having on a new waistcoat, which, on examination proved to have a ticket on it, bearing Messrs. HILL’s and PADDON private mark. The man, who is in custody, affirms that he bought the waistcoat three months ago, but had never put it on until that day. Up to the time of our going to press, no further evidence against him had been elicited, nor had the cash box been recovered. It appears, however, that suspicion has fallen upon a man named James MOORE, of Mooney, and a warrant has been issued for his apprehension.

ARRIVALS. – Mr. J. THACKWRAY and family, Messrs. VICARY and John ARMSTRONG, from Cradock;
Dr. ADAMS, from Simon’s Town;
Dr. Edie, and Dr. GIBSON;
Mr. B. HOOLE, from Grahamstown.

DEPARTURES. – Messrs. M. L. PINEUS and H. B. CHRISTIAN, for Bloemfontein;
Mr. le ROY, for Mauritius;
Mr. Joel MYERS, for Port Elizabeth.

FINDS.
The following are the finds reported since our last issue: -
At Pniel:

Perseverance Co.

1 of

10 carats;

Do

1 of

5;

FLER,

1 of

1½;

Do

1 of

½;

Dr. HALL,

1 of

1¼;

JAKINS,

2;

 

SINCLAIR’s party,

1 of

1;

Do

1;

 

Capt. MCINTYRE,

1 of

1¼;

Colesberg Kop:

CHARLEY and DAWSON,

1 of

4¼;

Do

1 of

1¼;

Do

1 of

1⅜;

Victoria:

Spes Bona Company,

1 of

3¼;

Do

1 of

½;

Cawood’s Hope:

SCHRIENER,

1 of

9¾;

Du Toit’s Pan:

STEWART,

3;

 

W. SHORT,

1 of

28;

J. J. van NIEKERK

1 of

50.

HEBRON. – The following are the finds at Hebron for the week ending 25th March: -

LERUSSONE,

1 of

1½ carats;

Do

1 of

2;

G. VENTER,

1 of

4½;

T. NICOL,

1 of

3½;

Do

1 of

2½;

CAMERON,

1 of

4;

FORRESTER,

1 of

1;

Do

1 of

1;

DICKINSON & DAVIS,

1 of

3;

DONOGHUE

1 of

1;

Do

1 of

1¼;

GOORUTER,

1 of

2½;

Geo. THORNE,

1 of

2½;

Do

1 of

1½;

LAMSDEN,

1 of

3⅛;

F. S. VOTER,

1 of

11¼;

WATTS,

1 of

2;

MORRIS,

1 of

5¼;

BOWLES and DELL,

1 of

1¼.

ADVOCATE TELEGRAM.
(The following was issued to a portion of our Subscribers by Saturday’s post.)
Advocate Office,
Fort Beaufort, April 8, 1871.
CAPE TOWN.
“SWEDEN” arrived yesterday from England in twenty-seven days.
Forty-two passengers,
“Saxon” had left Plymouth two hours before.
Passengers for Algoa Bay – Mr. STANLY,
Miss SWITZER,
Miss JAMES,
Mr. and Mr. NATHAN & servant,
Mr. NATHAN,
Mr. NATHAN,
Mr. HARTLEY,
Mr. PIRIE,
Mr. REED,
Mr. THON,
Mr. ROFF,
Mr. STOPFORD,
Mr. KELLER,
Mr. BROMLEY,
Mr. BERNARD HARRIS.
Natal – Mr. and Mrs. SEAWARD.

POSTSCRIPT.

THE GREAT TABB. – This diamond has been sold at home for £1,000. Messrs. TABB and WILLIAMSON, the finders, were offered £1,800 on the fields for the gem soon after finding it.

LAND AT NATAL. – A 4,000 acre farm in the neighbourhood of the Klip River, known as par excellence the wool and wheat producing districts, was sold on the public market the other day at Pietermaritzburg for £55, - under 3¾d per acre.

HOUSEBREAKING IN BEAUFORT-STREET. – On Sunday night, during the temporary absence of Mr. C. H. HUNTLEY and family from town, the residence of that gentleman was broken into, and a number of articles stolen, all of which were fortunately recovered before the burglar had time to leave the neighbourhood. – Journal.

DIAMOND MINING. – The machinery belonging to Mr. RAYMOND, just landed at the Cape from the Peony, consists of steam boilers, engines, sieves, and pumps for raising water from the river to the mines. The whole of the machinery is portable, being on wheels, and can with little difficulty be moved place to place. Mr. RAYMOND is a son of the editor of the New York Times, and intends carrying on mining operations at the diamond fields on a large scale.

THE NEW YEAR’S part of the Gentleman’s Journal contains an account of the Diamond Fields, together with a sketch of the diggers at work on the Vaal. The account, which, is mainly composed of and founded upon, extracts of letters, &c., from the Cape, is on the whole correct. The preference is accorded to the Cape Town route over that of Port Elizabeth. The drawing gives but a faint idea of what really occurs along the banks of the Vaal; the beautiful trees which give a welcome shade to so many, are not to be seen.

Saturday, April 22, 1871

MISCELLANEOUS.

MR. J. QUIN, M.L.A. leaves for Cape Town next week, via the Diamond fields.

Mr. R. RORKE, M.L.A. leaves via Port Elizabeth for Cape Town on Monday next.

THE FARM WATERFALL, in extent measuring 2000 morgen, was sold by auction by COTTERELL and QUIN on Tuesday last, in the deceased estate of A. ACKERMAN, for £680 – Mr. Thomas WARD being the purchaser. £500 we believe was offered for the farm Inkerman in the same estate but it was not sold. The stock realized very good prices.

THEATRICAL. – The amateurs gave a representation on Tuesday evening of the pieces “To Paris and back for £5” and “More free than welcome.” The characters were not so fully sustained as on former occasions; but we suppose that must be an account of the performance having been rather hurriedly got up. Mr. Justice SMITH and the Advocates on Circuit were present.

MR. LLOYD, of Peddie, has fifty diamonds weighing 66 carats, all of excellent quality; the result of a seven months visit to the fields.

THE DIAMOND FIELDS.
BULTFONTEIN AND DU TOIT’S PAN.
These two farms, adjoining each other, are now the property of one individual, representing several shareholders. At the time I was at Du Toit’s Pan, it belonged to a Dutch farmer named van WYK, who opened his farm to all comers. Bultfontein was worked by a party of natives, and the distance between the diggings on the two farms was about a thousand yards. For some time after the opening of Du Toit’s Pan the finds were not so great as to give much encouragement to diggers, consequently frequent visits were paid to the neighbouring farm; and, although the finds were kept secret, the diggers came to the conclusion that it would be worth their while to try. Some half dozen ventured the hazardous step, despite the warning received and threatening, messages dispatched by the owners. The success of the half dozen soon became a notorious fact, and by degrees the diggers at Bultfontein numbered nearly six hundred, having a committee, &c. The day on which we arrived these diggers, or jumpers as they are called, turned out in force to adopt measures for the protection of their committee, who, it was said, were to be seized and sacrificed at the altar or Justice for the misdeeds done by the jumpers, whom they represented. The Bultfontein force was joined by those on the opposite side, - most of them having come out of mere curiosity. Resolutions were passed, and the excitement was at a high pitch, when the wife of the chairman of the committee forced a passage through the crowd, and with rifle in hand, paraded the claims, threatening to bring matters to a close argumentum baculinum. The unexpected appearance of a champion from the ranks of the weaker sex, so astonished all parties that a general break up was effected without bloodshed.
In a few days after this gathering internal quarrels began to create a disunion, which ended in the committee absconding with the money received from the jumpers for claims, amounting to a hundred and fifty pounds. Rumours were prevalent that a commando of five hundred men had been called out to drive the jumpers off Bultfontein. The jumpers were perfectly aware that right was not on their side, - the fact of their leaders deserting them being a too convincing proof; they, therefore, resolved to give up their illegal work. Within a few days only a solitary jumper was seen here and there, working up the remaining portion of the claim. Fifty police had been raised at Pniel by the Free State Government, and despatched with haste to Bultfontein. The object of sending this small body of men, who had not a single fire-arm amongst them, seemed so ridiculous that the diggers on many occasions insulted them. These police, however, proved in the end more troublesome than the jumpers; and after committing sundry assaults, they were marched back to Pniel.
The time fixed for the appearance of the much talked-of commando drew near. I was anxious to see these braves turn out. It was on a bright Monday morning that the Boshof contingent assembled at the rendezvous. They mustered about thirty strong – some on horseback, some in carts, &c. A brave lot they seemed as they filed past the now deserted claims to a spot where a halt was to be made. The fierceness with which they eyed the heaps of sands – the only enemy to be seen – was sufficient to strike terror into the hearts of the three hundred and more jumpers, were they only present. I happened to be present when the commandant of the troop was informed that the enemy had fled, and there was no work for his braves. Scanning the expression of several, I noticed that they brightened up wonderfully, and signed with an amount of satisfaction too evident to be mistaken for grief at not having a chance to exhibit their prowess. To attempt to give any idea of the quantity of tall-talk indulged in by the warriors flushed with Basuto victories, after hearing the good news, would only lead you into the belief that I was exaggerating; therefore, I shall leave them to indulge in their own idea of their valour and importance, hoping that the fable of the bull and the frog may never be so far exemplified as to cause any fatal consequences. An inspection of some of the cart boxes of the commando, discovered a supply of grapes, &c., which the lucky owners retailed to the diggers and others inclined to buy. Their vrouens had evidently not allowed themselves to be wholly absorbed by grief as to forget that a good trade might be done by their warriors in selling the produce of their gardens among the diggers, as well as to repel the invader.
Du Toit’s Pan is well supplied with shops and stores, to supply the wants of the sixteen hundred diggers. Queen’s Town is represented by STOWE, the brewer, geologist, &c., who is always ready to assist in quenching, with Queen’s Town ale, the peculiar sensation experienced by diggers on a hot summer day. If you want to have a diamond accurately weighed, or if you have one to dispose of, STOWE’s the man. In fact, he is the man for everybody, and fully sustains the reputation of the town from which he hails. Graaff-Reinet has contributed too; and OEHSE, the man who zealously neglects no opportunity of advancing the interest of the capital of the Midland district, displays to the gaze of all a large canvas shed, inside which he professes to keep everything required by a digger. He has the good fortune of being established in a central position, all among the claims. Nothing comes amiss to him – even Bass’s draught ale is on tap. Whether the demand has exceeded the supply, I don’t know, but when I last tasted it, the idea would force itself on me that somebody has been trying his hand at improving Bass’s receipt, the result of which, however, was, a conviction that the original receipt tasted better and purer.
CALLAGHAN is another Graaff-Reineter, and his stock embraces the usual assortment from a needle to an anchor; despising the usual canvas covering, he has erected an iron house. The Western Province are well represented, if one might judge from the numerous wagons laden with hinds, along side each of which is a small canvass tent. Passing there at any time one can see the door, opened as widely as the circumstances allow, - a table stands a few feet off, and on it there are sundry glasses, bottles, &c., all silent witnesses of the business done.
Du Toit’s Pan is a very health place, nevertheless a philanthropist came to the wise conclusion that people sometimes get ill even in the healthiest of places, and he travelled all the way from the Paarl to be near at hand in case his services should be required. The shops at Du Toit’s Pan are situated in various parts of the camp, facing all directions. The camp is mainly composed of wagons and small tents, which are moved as circumstances require. Streets there are none, and the only permanent building is the waddle-and-daub occupied by the owner of the farm. – To be continued.

DIAMOND INTELLIGENCE.
(From the Diamond News.)
HOSPITAL AT KLIP DRIFT. – Exertions are being made for the establishment of a hospital at Klip Drift. Mr. JACKSON, the Acting Special Magistrate, has interested himself in the matter, and has already obtained subscription to a considerable amount.

THE VALUE OF BLUEBACKS. – At Mr. van KRAUT’s auction sale a few days ago, a “blueback” was put up which, after some spirited bidding, was knocked down at 18s. The Boers present held up their hands in amazement and delight.

DIAMOND MATRIX. – A remarkable geological specimen, found at Du Toit’s Pan, is now in the possession of Captain FINLAYSON. It consists of a core, of some substance or another, studded with several diamonds. Mr, TOBIA, who has seen the specimen, pronounces it to consist of a core of silicate or cornelian, in which the diamonds have become embedded whilst in a state of fusion. The weight of the whole is about 20 carats. Possibly this may prove of service in solving the much vexed question as to the true diamond matrix.

MR. THOMAS WILLIAM TOBIN, of the Royal Polytechnic Institution, London, whose anticipated visit we noticed some time ago, has arrived at Pniel during the last few days. Mr. TOBIN came through Natal, and has examined the sources of the Vaal, in the Drakensberg, following its source almost uninterruptedly to his place. He gives it at his opinion that the whole source of the stream will prove diamondiferous. Wherever they touch the river the indications were precisely the same. Mr. TOBIN remains out here for some time, investigating the discovery from a scientific point of view, and preparing illustrated lectures on the subject.

SOME LITTLE CONSTERNATION has been created amongst the storekeepers at Pniel by the notice issued by Mr. WURNS requiring all Stand licences to be paid to him. Mr. JACKSON has been appealed to by the Pniel Committee as to whether in the event of the diggers paying their licences to him they would be protected by him, and Mr. JACKSON had replied that he was prepared to issue licences to British subjects, holding the money in trust, and to protect them as much.

AN ENGLISHMAN named William HENRY had been wounded by a pistol shot from a Kafir whom he was pursuing at Hebron. The Kafir was subsequently brought before Mr. JACKSON and fined £5.

A YOUNG MAN about twenty years of age (name not given) has been found drowned in the Vaal near Hebron and foul play is suspected.

THE FOLLOWING are the finds reported since out last issue: -

NELSON & HOLLAND

 

1

5

DO

 

1

DO

 

1

2

DO

 

1

½

SINCLAIR

 

1

HEUGH

 

2

 

Dr. HALL

 

1

 

HARRIS

 

2

 

LASSIE

 

3

 

ECKFORD & RUTHERFORD

 

1

2⅛

BROWN

Cawood’s Hope

1

22½

*

Upper Gong-Gong

1

2

*

Do

2

2

*

Do

1

¼

HEBRON.

The following are the finds at Hebron for the week ending 1st April: -

POTGIETER

1

BONGSTRONE

1

UIJA

1

4

MEYER

1

FARLIE

1

13

COOKE

1

STARKEY

1

5

WHITEHEAD

1

6

STERLEY’s Company

1

2

Do

1

DELL & BOWLES

1

1

DANIEL & WICKS

1

Do

1

1

Do

1

3⅜

Do

1

1

Do

1

1

JACKSON

1

12

MARIAS

1

3

DONOGHUE &Bro.

1

DO

1

1

MCDONALD

1

HEINTJIES

1

2

HAYWARD

1

TURNER & GILFILLAN

1

In addition to the above we learn privately that Mr. James SMITH, a son of Mr. J. O. SMITH, of Port Elizabeth, is the fortunate possessor of a fine ruby of 89 carats.

POSTSCRIPT.

Mr. CROSBY, Registrar of the Eastern Districts’ Court, arrived here yesterday morning, for the purpose of holding a preliminary investigation into the circumstances attending the death of Mrs. van BREDA. At 10 a.m. yesterday Dr BREDA was placed in the dock, and the examination of witnesses was proceeded with by Mr. CROSBY. The first witness called was the servant girl of Dr. BREDA, Catherine COLEMAN. She corroborated the disposition she swore to before Mr. ASHBURNHAM, J.P. Mrs. KING, wife of Constable King, was the next witness examined. Mrs. DORNAN, nurse, who attended Mrs. BREDA, then gave her evidence. Dr. ALLEN’s evidence followed. The knife with which the fatal wound was inflicted was produced. The evidence given by the several witnesses will be published hereafter. When we put to press the examination had not concluded. Mr. CRISBY called upon the witnesses to give security for their appearance.
BISHOP RICARDS. – The Right Rev. Dr. RICARDS has received from Rome his appointment as Vicar Apostolic, and the ball designating him Bishop of Rhitymuè. His consecration will take place as soon as Bishop ALLARD, of Basutoland and Natal, can arrange to come to Graham’s Town. – Journal.

REPORTED CAPTURE OF WHITE. – By the brig Sea Nymph, which arrived at East London on Friday morning, information was received that Walter Nairne WHITE, charged with fraud on the Port Elizabeth Bank, had been captured in Natal. No particulars are yet to hand, but as the Sea Nymph is daily expected at this port, we shall shortly be in possession of fuller particulars, if the rumour prove correct. – E. P. Herald.

DIAMOND FARMS. – A draft ordinance is to be prepared by a Commission to be laid before the Raad at its May cession, by which the owners of diamond farms are to be compelled to relinquish to Government a portion of the licences to dig, for which the Government shall undertake the levying or collection of the same; or otherwise authorising the Government to take over such farms at a fair valuation.

INQUIRY. – We are informed that the Attorney-General has directed that an official inquiry should be made by the magistrate of Caledon into the circumstances under which Mrs. BREDA, wife of Mr. D. G. van BREDA, of Ratel River, lost her life. As represented at the time some three weeks ago, the unfortunate lady had pulled down a loaded pistol from a shelf, and the weapon was discharged accidently but fatally into her breast. It is but right for all parties that a thorough investigation should be made. – Argus.

SALE OF LANDED PROPERTY. – At the sale of landed property belonging to Mr. ELLA, held on the 11th instant, there was a goodly company present. Klein Vontyn farm including Junction Hotel, after spirited bidding, was knocked down to Mr. CALLAGHAN, of Fort Beaufort, for £1,570. The purchaser has to pay the auction and government dues, transfer expenses, and expenses of advertising which may, possibly, in round numbers make the cost £1,700. It was sold privately some years since to Mr. ELLA for £750. Mr. ELLA must have spent from £300 to £400 in enlarging the hotel and in other improvements. When he bought it the Diamond Fields were in their infancy. Possession was promised within a month. The residence of Mr. MELLIAR and the adjoining property, occupied by Mrs. RELLY, were declared not sold at £360. None of the other valuable properties were sold; but we believe, Mr. WELLA is open to a good offer privately, either direct, or through the auctioneer, Mr. F. B. BROWN.

BIRTH. – At Adelaide on the 20th inst., the wife of Mr. A. Sumner DUDLEY, of a Son.

Saturday, April 29, 1871

MISCELLANEOUS.

A REMARKABLE FACT. – There were no criminal or civil cases to be heard on Thursday.

SNOW. – The Winterberg mountains have been covered with snow this week. The Katberg was also covered, - the snow being in some places four feet deep.

MR. D. WATSON, of Alice, we are glad to state, is progressing favourably. The fractured arm has been set by Dr. ATHERSTONE, and the injuries are less serious than was at first supposed.

LOCUSTS. – An immense flight of locusts passed over the town in a north-westerly direction on Saturday afternoon. We have never seen a more dense flight of these destructive insects than on this occasion.

WE WISH TO correct a statement made in our last issue respecting the insufficient supply of stationery during the sitting of the Circuit Court. We are informed than an ample supply of writing and blotting paper was issued from the public officer, for the occasion, some of which was returned by the Deputy Sheriff.

THE CAPTURE OF WHITE. – The capture of Walter Nairne WHITE, in custody on a charge of embezzelement, and who effected his escape from the Port Elizabeth gaol on the night of March 1, 1870, it announced in the Natal papers. It appears that WHITE, after making his escape from durance vile, proceeded to the diamond-fields, where he was seen and recognised by several Bayonians. Finding his position getting too war, to be pleasant, he made the best of his way to the Portugese settlements on the East Coast, where he was prostrated by fever. While on a trading trip to Inhambane, Mr. PENINGFIELD, of Durban, found him sick and friendless and gave him a passage down to Natal, where he went into hospital. During the temporary illness of the Superintendent, he acted in that capacity, and, after leaving was for some time a guest in the house of Mr. MANN. After a few weeks’ stay he took passage on board the brig Jane Bell, Capt. OSBORNE, for Mauritius, but before he could get away, Mr. MAXWELL, the Superintendent of Police at Durban, had received certain information, which, led to his arrest. On being arrested he made no attempt at denial, but gave his name as Walter Nairne WHITE. He arrived here in the Princes Alice, in charge Constable T GREEN, ;ast evening, and was this morning landed and conveyed to the New Prison. He will be brought before the Resident Magistrate in the course of the day.

DIAMOND INTELLIGENCE.
(From the Diamond News.)
Mr. W. J. EARLE, late of Grahamstown died at the residence of his brother-in-law, Mr. Robt. Read, at Klip Drift on Friday, the 7th inst. Mr. EARLE had been for some time suffering from an abscess in the leg, which at last terminated fatally.

THE HEBRON MURDER. – It seems to be established that the young man (HALL), whose body was found last week in the river above Hebron, has been foully murdered. Suspicion points to four white men as the perpetrators, three of whom are in custody, whilst search is being made for the fourth. One of these was apprehended at Pniel by Mr. TRUTER’s police, and handed over by the Free State authorities to Mr. JACKSON. Money is supposed to have been the object of the murder.

PNIEL HOSPITAL. – During the past week the Rev. Mr. STEGGMANN has been zealously exerting himself in the matter of the proposed hospital at Pniel. We are not aware that his efforts have yet been rewarded by any substantial results in the shape of extra funds; but a meeting will be held next week, and if the Committee can see their way clear to the erection of any kind of building suitable for the purpose, it will at once be proceeded with. Will not our friends in the colony, - those who have relatives here, for whom there is no provision in case of sickness, - do something in the way of raising subscriptions towards this very desirable object?

PNIEL MARKET. – The morning market at Pniel was inaugurated yesterday morning by the sale of three or four loads of produce, the property of Mr. James ATTWELL, of Battlesden, near Alice, who arrived with his wagons and party two or three days ago. The following were the prices realised;
Forage, 8d per bundle;
Potatoes, 25s per sack;
Seed Oats, 16s do;
Barley, 18s do;
Flour, 25s 6d per 100 lbs.;
Yellowwood plank 8s;
Quartering; 7s 6d per length;
Butter, 9d (not sold);
Pumpkins, 1s 6d each;
The whole realising £105.

ACCIDENT AT KLIPDRIFT. – A sad accident happened yesterday afternoon at Mr. Francis THOMPSON’s new store, Klip Drift. Three loads of goods, which had arrived during the morning, had been put on the ground floor, beneath which three men were occupied in excavating a cellar. During the afternoon, the floor suddenly gave way and fell in, burying the unfortunate men amongst the debris. It was some time before they could be rescued, during which their groans were painfully audible to those engaged in removing the good. When at last released, it was found that they were all more or less injured, one poor fellow having his thigh terrible smashed.

FINDS.

The following are the finds reported since our last issue: -

At Pniel: 

R. ARDERNE,

1 diamond of`

4¼ carats;

 

Do

1

 
 

JAKINS,

2

3

 

BENJAMIN,

5

¾

 

LAWRANCE

1

 
 

RYMER

1

 

DO

1

 
 

DO

1

½

 

Spes Bona Co.

1

1

 

DO

1

 

Victoria:

Do

1

Gong-Gong New Rush:

VALENTINE & HAMILTON,

1

   

1

   

1

1

   

2

 

Cawood’s Hope:

SCHOLTZ and Co.

1

11½

   

1

2

   

1

   

1

1

   

1

¾

 

PAGEL & MCINTYRE,

1

22½

 

SPALDING & MITCHELL

1

 

KENNEDY Bros.

1

8

 

SMITH

1

14½

Lower Gong-Gong:

A Native,

1

33

 

*

1

40

 

NELSON,

1

Sivonell:

DAVIS

1

5

   

1

   

1

1

 

GLYNN,

1

23

 

MCDONALD,

3

8

Du Toit’s Pan:

H. PHILIPS,

1

12½

   

1

3

 

KLEINHAN’S

1

16

   

1

 

J. ALLRIG

1

   

1

4

 

H. C. VERMEULEN,

1

 

Capt. FINLAYSON,

1

1

 

J. D. DAVY,

1

5

 

B. BANTJES,

1

   

1

 

J. QUIN

1

 

HOUD’s Party

1

4

   

4

 

C. F. ROTHMAN,

2

 

D. PRITCHARD,

1

4⅜

   

1

 

Merry Party or Devil’s Own,

14

 

Hebron:

George THOM,

1

 

WATTS,

1

3

 

FINLAYSON,

1

   

1

1⅜

 

BURNETT,

1

2

 

MURPHY,

1

1

 

CURRY & Co.,

1

1

   

1

2

 

N. DANIEL & Co.,

1

2⅛

   

1

1⅜

   

1

1⅛

   

1

   

1

2

   

1

1

   

1

   

1

2

   

1

 

MUIN & Co.,

1

7⅜

   

1

4

 

MCGREGOR,

1

2

 

ROWES,

1

 

HAYBOTTLE,

1

1

 

HENDRICKSON,

1

10

 

HINTON,

1

 

DELL & BOWES,

1

2

 

Webster,

1

DIAMONDS. – A trustworthy authority from Winburg informs us, for a positive fact that diamonds have been picked up at seventeen different places along the Vet River, between Winburg and the junction of the above river with the Vaal. The same authority states, that there is no well-authenticated instance of these precious stoned having been found along the banks of the Vaal higher up than the junction with it of the Vet. A company is being formed to dig at likely spots along the Vet River. - Friend

POSTSCRIPT.

DIAMOND DIGGERS. – A large party (about twenty) passed through here yesterday en route to the Fields. We believe they are from Scotland and Australia.

A RAID has been made amongst the shopkeepers and dealers in Cape Town for not taking licences out in due time. All, with a few exceptions, were fined from £1 upwards.

RESULT OF THE BLOEMHOF ARBITRATION. – A correspondent writing to the Era under date Klipdrift, 5 p.m. Thursday, 20th April, 1871, says: - Through the kindness of Mr. R. W. MURRAY, sen., I am enable to give you the news that the Bloemhof Arbitration case is settled. WATERBOER’s claims to all the disputed territory could not be sustained. The other native chiefs have, however, made out their case satisfactorily, and the British government is now in possession on this (Klipdrift) side of the Vaal River. – No large finds reported.

PROFESSOR BLACKIE’S TEST OF SANITY.
At a meeting at Edinburg, on Saturday evening, Professor BLACKIE said, - If a man wanted to test whether he was in the right frame of mind or not, let him ask himself whether he loved the rosebud in spring, whether he loved the laugh of a little child nor play boy, and whether he loved the ring of good “auld Scotch songs;” and if he could honestly say that he liked all these things, or one of the three, this he would say that the Evil One was not near the back of his neck, but very far away from him. (Laughter and cheers.)

Saturday, May 6, 1871

GOVERNMENT GAZETTE.
NOTICE.
Return of Licences issued by the Distributor of Stamps, Fort Beaufort, during the month of April, 1871: -
Retail Wine and Spirit Licences, ending 31st March 1872:
£30.
Fort Beaufort.
Mary DORNAN, D’Urban-street
A WRAGG, do
C HOLLIDAY, sen., do
F. GODDARD, do
M MEADE, Campbell-street
R. STANFORD, do
POTE and BLEWITT, do
A B COHEN, do
J. O’GARA
E. HENNEMEYER, Adelaide
J. MIDGELY, No. 4, Block D, Market-sq., do
J. W. DALTON, Barrack-st. Fort Beaufort
£10.
M. BAKER, Blinkwater
A. FERGUSON, Yellowwoods
E. P. WAYLAND, Winterberg Outspan.
Butchers’ Licences, £3 15s, ending 31st. December, 1871.
J MCKENZIE, Adelaide
F C de KLERK, do
J. WHITECROSS, Fort Beaufort.
Wholesale and Retail Licences, £4, ending 1st January, 1872:
E. HENNEMEYER, Adelaide,
HOWSE, REYNOLDS &Co., Fort Beaufort
BAKER, BAKER &Co., Adelaide.
Retail Shop Licences, £1 10s, ending 31st December, 1871:
J. R. SPARKS, Adelaide
Jas. SCOTT, Fort Beaufort.
Game Licences, 7s 6d, ending 31st Dec, 1871:
N. SABO, Fort Beaufort District
J D QUIN, do
M D SAVORY, do
W. R. PIERS, Dis. Stamps.
Stamp Office,
Fort Beaufort, 3rd May, 1871.

NOTICE.
List of Licences issued by the Distributor of Stamps at Stockenstrom during the month of April, 1871:-
Wine and Spirit Licences, to expire 31st March, 1872:
W. H. BATES, at Seymour, Hotel and Accommodation House (£30).
J. BYERS, at Katberg, Hotel and Accommodation House (£12 10s)
Geo. G. MEURANT, Dis. Stamps.
Stamp Office,
Seymour, 3rd May, 1871.

IMPORTANT AND EXTENSIVE SALE OF LANDED PROPERTY, LIVE STOCK, &C.
In the Estate of the late Rynier Christiaan van ROOYEN of the Upper Blinkwater, in the Division of Stockenstrom.
The undersigned, duly instructed by the Executrix Testamentary in the above Estate, will sell by public auction, at the residence of the Widow van ROOYEN, at Upper Blinkwater, on Thursday, the 25th May, 1871, at 10 o’clock a.m. punctually, the following valuable properties in the Estate.
First – That superior erf at Ebenezer East, marked No. 3 on General Plan of the Settlement. Containing eighteen morgen and nine square roods of land, with right of grazing over the extensive Commonage of the Location.
This is one of the most extensive properties in the district, and might, with a little enterprise, be made one of the most valuable. An irrigating pump is all that is needed to enable the future proprietor to cultivate the broad acres of this farm, purchased by a late owner at a cost of £1,100, as may be found on the reference to the Deed of Transfer.
Second – That well-known Property, situate at Ebenezer West, originally granted to J. F. MENTZ; being the Erf No. 5, in extent 7 morgen and 377 square roods.
A large and substantial Homestead, under corrugated iron enhances the value of this Property.
Third – That admirable Erf, Lot No. 8, also situate at Ebenezer West, with the buildings and erections thereon; once the property of Hendrik MENTZ.
This Property and the foregoing, comprising Lots 5 and 8, cost the late Mr. van ROOYEN £1,150, i.e., £575 each.
The Terms of Credit will be made to suit purchasers and interest will be charge at 6 per cent only.
Title Deeds Diagrams, and Transfers may be seen at the office of the Auctioneer, from whom also any further particulars may be obtained.
M. E. SMIT, Auctioneer.

DIAMOND FIELDS.
The news brought by this week’s post is unusually interesting. Large finds, both in number and size, have been made at Hebron and Du Toit’s Pan. At the latter place diamonds have been unearthed weighing thirty two and a half, thirty-two, twenty, sixteen, fourteen, twelve carats and under. The reported finds amount in the aggregate to nearly two hundred carats in one week; and putting down the finds not mentioned at about the same, there is a total of nearly four hundred carats in one week! This is almost unprecedented; and proves that du Toit’s Pan is one of the richest, if not the richest, spots of the South African Diamond Fields. The lucky digger will soon have to leave the farm and try their fortunes elsewhere. Messrs. HOND and WEBB, the purchasers, have closed the farm to the public, and have given the present occupiers until the 15th May to work their claims out. A great indignation meeting of the diggers was held, and the feeling against the former proprietor ran so high as to endanger that gentleman’s safety. The resolution adopted of appointing a deputation to wait on Messrs. HOND and WEBB in order to make some arrangements for keeping the farm open, was soon nullified by Mr. HOND declaring that such a course would be perfectly useless. It is evidently the intention of the proprietors to work the farm for their own benefit.
The adjoining farm to du Toit’s Pan – WESSEL’s – has by this time been opened; but it is yet to be seen whether it will prove worth working. No diamonds, as far as we know, have yet been discovered on it, but its proximity to the now celebrated diggings of du Toit’s Pan, may lead to a fair trial being given to it. There will be a serious drawback on WESSEL’s Farm, viz, the scarcity of water. The supply at du Toit’s Pan is very limited; but we have been told that WESSEL’s farm has less water. A great deal could be done in a short time by making dams and sinking wells. By a little judicious expenditure most of the Free State farms, especially those on which diamonds have been found, could have an abundant supply of water. Wherever an attempt to construct wells has been made, and a sufficient depth obtained, water has invariably been found.
The postal arrangements at Pniel appear to be the reverse of satisfactory, according to the Diamond News. It says: “We were told that all the letters and papers sent from the Colony, and marked ‘Per Colonial post, via Hopetown, would arrive by that post at Klip Drift every Wednesday. Yet we – and we have no doubt others – frequently receive papers, distinctly marked as above, by the Bloemfontein post, three days later, for which advantage we have to pay, in addition, the extra Free State postage of six-pence per letter and one penny per paper. And we have not yet heard of one single instance in which letters dispatched from Klip Drift by the Thursday’s post have reached their destination in Grahamstown or Port Elizabeth at the advertised time. But we have heard of numberless instances in which they have arrived there from three days to a week later. For the first time since the contract commenced, the mail from below arrived here on Wednesday last at the appointed hour; and we are willing to take this as an earnest of better things for the future, as far as the contract is concerned. A little more care in making up the bags for the Fields, at the Colonial offices, will do away with a good deal of that which is now felt to be a great nuisance, and will reduce the number of complaints which are daily dinned into our ears.”

MISCELLANEOUS.

J. QUIN, Esq., M.L.A., left for Cape Town on Sunday. He went via the Diamond Fields.

PRISON-BREAKING. – Walter Nairne WHITE was brought before the resident Magistrate of Port Elizabeth on Tuesday morning, and sentenced to undergo one month’s solitary confinement.

BRIDGES. – The Telegraph says “The Sunday River and the principal rivers between Fort Beaufort and King William’s Town should be bridged at the earliest possible time and they will be if only the Eastern members are true to their constituents.” – [Several wagons conveying loads between King William’s Town and Grahamstown have passed through this place lately, evidently preferring this route to the shorter and most dangerous. – Ed.]

CIVIL SERVICE. – It is rumoured that Mr. CHALMERS, the Resident Magistrate and Civil Commissioner of Clanwilliam will get the promotion to the Magistracy of King William’s Town vacant by the promotion of Mr. GRIFFITH to Basutoland. Mr. CHALMERS’ intimate acquaintance with Frontier life and native character would render him admirably suited for this appointment. We also hear that Mr. HUDSON is likely to be appointed either to Swellendam or to Colesberg.

DIAMOND CUTTING. – Messrs. THOM and REID, who arrive from England by the R.M. St. Saxon, intend, in the course of a few months, commencing business as diamond cutters and polishers in Port Elizabeth. They will first visit the Diamond Fields to make themselves thoroughly acquainted with the nature of our South African gems and to form a connection, after which they will establish themselves in Port Elizabeth. Mr. THOM is a gentlemen of considerable experience. He is now a very old man, and nearly all his life has been spent amongst diamonds and precious stones. For twenty-five years he lived in Brazil, and during the whole of that time was connected with the mines in Brazil, occupying the position of diamond cutter and naturalist to the Emperor. Messrs. Thom and REID have brought with them a diamond cutting machine and other implements to carry on their business. We wish them success.

DIAMOND INTELLIGENCE.
(From the Diamond News.)
JUMPING AT ROBINSON’S. – Part of the farm known as ROBINSON’s which has hitherto been closed to the public, was jumped at Saturday last, by about 200 diggers from Hebron and other places. It appears that the whole farm belongs to a Mr. FOSTER, of whom Mr. ROBINSON rents a portion of the land’ and in his lease it stipulated that the other portion of the farm will remain closed to the public. The result of Saturday’s jumping has, however, been that the lease between the two gentlemen named has been cancelled, or modified, and the whole farm is thrown open to diggers.

ARRIVALS.
Mr. and Mrs. A. R. COACH and family;
Mr. Kidger TUCKER;
Messrs. PATTON, OATES, GRUZEBROOK, and many other, from England.

DEPARTURES.
Advocate BUCHANAN;
P. SCHOLTZ, Esq., M.L.C..;
J. S. WRIGHT, Esq., M.L.A. for Cape Town;
Dr. de MORGAN, for England;
Mr. Henry GILFILLAN, for Hopetown.

FINDS.

The following are the finds reported since out last issue: -

Pniel.

Dr. HALL,

 

2d;

 

*

 

46d

56c;

Spes Bona Company,

 

1d

1¾c,

Do

 

1d

1c,

Do

 

1d;

 

PADDY,

 

1d

3c,

Do

 

1d

1½c,

HONEY,

Gong-Gong,

1d

71½c,

MALLEY,

Do,

1d

4¼c,

MORRIS,

Cawood’s Hope,

1d

21c,

PILSINGTON & EASTON party

Hebron

1d

4⅗,

Do

 

1d

1¾c,

Do

 

1d

1½c,

Do

 

1d

0½c.

Du Toit’s Pan.

MOSS

1d

32½c

NEMO

2d

22c

ALLRIGHT

1d

16c

PLESSIS

1d

11¼c

DAVY

2d

12c

de VAAL

1d

10c

PRITCHARD

1d

7½c

POTTER

3d

12¾c

MASTERS

1d

14c

ROBERTS

1d

6¾c

van WYKE

1d

6½c

du TOIT

1d

5¾c

SHAW

2d

9¼c

HAZLAR

2d

11¼c

ROETZ

1d

7¼c

LOWE

2d

7c

Von SCHALK WICK

1d

9¼c

BIRT

1d

4¼c

KATZOO

1d

4c

AVERY

1d

1½c

ROUX

1d

7c

ANDERSON

6d

7c

PHILLIPS

1d

2c

NEMO

1d

20c

ADAMS

4d

5c

SWANEPOEL

3d

2¼c

VANDERLYE

1d

0½c

GELDENHEUSEN

2d

3½c

TROLLOPE

4d

5½c

REITZ Co

2d

1c

FINLAYSON CO

1d

2½c

SCHOLTZ

2d

2c

BUTLER

2d

1c

 HEBRON.

HENDRICKSON and MALAN

1d

10⅞c,

Do

1d

4¼c,

Do

1d

1⅞c,

A. RYAN

1d

5c,

DICKENSON

1d

1c,

S. POUTWELSER

1d

6c,

Do

1d

1c,

BOOYSTROM

1d

1½c,

Do

1d

5½c,

DANIEL and WICKS

1d

1¼c,

Do

1d

1½c

Do

1d

3c,

Do

1d

4c,

DELL and BOWLES

1d

2c,

Do

1d

1¼c,

Do

1d

0⅛c,

LAING

1d

5¼c,

Thos. BROWN

1d

3¼c,

MARAIS

1d

3⅛c,

RICKETS

1d

3½c,

T. JACKSON

1d

3½c,

Tiger-Slayer

1d

9⅛c,

MCFARLAND &Co

1d

6c,

Do

1d

0¼c,

SUTHERLAND and Co

1d

6c,

W. KOEIS

1d

7½c,

Do

1d

1c,

D. FOURIE

1d

2c,

DAVART

1d

3c,

S. P. LAROFFORD

1d

1½c,

Do

1d

0¼c,

S. COPE

1d

1½c,

LEEVIS

1d

1c,

HUNTING and HAWKINS

1d

4½c,

Carl NAUDE

1d

4c,

Do

1d

1c,

Jas DONAHOE

1d

4c,

Geo. THOM

1d

2¾c,

‘ADVOCATE’ TELEGRAMS.
Saturday, April 29.
Cape Town
STEAMER NORSEMAN last evening. Two cases of small-pox. Placed in quarantine.
Two seamen taken on board at Plymouth were attacked on the 5th with confluent small-pox. Both cases were bad, and on 11th one died, the other is barely convalescent.
Norseman expected to go on to Natal.
Passengers for Algoa Bay,
Mr. ADDISIN,
Mr. WORSELY,
Mr. SEGNE,
Mr. RENDER,
Mr. ROMEY,
Mr. CORBRIDGE,
Mr. BAYLEY.

POSTSCRIPT.

OFF TO THE FIELDS. – Messrs. LAWRIE and MUGGLETON’s party started during the week for the Diamond Fields.

VACCINATION. – An important notice appears in-day’s paper, from which it will be seen that the District Surgeon will attend at the Court House every Tuesday for the purpose of public vaccination.
TWO PARTIES of diamond diggers passed through Fort Beaufort last Saturday evening en route for the Fields – one party consisting of seven, the other of thirteen; the last party being Messrs. Thos. SYKES, T. BEARD, John and Thos. THORNBER, ROBINSON, W. and A. MCWILLIAMS, MARNBY, PAYTON, PREACHER, HORN, KINNIBURGH, and BARDNER.

GOLD. – Mr. DUNN, who is prospecting for gold on the part of the Colonial Government, has telegraphed to Mr. SOUTHEY from Swellendam, reporting that he has discovered specks of gold in the Kars River, fifteen miles from Bredasdorp, at Bredasdorp, Malagas, and Glenbarry. Mr. DAINTREE, the Australian geologist, who recommended Mr. DUNN for his present service, remarked before leaving, that on his way up from Bredasdorp he saw quartz which he believed to be gold-bearing.

BIRTH. – At Spring Vale, Winterberg on the 2nd May the wife of F. A. HATTON of a daughter.

BIRTH. – At Fort Beaufort on Sunday the 23rd inst., the wife of Mr. J. O’GARA of a son.

Saturday, May 13, 1871

MISCELLANEOUS.

MR. C. A. SMITH, M.L.A., started for Capetown this week to attend parliament.

THE REV. GEO. BROWN, M.L.A., started from here on Thursday morning to attend his Parliamentary duties.

VERY GRATIFYING. – On Thursday the Rev. J. O’CONNELL R.C.P. received a present from the Catholic community of Bedford, in the shape of a handsome well built buggy.

THE CRADOCK EXPRESS has ceased to exist. The editor says that, although the support accorded to it has been liberal there is hardly sufficient room for two papers to eke out a decent existence.

MR. RADEMEYER, who found a fifty-three carat diamond some time since, and obtained an advance on it of £3,000 from the Standard Bank, has, we believe, sold it for £8,000.

A HOTTENTOT who came here this week in search of stolen cattle, was robbed of his horse, saddle and bridle while on his return. He had off-saddled near Bedford in the evening, tied his horse to a tree near at hand, put his saddle at his head, and gone off to sleep. Waking up during the night he missed his saddle, and on looking for his horse found it gone too. The man turned back immediately, and when he got to FERGUSON’s he discovered another Hottentot on his horse, riding past. He immediately had him apprehended and brought into town. The thief, it appears, had seen the other man in town and knew where he was going.

A COOL TRICK. – By reference to an advertisement in another column it will be seen that “JACOB,” a man of colour, who speaks both the German and English languages, has gone astray with a covered gig, pair of horses, set of harness, and a couple of saddles, which had been entrusted to him to convey to his master (Mr. H. DRIVER, of Peddie), on the 21st March last. A liberal reward is offered for the arrest of the thief and the recovery of the cart and horses. It is supposed that Mr. JACOB is trekking towards the Diamond Fields. – K. W. T. Gazette.

DIAMONDS. – The diamonds found by Messrs. LLOYD and YOUNGs party having been sent home for sale they realised £45.The total weight was 11¾ carats, being under £4 a carat. All the stones were free from flaws with the exception of two small ones.

SALE OF LANDED PROPERTY BEDFORD. – We direct the attention of capitalists and others to the sale of those extensive premises at Bedford, in the estate of P. J. THERON, to be held by Mr. SMIT on Thursday the 18th inst. It is seldom a property so valuable is thrown into the market.

COMMUNICATION WITH THE DIAMOND FIELDS. – Mr. C. C. COLE, an enterprising American, who is expected out by the next mail steamer, is about to start a line of stage coaches to and from the Diamond Fields. Six of these vehicles, built by Messrs. ABBOT, DOWNING &Co., the well-known Connecticut builders, have already arrived in the Lyttelton, and are now landed. Each coach is strongly made, runs on springs, is handsomely fitted, seats 12 passe4ngers, and has necessary room for luggage and parcels. Mr. COLE has had considerable experience in this peculiar line of business, and was advised to take up the service between this town and Klipdrift by Mr. Isaac TAYLOR, of Boston, a gentleman long connected with the Cape trade. – Telegraph.

DIAMOND INTELLIGENCE.
(From the Diamond News.)
THE MOUNTED POLICE to the number of 500 are at Hope Town awaiting orders.

PNIEL MARKET. –
Beans 22s 6d per muid
Potatoes 33s per sack
Butter 11½d per lb.
Pumpkins 1s 2d each
Brandy 62s 6d per half-aum
Wines 60s do
Vinegar 30s 6d do
Hamels, poor, 5s each
Biltong 4½d per lb.

DURING THE WEEK there has been a great rush to WESSEL’s Farm, adjoining du Toit’s Pan, which was thrown open to the public on Monday last. Numerous carts and wagons left Pniel on that day, and the two or three days following, for this new digging. It is to be hoped that it will turn out as well as du Toit’s Pan has lately done.

DU TOIT’S PAN. – It is reported that Dorstfontein, otherwise Dutoitspan, will turn out a real diamond mine, and that the diamonds will probably, be found there to a depth of fifty or sixty feet. This place is about five hours’ ride from the Free State town of Boshof. An adjoining farm, known as Benaauwdheidsfontein, the property of Mr. J. WESSELS, has just been thrown open by the proprietor to the diggers. Dutoitspan is now, (as last week stated the property of the Hope Town Diamond Company, but it will apparently be no easy matter for the proprietors to get rid of the present diggers or to prevent “new chums” from joining them.

THE FOLLOWING FINDS ARE REPORTED SINCE OUR LAST ISSUE: -

Gong-Gong,

CHEERING

1d

8½c

 

HONEY

1d

1½c

 

STEYN

1d

4½c

 

LYALL

1d

1½c

Pniel,

JOLLIE and CLARK

1d

5c

 

Do

2d

 
 

Spes Bona Co.

1d

1¼c

 

Do

1d

1c

Lower Gong-Gong,

HONEY

1d

33c

 

Do

1d

2½c

 

BRADLY and Co.

1d

1c

 

Do

2d

1c

 

ARMITAGE

2d

3½c

Blue Jacket Rush,

JARDINE

1d

3⅓c

Cawood’s Hope,

STILES

1d

3c

 

MOSTERT

1d

23c

Spence’s,

Mr. TOBIN’s Party

1d

1¼c

 

Do

1d

2c

 

Do

1d

4c

Pniel,

J. HOLLAND

1d

4½c

Union Kopje,

SWAN

1d

3c

Du Toit’s Pan     

Mr. DRIVER

7d

4c

SNODDLES

1d

1¼c

TALBOT

1d

½c

Miss CROUQUET

1d

2⅗c

STAR

1d

3c

LOWE

1d

½c

ROGERS

1d

½c

BUTLER

2d

1½c

SWANEPOEL

1d

3c

SMITH

1d

7c

Do

1d

3½c

NEMO

1d

3c

JONAS

4d

2¼c

PLESSIS

2d

2½c

SHAW

2d

1⅞c

KERSTEIN

2d

2c

PRINCE

1d

3¼c

TAINTON

1d

1⅞c

KERTSENGER

2d

3½c

PLESSIS

1d

6½c

GRAFFORDI

2d

6c

ROTHMAN

1d

9c

GOUSE

1d

3¾c

TROLLOP

4d

3½c

WOEST

2d

8¼c

ALRIGHT

1d

8¾c

SOUNDY

2d

4c

KLEYNHANS

1d

4c

DELANGER

1d

20⅞c

DEGAGER

1d

4¼c

OPPERMAN

1d

3c

CHANGUOIN

1d

3c

VAYRAT

1d

3½c

KEYNANA

1d

4c

HENDERSON

2d

1½c

FOTHERINGHAM

1d

½c

HYDE

1d

1⅔

NEMO

1d

1c

HUMAN

 

93¼c

     

The following are the finds from the 17th to the 22nd April: -

Hebron.

HINTON

1d

3½c

ATTWELL

1d

9c

Do

1d

2c

DELL AND BOWLES

1d

1c

Do

1d

1c

Do

1d

1c

RYAN & SIMS

1d

3½c

YOUNG and Co.

1d

2½c

FORLONG Hope Co.

1d

1c

SEDDERSTDUM CO

1d

1c

JACKSON

1d

2¼c

Do

1d

½c

KEELER and Co.

1d

2c

J. MURRAY

1d

1¼c

GREEN

1d

1c

De KOCK

1d

7¼c

WINTER

1d

4c

Oriental Comp.

1d

1c

RICKETS

1d

2c

HARVEY

1d

1c

Do

1d

1c

ANDERSON

1d

1¼c

Do

1d

¼c

BAIN

1d

½c

LONGLAND

1d

4¼c

WRIGHT

1d

½c

BRIGGS

1d

1c

HEBRON MARKET PRICES:
Cape Brandy £7 per half-aum
Natal hams and bacon 9d per lb.
English do 1s 6d to 2s 3d do
Butter (salt) 1s do
Do (Fresh) 1s 6d do
Mealie meal 24s do
Bran 20s per muid
Peas 30s do
Boer soap 9d to 1s per lb.

Saturday, May 20, 1871

MISCELLANEOUS.

ATTEMPTED GAOL BREAKING. – Several of the hard labor prisoners, together with those who were put back for next Circuit, made an attempt to escape on Tuesday evening. Their efforts were frustrated by a patient in the hospital who, hearing the noise made by prisoners, gave information to the turnkey.

KRELI is taking steps to have the British Agent removed from his country.

ABOUT sixty recruits have recently joined the Mounted Police.

MR. MARK BAKER has been appointed to act as field-cornet of the ward No. 2, Blinkwater, in the division of Fort Beaufort, during the absence of Mr. Jno. RORKE.

A GENTLEMAN who arrived from Graham’s Town per passenger cart on Saturday, had the misfortune, on Wednesday evening, of being submitted to the tender mercies of the Deputy Sheriff. The cause of this we believe, is attributable to the fact that an hotel score in Port Elizabeth was lost sight of, and the landlord becoming uneasy, took the necessary steps for having the offending party apprehended before reaching his destination, the Diamond Fields. On Thursday morning the party in question was released, as the shilling was not paid.

RECEIVING MONEY UNDER FALSE PRETENCES. – a Storekeeper residing in this town made affidavit on Monday last against a general agent residing in Adelaide, on a charge of receiving money under false pretences. A warrant was immediately issued for the apprehension of said agent, and the chief constable sent off to put it in execution. On Tuesday the accused, Mr Stephanus POTGIETER, put in an appearance; and the investigation of the case was proceeded with the same day. From the evidence taken in court it appears that some time in March POTGIETER spoke to the storekeeper, Mr. KNIGHTLY, about buying produce for him, and represented that the only difficulty was the want of money. It was arranged that POTGIETER should draw upon KNIGHTLEY for £50, which was done, the draft being duly accepted. In a few days a draft of £100 at 90 days was drawn by POTGIETER on account of produce he had purchased but for which he could not procure wagon hire. A letter was sent in requesting more money to purchase two clips of wool. KNIGHTLEY declined making any more advances, as he had received no produce for the £150 already advanced. Seeing KNIGHTLEY a few days afterwards POTGIETER told him he was sorry he did not send the money, as it was Naachtmaal, and he could have purchased lots of produce. KNIGHTLEY went to Adelaide on the 12th May to see what produce there was on hand. Instead of the £100 worth which he expected, he could only get £24 worth altogether. He demanded his acceptances or the money from POTGIETER. The investigation closed on Tuesday evening, the case being remanded for further evidence. Bail was taken, the accused in £100, and two sureties £100 each, the accused to appear whenever called upon. As the case is likely to go further, we offer no comments either way on the subject.

MESSRS. GUSH AND SLATER, M.L.A.’s for Albany, have announced themselves in favour of Federation and the annexation to the colony of Basutoland and the Diamond Fields.

WE FREQUENTLY HEAR of the splendid luck of many of the diggers at the Diamond-fields. The ill-luck of others is not so often mentioned. A gentleman who returned to town last week told us of one instance. A farmer named GOUS from Prince Alfred, had been working a claim quite close to that of our informant, just before whose departure GOUS came up to him, and showing 1s 6d in his hand, said: - “That’s all I have left; and when I came here I had a wagon, a span of oxen, and £16 in money. I have worked steadily on for nine months, and have never been fortunate enough to turn up one gem.” Our informant assured as that this man had really worked most enrgetically throughout, though with this lamentable unsuccess. It was, however, the most unfortunate instance that he was aware of. – Herald.

COUNTERFEIT COIN. – One or two instances of the presence in our midst of counterfeit gold coin have come to our notice. In one case a native offered Mr. LEACH, of Poplar Grove, what appeared to be a half sovereign in payment of a blanket. Mr. LEACH’s attention had been drawn a day or two before to the fact of counterfeit coin being about, and as the coin appeared of a paler color than ordinary, he dropt it on his counter, when the leaden thud, instead of the clear of the genuine article, at once supported his suspicions. He then took hold of the coin and with the greatest ease bent it double. It appeared of Australian manufacture. The native, when questioned, stated that he had obtained it in town. It is a pity he was not detained, and the source of supply thus attempted to be ascertained. Some two or three days ago we saw three sovereigns in the possession of a gentleman in town, one of which was counterfeit, and yet all were to all appearance so perfectly alike that it was only by the sound the counterfeit one could be detected. We warn our friends and the public to be on their guard. – Representative.

DIAMOND INTELLIGENCE.
A FARM OVERSEER has been captured on the Diamond Fields, alleged to have decamped with 2,000 sheep and other live and dead stock from the Colony.

THE DIAMOND NEWS says the commando received orders to break up on Thursday last, and great joy was evinced by the burghers who were permitted to retire.

THE BLOEMHOF arbitration case drags its weary length along.

KLIP DRIFT POST OFFICE. – Between the 1st February and the 1st May 17,000 letters and 6,500 papers passed through this office.

A SEVENTY-SEVEN CARAT. – We hear from perfectly reliable authority that old Mr. Wentzel COESTER, of Tarka, near Cradock, has reached his home from Du Toit’s Pan, with a diamond of 77 carats, which was never reported whilst he was on the Field.

PROSPECTING ROUND PNIEL. – On Tuesday night last a number of storekeepers and others met in the committee tent, to consider the advisability of instituting a thorough prospection of the neighbourhood of Pniel, which it is felt has been comparatively neglected. The feeling of the meeting was strongly in favour of some action in the matter, and several gentlemen put down their names for £5 towards carrying the scheme through.

THE “Moonlight Rush” or “Sloane’s Rush,” as it has been indiscriminately called has been a matter of great interest since the beginning of this week. We told that vast numbers are trekking towards it, and that already 500 claims have been marked out. This “rush” is situated a long way down the river, being about fourteen miles below Gong-Gong, and two miles on this side of the junction of the Vaal and Harts Rivers. It is said to be the spot where JANTJE’s men have picked up so many surface diamonds: its locality, which has been studiously kept a secret by the natives, having lately, by strategy, been revealed. As described to us, it is a sort of second Cawood’s Hope, only upon the opposite side of the stream. Union Kopje and neighbouring rushes have, we hear, been nearly deserted for the “Moonlight.” We trust it will not have to be rechristened “Moonshine.”

FINDS.

The following are the finds reported since our last issue: -

Spes Bona Company,

Pniel,

1d

1¾c;

Do

Do

1d

1½c;

Do

Do

1d

1c;

Do

 

1d

 

TOWERT

Do

1d

2¼c;

Chas. JONES,

Do

1d

11⅛c;

England,

Do

3d

 

HEUGH,

Do

1d

4½c;

Do

Do

1d

2c;

Do

Do

2d

 

The Pangloflin,

Do

1d

 

J. HOLLAND,

Do

1d

4⅜c;

Good Hope Company,

Do

17d

 

Van der MERWE

De Beer’s

1d

70¾c;

Grahamstown Company,

Hebron

1d

5⅛c;

Do

Do

1d

1¾c.

DU TOIT’S PAN.

ERASMUS,

1d

12c;

JOHNSON,

1d

2¾c;

BEYIM,

1d

2c;

TROLLOPE,

1d

9c;

NELL (Grahamstown),

1d

14¼c;

Do,

1d

8c;

NEMO,

1d

12½c;

WOEST,

1d

3⅜c;

SPALDING,

1d

20¾c;

SEARLE,

1d

½c;

MULLER,

1d

½c;

Van de VENTER,

1d

3c;

SMITH,

1d

16c;

SNODDLES,

1d

¾c;

Eugene AUDEBERT,

1d

5½c;

Do,

1d

3c;

RODENEMEN,

1d

4c;

PHIL,

1d

2¼c;

WRIGHT,

1d

4c;

PRENIL,

1d

3½c;

NEMO,

1d

5c;

PRINSLOW,

1d

6¼c;

BUTLER,

1d

6c;

BAXTER,

1d

2¼c;

BEYERS & Co,

1d

9½c;

Do,

1d

3¼c;

Do,

1d

4c;

CONSTINE,

1d

2c;

Capt. FINLAYSON’s party,

1d

3c;

Do,

1d

1c.

 HEBRON.

The following are finds at Hebron for the week ending 29th April: -

STERLEY and Co,

1d

1¼c;

Do

1d

1c

W. CLAYTON,

1d

1¾c

G. W. REX,

1d

5½c

Do

1d

1¼c

Do

1d

1⅝c

Do

1d

1½c

Calvinia Company,

1d

1c

Phoenix Company,

1d

2⅝c

JABLE,

1d

1c

E. BUCKLEY,

1d

1c

A. BUCKLEY,

1d

1c

SIMS & RYAN

1d

2c

P. G. BLIGNAUT,

1d

1¾c

D. KOOF,

1d

5c

Van GRASSON,

1d

1¾c

J. MUTTER,

1d

1⅞c

BICCARD and AARRUAN Co,

1d

1c

TOWNSEND,

1d

ERASMUS,

1d

1c

WILKINSON and MARTIN,

1d

2½c

Oriental Co,

1d

2¼c

Do

1d

1½c

Josiah DANIAL,

1d

2¼c

Do

1d

3c

RICKETTS,

1d

4c

Do

1d

3c

Do

1d

¾c

F. MARAIS,

1d

3c

HINTON,

1d

1½c

MULLER,

1d

1½c

SMITH,

1d

5½c

CRAWLEY and Co,

1d

1¾c

Do

1d

1½c

Do

1d

2¼c

Do

1d

5½c

Do

1d

5¾c

Do

1d

6c.

CAWOOD’S HOPE.

Mr. SPALDING’S party,

1d

Mr. C. MOORE’s party,

2d

Mr. SOLOMON’s party,

1d

BOTHA’s party,

1d

GOOCH’s party,

1d

The weights of the above are not correctly known.

CONVICTS AT THE KATBERG.
Mr. LOXTON said he had a motion to propose relative to the convicts employed at the Katberg, and, as he had been informed by the hon. Colonial Secretary that the Government had no objection to give the information desired, he trusted the House would take it as an unopposed motion. What he wished to move he read as follows: - “That His Excellency the Governor be requested, by respectful address, to cause to be laid upon the table of this House, a return showing the cost of maintenance of the Katberg Pass for the years 1869 and 1870, and the revenues received at the tolls on the Queenstown and Stockenstrom sides of that mountain pass for the same period respectively.”
Mr. RORKE seconded, and the motion was agreed to.

POSTSCRIPT.

A PUBLIC MEETING, influentially called, was held in BLAINE’s store, Grahamstown, on Tuesday last, to consider what course should be adopted in reference to Mr. MOLTENO’s motion.

LARGE NUMBERS of Fingoes, it is said, are leaving Port Elizabeth in dread of the small-pox.

JUMPING. – A Dutchman named HATTINGH, lately from the Diamond Fields, has been apprehended on a charge of stealing a span of oxen in the neighbourhood of Penhoek. He had got as far as this place, and offered the oxen to a butcher for £5 each. The price being considered too high, a reduction of £1 on each ox was readily made by the seller. The apparent anxiety to get rid of the cattle at any price, aroused the suspicions of a person who was present, and he immediately laid information that he thought the oxen were not come by honestly. Not being able to do business with the first butcher, Mr. HATTINGH went to another dealer in cattle and sold ten of the span for £36. For which amount he received a cheque on the local bank. While on the way to the bank to have the cheque cashed, he was apprehended and lodged in gaol. A confession has been since made, and another Dutchman, aged about 80 years, has been implicated.

DIAMONDS. – A large number of diamonds were submitted to public auction at Port Elizabeth this week. There was spirited competition for some of the lots, and it will be seen by the list given below that a fair proportion of them found buyers: -

 

32 diamonds

32½ carats

£30

 

27 do

31⅛ do

£68

 

31 do

33½ do

£86

 

1 do

2¼ do

£42

Not sold. -

6 do

13¼ do

£78

 

23 do

27⅝ do

£128

 

18 do

24½ do

£112

 

10 do

19⅛ do

£45

 

1 do

19¼ do

£180

 

6 do

16 do

£27.

RELEASE OF EMETT. – By Monday’s post the Resident Magistrate received from Cape Town a letter, notifying a remission of the sentence passed upon EMETT. Mr. HUNTLY went to the prison without delay and communicated his Excellency’s clemency to the prisoner. EMETT expressed his gratitude in suitable terms, and left the prison in the course of the morning. – Eastern Star.

OUR REPRESENTATION. – We beg to acknowledge the receipt of a communication from Mr. W. AYLIFF, of WARDENS, division of Fort Beaufort, in which that gentleman intimates that if a local candidate is not forthcoming, he would place his services at the disposal of the Queenstown electors. From other communications received we have ascertained that Mr. AYLIFF will not contest the seat of Mr. WARNER, but would do so if it were a question of the election of Mr. SPRIGG or any other non-resident. Mr. WARNER has agreed to stand if elected without a contest. We are in a position to state that should a poll be demanded the supporters of Mr. WARNER will not shirk the responsibility of a contest, but will use their utmost endeavours to secure his return. We believe that this has been communicated to Mr. AYLIFF as also to Mr. SPRIGG. – Free Press.

“Advocate’ Telegram
Monday, 15th May, 1871.
Northam arrived on Saturday night.
Case of small pox on board placed in quarantine.
The Captain refused to give up the mails at first, on order from the Governor did so, but would not allow any newspaper parcels to be landed.
Passengers for Algoa Bay, Revd. Mr. PICKERING, Mrs. PICKERING and two children,
Mr. MEADOWS,
Mr. DREW,
Mr. ROODIFIELD,
Mr. JOHNSON, Mrs. JOHNSON and infant.

Saturday, May 27, 1871

MISCELLANEOUS.

A NUMBER OF PEOPLE started on Wednesday to spend the day picnicking at Cathcart Vale. In the evening there was a dance in Mr. AUSTEN’s roomy hotel.

BLINKWATER. – The sports advertised to come off at this place on the Queen’s Birthday, proved very attractive. Ladies and Gentlemen on horseback, in carts, spiders, &c., went out. The junior portion of the community also mustered in force, and those who could not raise horses, walked out. We believe everything passed of successfully.

DR. BREDA was conveyed to Graham’s Town this week, in charge of the Chief Constable. We believe that he will be tried there.

THE QUEEN’s BIRTHDAY. – In former times when the military were stationed here, there was no lack of sports on the Queen’s Birthday. The celebration of the natal day this year, however, had the likelihood of being a dull affair; and so it proved, at least during the day. In the evening the apparent want of loyalty on the part of the inhabitants, was fully atoned for by a grand display of fireworks in the square. The small boys flocked from all parts of the town, and indulged themselves to their hearts’ content in firing off squibs, crackers, rockets, mines, jacks in the box, &c. Two balloons, measuring ten feet in circumference, were set off in the early part of the evening. They went up slowly until a certain height was reached, when they were wafted away by the breeze. The amusements closed by a bonfire in the square.

WE ARE informed that transport from Port Elizabeth to the Diamond Fields is very scarce.

A CASE OF SOME INTEREST to diamond seekers was tried at Hope Town recently. A boy in the employ of Mr. KOOPMAN, of Remhoogte, a farm on the Orange River, picked up a large diamond, not knowing what it was. He showed it to a man employed on the same farm, who afterwards stole it from the finder, and sold it to a trader. When this came to the knowledge of the proprietor of Remhoogte, he made an attempt to get back what he justly regarded as his property, and proceedings were instituted against the trader. The latter managed to escape the meshes of the law, but the thief was convicted on his own confession. The diamond weighed over fifty carats, and has been valued at about £5,000. This is the second case of diamond theft which has been investigated at Hope Town, - the first being that of a Kafir who is supposed to have swallowed the diamond.

GOSSIP FROM THE DIAMOND FIELDS. – The special correspondent of the Standard, writing from Klipdrift, remarks: “It is no rare thing to see merchants’ stores crowded with Boers, their wives and families, and as a rule, a Boer’s family at this end of the world is an exceedingly respectable one as well in point of numbers as in good looks and manners. The average runoff families in point of numbers in this fertile and salubrious region is from eight to ten, and it is not an uncommon thing to find sixteen strapping sons and daughters following their ‘pa’ and ‘ma.’ I saw last week a fine old gentlemen and lady who have in the way of increasing and multiplying their species added eighteen to the human race. They were quite incapable of counting the number of their grand-children, and laughed at the idea when they were asked to do so. The family wagon is as remarkable as the family. The wagon answers all the purposes of a house. It has its sitting-rooms and sleeping-rooms, and is fitted up with every requisite for family use; for cooking and for eating, and the best life in Africa is undoubtedly the Boer wagon life on this side of the Vaal. It is positively luxurious. If the wagon in the inside is fitted up with every requisite, and contains ten times more furniture than any outsider would believe could be crowded in, the outside is more wonderful still. On every panel there is a picture of African life. On a wagon within ten yards of me there are panels with hunting scenes – the buffalo brought down; herd of elephants at full gallop; crocodile biting a man into pieces; elephant trumpeting; portraits of Betlapin Kafirs and Baralong women, almost in a state of nature, with native warriors to match. The painting are no bad specimens of art, but where artists are found who can paint so excellently is more than I can tell.”

A CASE of great importance came before the Supreme Court yesterday. The plaintiff alleges that he was engaged as a special constable at Calvinia to assist in bringing prisoners to Cape Town, and that on his arrival here he was thrown into gaol by Mr. J. B. CURREY, then acting as resident magistrate of this city. He states that he was never charged with a crime, nor was he a witness in any criminal case. On the other side, it is alleged that he was a witness in a criminal case, and that because he was such witness he was imprisoned. The man petitioned some time ago to be allowed to sue Mr. CURREY in forma pauperis, and the matter was referred to Mr. de VILLIERS, who certified that there was reasonable ground for the action. A rule nisi was subsequently granted, and yesterday was the date set down for Mr. CURREY to show cause why the rule should not be made absolute. The Attorney-General appeared for Mr. CURREY and in the course of the argument, these two questions were raised: - 1st. Is a poor man to be placed by the charity of the Court in a similar position to avail himself of the technicalities of the law as any man who can afford to pay costs? 2nd. Is a counsel to whom a petition is referred to confine himself to the evidence handed to him with the petition in order to form an opinion as to a reasonable cause for action, or is he to seek information on the case wheresoever and howsoever he may get it, having no power to take evidence on oath or to compel the attendance of witnesses? To enable the Attorney-General to look up authorities supporting the affirmative to these two questions, the Court adjourned the further hearing of the case till Friday next. - Argus.

DIAMOND FIELD.
(From Diamond News.)
DU TOIT’S PAN. – From this place a correspondent writes us, under date May 10th: “This morning, before breakfast, a 53 carat and 47 carat were found! A young lady sorting near us got an 8¼ afterwards; and I know of a 6, 15, and 16 carat to-day besides.

LARGE SNAKE. – The other night as Mr. SPALDING and some others were returning to Cape Hope from the New Rush, they encountered a large snake of a boa species, which they killed with stones. The reptile measured ten feet in length, and about sixteen inches in circumference.

THE LADIES. – According to all accounts the fair sex must be more numerously represented at du Toit’s Pan than at any other Camp. We hear that no less than fifty ladies appeared at church there last Sunday, many of them dressed in the height of fashion.

ONE DAY’S FINDS AT DU TOIT”S PAN. – From a private letter to a gentleman at Pniel from his relative at du Toit’s Pan, we make the following extract” “Yesterday, May 8th, were found the following diamonds, which I have seen, viz, one each 70, 22, 20, 15½, 15, 10, 4, 2½, and 1¼ carats.” Not bad this for a single day.

THE INLAND TRANSPORT WAGON left early on Wednesday morning last for Cape Town, taking Messrs. J. QUIN, M.L.A., ROSS, BUCK, DONALD, GRIGGS, and CHAPMAN.

MR. BEBELL, the gentleman who some time ago purchased the concession of the diamondiferous country from JANTJE for the sum of £750, has just arrived upon the Fields. Mr. BEBELL has his concession and his proclamation in his pocket, and awaits but the decision of the Bloemhof Court – should it be in favour of the Batlapin Chief – to publish the latter and to claim his rights.

SEVENTY-NINE CARATS! – Mrs. van der VREEDE was standing by her husband’s claim at du Toit’s Pan, on Tuesday last, when she observed something glittering in one side, and told the native to pick it out. He did so, and it turned out to be magnificent straw-colored gem of seventy-nine carats. Perfect in shape, and without blemish. The old lady was so pestered with visitors to see the diamond, that she at last uttered a hearty – and apparently heartfelt – wish that she had never found it.

THE MOONLIGHT RUSH. – From a gentleman who had just paid a special visit to the Moonlight we hear the following authentic particulars: The Camp is a remarkable scene of activity. Pniel, in its palmist days, says our informant, was nothing to it. A great number of people are collected on the spot, and the mass of tents is something astonishing. You cannot throw a stone in any directions without hitting a canteen or a shop. As regards the finds, the richness of the Camp appears to have been somewhat exaggerated. Mr. STRONG’s 39 carat, and two fifteens, appear to be the largest yet discovered. Our informant himself has four parties working there, and neither had yet found anything. The wash is much the same as at Cawood’s Hope, - the claims being, if anything, shallower.

FINDS.

WALLER,

Pniel,

1d

2c;

C. JONES,

Do,

1d

2½c;

CLARKE & COLE,

Do,

1d

8¾c;

Do,

Do,

1d

3¾c;

Spes Bona Co,

Do,

1d

2c;

Good Hope Co,

 

1d

2c;

Do

 

4d

 

*

De Beers,

9d

16c;

J. STRONG,

Moonlight

1d

89c

*

Do

1d

15c;

*

Do

1d

15c.

DU TOIT’s PAN. -

Van VREDE,

1d

79c

BRETTS

1d

53½c

SWANEPOEL

1d

35¼c

Do

1d

5c

STRIT

1d

23¾c

GROBLER

1d

15½c

ZEX

1d

15½c

NEMO

1d

15c

DAVID

1d

2⅛c

ARUS

1d

8½c

Carl GOOSTE

1d

8½c

EYBUS

1d

2⅛c

JESSOP

1d

6¾c

CARSON

1d

6c

DUVENAGE

1d

6c

CROFT

1d

5⅜c

DO

1d

1¾c

VAN WYKE

1d

5½c

MCKAY

1d

5c

DOCTOR

1d

5c

NENTO

1d

4¼c

DO

1d

3c

BURTON

1d

5½c

COSGROVE

2d

10c

J. T.

1d

3¼c

NELL (of G. Town)

1d

8½c

DO

1d

2c

BRANDT

1d

2½c

SCHULTZ

4d

5c

MILLAR

1d

3c

HOLLIDAY

3d

3c

TUINTON

1d

3c

HINS

1d

4c

Do

1d

2½c

WOEST

2d

3½c

VAN GRAAN

1d

2c

Golden Lace

1d

2c

Do

1d

1c

LOWLER

1d

3c

DO

1d

1c

La GRANDE

1d

3c

LIVER

1d

5¼c

DO

1d

1½c

SHORT

1d

1c

NEMO

1d

⅛c

VENTER

1d

1¾c

NEMO

2d

2¼c

HOOLE

3d

2c

GREGOR

1d

1¼c

PRINCE

1d

1½c

WILSEN

2d

3c

Du PLESSIS

1d

1c

SWANEPOEL

1d

½c

KRUGER

2d

2¼c

Von GRANS

3d

4c

FINLASON Co

1d

1c

ROTHSCHILD

1d

¼c.

 VOSTER’S RUSH. –

SIMPSON & Co.

1d

12c

Jas. GLEESON

1d

82½c

GOODHATER

1d

2c

Thomas MULLER

1d

6¼c

Do

1d

6¾c.

 SPENCES. –

T. SWEETNAM

1d

11⅛c

Do

1d

4¼c

Do

1d

1½c

JASON

1d

5¾c

Do

1d

6c

BISSET

1d

15¾c

Do

1d

15⅛c

TROLLIP

1d

13¼c

Do

1d

2½c

Do

1d

1¾c

HEBRON. –

*

1d

42¼c

Do

1d

3⅛c

LOTHERINS Co

1d

10½c

HOLLIDAY

1d

2½c

*

1d

66c

Do

1d

15c

DONAHOE

1d

1¾c

Do

1d

3c

Do

1d

1c

HINTON &Co

1d

3½c

Do

1d

8½c

Do

1d

2¼c

DALY

1d

5½c

KINGSLEY & COWEL

1d

6⅞c

DERRY

1d

5½c

Do

1d

3½c

Do

1d

1c

John LEWIS

1d

6c

DONAHOE

1d

10c

COLLINS

1d

5½c

Do

1d

3c

RICKETS

1d

1½c

Do

1d

1¾c

DAVIES and DICKINSON

1d

1½c

Do

1d

2c

HALSE

1d

1½c

Do

1d

1¾c

Alfred BUCKLEY

1d

1¼c

Do

1d

1⅛c

E. SOLOMON

1d

3⅞c

Piet KAFIR

1d

3⅜c

H. MURPHY

1d

2c

G. NIEKERK

1d

1½c

MARGRAFF

1d

2½c

A. W. le ROY

1d

2c

Van GRASSOUW

1d

1½c

E. HAMILTON

1d

8¼c

E. SOLOMON

1d

1⅜c

Do

1d

1c

CARRIE & Co

1d

1c

DELL & BOWLES

1d

1½c

Do

1d

1¾c

MUIR

1d

1c

BOOGSTROOM

1d

1⅜c

CONSTANTIN

1d

12c

Do

1d

5c

Do

1d

1c

Calvinia Co

1d

1⅜c

G. VENTER

1d

2½c

Mrs. ATWELL

1d

1½c

Do

1d

5c

J. VENTER

1d

2½c

J. EVERY

1d

2c

BLACKBEARD

1d

3c

CROUCH Co

1d

2½c

Do

1d

1¼c.

Those marked with star decline having name mentioned.

INSOLVENT COURT, FORT BEAUFORT.
Saturday, May 29, 1871.
(Before D. ASHBURNHAM, Esq., J. P.)
Re Robert BOVEY (deceased).
The following claims were filed at the second meeting: -

C. MALLETT,

Open account

£

7

4

8

W. MUGGLETON,

Do

 

32

4

0

SHAW & Co.

Do

 

45

10

11

L. H. MEURANT,

Do

 

79

6

1

Ins. Co.,

Bond & interest

 

200

0

0

T. WARD,

Open account

 

23

11

3

Est. ESTMENT,

do

 

60

16

8

C. HOLLIDAY,

Do

 

58

10

8

RICHARDS & Co

   

7

13

0

Mr. T. WARD proposed, and Mr. T. QUIN seconded. – That Mr. John QUIN be elected Sole Trustee.
Mr. W. MCGILLEWIE proposed on behalf of Mr. W. MUGGLETON, and seconded on behalf of Messrs. SHAW & Co., - That Mr. B. B. ATTWELL be Sole Trustee.
The matter being put to the vote, it was found that the claims entitled to vote were equally divided. The amount was then considered, - the creditors in favour of Mr. J. QUIN representing £399 11s 2d; and those in favour of Mr. ATTWELL, £164 5s.
The Acting Magistrate refused to decide in favour of either of the parties proposed, but postponed the meeting until next Saturday (to-day).

RE. WILLIAM HARVEY.
Claim filed at second meeting. –
Fort Beaufort & V Bank, bond…£300.
Mr. J. QUIN was elected Sole Trustee.

‘ADVOCATE’ TELEGRAMS.
Tuesday, May 23.
Cape Town.
INTELLIGENCE received of the supposed wreck of a French vessel off Struyspoint. The bodies of three white and forty-three colored men, and eleven women washed up. In a tin box attached to one of the bodies was a coolie’s certificate, with the name “Convenance TWEDHINSTREDTONS, of Nantes.” Nothing seen of the wreck. It is supposed to have foundered.

A YOUNG LADY named HOLLAND committed suicide by throwing herself from a rock into the sea at Seapoint on Saturday evening. The body has not yet been found.

POSTSCRIPT.

MR. SPARKS’ diamond, found by his party, has realised £1250 at home. He is well pleased with the bargain.

JUNCTION HOTEL. – Mr. H. CALLAGHAN, the purchaser of this Hotel, has disposed of it to Mr. BAILEY, of Port Elizabeth, for £1800.

“DIAMOND FIELD.” – We have to acknowledge the receipt of the third number of this paper. From the number of advertisements we imagine that the undertaking will prove remunerative. It has our best wishes for its success.

SALE OF LANDED PROPERTY AT BEDFORD. – The landed property in the estate of P. J. THERON, was sold by Mr. SMIT at Bedford on the 25th inst., subject to the approval of the Master of the Supreme Court, as follows:
The main building, formerly used as hotel premises, to Mr. COOPER, of the firm of COOPER and DRUMMOND, Somerset East, for £500;
One of the cottages to Mr. C. W. HUTTON for £156;
And the other to Mr. DELANCY for £123 – the whole of the premises thus realizing £779. There is a mortgage of £800 upon the property in favor of the Orphan Chamber, and interest at 6 per cent, is owing for one year. Whilst the amount realized is small compared with the value of the buildings, the trustees in THERON’s estate are satisfied that they cannot do better than close the sale, and the Master will, no doubt, gladly concur therein. The three vacant erven, known as STEBBING’s block, were sold unconditionally to John MCDONAGH for £23.

£3000 FOR HOGGS BACK. – At the last monthly meeting of the Victoria East Divisional Council it was resolved to petition the Parliament for a grant of £3000 towards the construction of a road up the Hogg’s Back via GAIKA’s Kop. The Alice people are evidently alive to the importance of opening up this line of road, but after the experience of the Katberg we fear the Parliament is not likely to vote away money for a mountain pass which can be avoided by a slight detour. There can be no harm, however, in petitioning the Parliament, as it may lead to a profitable discussion.

MONEY IN A DOG’S BELLY. – A rather singular incident occurred the other day Chichabo. A Kafir having obtained a little money, wrapped it up in a rag (a greasy one we presume) and placed it carefully away in his hut for security. Some time afterwards on going into his hut to look for the money, he found it had vanished, and as only a child and a dog were present when he put it away, he was at a loss to know what had become of it; he felt quite sure the child would not take it, and perhaps could hardly suspect the dog; the child on being asked denied having touched it, and all other enquiries failing to lead to its discovery, the owner began at length to suspect the dog, and told his neighbours that the dog had eaten his money, but got laughed at for his pains. However, he was determined to ascertain the fact, and next morning seized the poor animal, he mercilessly cut its throat and then disembowled it, when to the astonishment of the bystanders and to his intense gratification, out came the rag with its valuable contents. The circumstance is said to have created a great deal of merriment among the inhabitants of the station. Watchers.

FAST TRAVELING. – An Eastern member has arrived at Cape Town from an Eastern Town and has come via the diamond fields. Rather a long route certainly, and yet the distance has been accomplished in a wonderfully short space of time. The travelling has been so fast as to speak highly of the means of transport and the constitution of the traveller. On the 30th of April, Mr. J. QUIN, M.L.A., left Fort Beaufort, and since that date has travelled over something like 1,400 miles of country – an average of about 80 miles a day. In the eighteen days he has seen the principal camps at the fields, and tells us the sight fully compensates for all the travelling. The finds are something wonderful just now, especially at Du Toit’s Pan. But he does not believe that the finds are more numerous than they were before. But that the diggers are publishing their finds so as to attract others, as they wish to keep digging fraternity strong enough to defy the owners of the farm. Mr. QUIN left the fields on the 10th instant in one of the Transport Company’s wagons, and arrived here on Wednesday, thus completing the journey from the Vaal in eight days. This necessitated a good deal of night travelling, and for the first four or five days none of the company had a night’s rest. The comfort of the wagon is lightly spoken of, but the night travelling, constantly night after night is rather too much of a good thing. The provisioning, up to Beaufort West, is not well spoken of, and at the hotel at Victoria West neither beer nor French brandy could be obtained. But the rate of travelling is confessed to be wonderful; and after all, this is the object the Company has in view, compatible, as far as possible with the convenience of the passengers. These road-side inns should be looked up though; and at Hope Town the contractor does not seem to be very alert. Occasionally bullock have to be spanned in. The day before his departure, Mr. QUIN heard that an old woman at du Toit’s Pan had picked up a 96 carat diamond. – Standard & Mail.

Saturday, June 3, 1871

GOVERNMENT GAZETTE.
PUBLIC VACCINATION.
The attention of the inhabitants of the Town and District of Fort Beaufort is requested to the fact that Small-pox prevails extensively as an epidemic throughout Europe, and that steps have been taken by the Government to prevent, as far as possible, its introduction into this Colony.
Notice is hereby given that until further notice, the District Surgeon will attend at the Court House, Fort Beaufort, every Tuesday, at 12 o’clock, for the purpose of Public Vaccination, free of charge.
Re-vaccination on the part of those previously vaccinated, is considered to be highly desirable.
The attention of Missionaries and others in charge of Native Institutions or Locations, is earnestly requested to the imperative necessity for sedutoresly seconding the precautionary measures taken by the Government to guard against the dissemination of this disease, public vaccination not having taken place in this district for many years. This notice refers to adults as well as children.
L. H. MEURANT,
Civil Commissioner,
Civil Commissioner’s office,
Fort Beaufort, May 5, 1871.

POSTAL NOTICE.
It is hereby notified for general information that His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to appoint Mrs. Maria Elizabeth BROWNING to be Postmistress of Fort Beaufort, from the 1st instant.
Arthur TWEED,
For Postmaster-General,
General Post Officer, Cape Town,
22nd April, 1871.

NOTICE.
Union Fire & Marine Insurance and Trust Company of Graham’s Town.
The undersigned having been appointed the local Agent of the above Company, is prepared to receive proposals of Assurance for transmission to the Office in Grahamstown, and to attend to any other business connected with the Company’s interests.
Forms of Proposal. &c., may be had on application at my store.
J. RICHARDS, Agent.
N.B. – A Bonus of 5 per cent, on the Annual Premium will be allowed to all persons effecting Policies of Assurance with the above Office.

DU TOIT’S PAN.
The 13th of May, the day on which the owners of this farm stated that it should be closed to the public, has come and gone, and the question settled satisfactorily to both diggers and owners. At two o’clock on the day appointed a large meeting was held. People from the various camps had assembled to hear and see what would be the end of this affair, and whether the owners would attempt to drive the diggers off. Mr. LILIENFIELDT addresses the meeting, and explained to the diggers the difficulties of his position. He said that in consequence of the large population now existing on the farms, the owner had come to the conclusion that it was better to leave the holders of old licences granted by the late owner, in possession of their claims, free of charge; and to levy a licence of 10s 6d a month on all new claims. The announcement was received with applause, not because the diggers feared being turned off, but because the proprietors have had sense enough to see that any attempt to drive the present occupants away would be futile. They were compelled by force of circumstances to submit, and they did so with a good grace. Leaving the farm open to the public was only part of the determination arrived at; the proprietors have informed the diggers of their intention to go to considerable expense in constructing well on the farm, so as to have a sufficient supply of water for all. This act will be duly appreciated. None but those who have lived on Free State farms, where wood and water are scarce, can imagine the privations that have to be endured, especially in winter. It is fortunate that at the present time when the proprietors have such good intentions, that Mr. BABE is at Du Toit’s Pan for the purpose of considering the possibility of leading water through the diamond farms from either the Vaal or Modder rivers. As soon as surveys have been completed, a prospectus will be issued. There is no doubt of the undertaking proving a success as far as pecuniary aid is concerned. All see the great necessity existing for a sufficient supply of water, and we fancy there will be little difficulty in raising the requisite sum to carry out the work. The undertaking, although likely to prove very beneficial, is not of great magnitude. No engineering difficulties will be in the way. The country from the Modder to the Vaal Rivers is generally level.
The magnanimity of Mr. LILIENFIELDT was still further evinced by his proposition to leave all details of management of the camp to a committee to be elected by the diggers.

MISCELLANEOUS.

MR. GEO. WIGGILL, of Bram Bosch Spruit, Winterberg, died at the residence of his brother, near Queenstown, on the 29th ult.

THE F.A.M. Police are returning from their trip northwards. Only GILFILLAN’s troop will remain. A company under Sub-Inspector BOYES arrived at Queenstown on Tuesday evening.

THE SALE held by Mr. SMIT at the Upper Blinkwater, in the estate of R. C. van ROOYEN, was one of the most successful held in the district for some years past.
The day was beautifully fine, and the attendance that could be desired. The districts of Fort Beaufort, Victoria East and Queenstown were well represented, and even Lower Albany put in an appearance. It is needless to say that Stockenstrom farmers mustered in great force. We though a fine day and a good attendance augured well for an important sale, and we were not mistaken. The stock and other moveables sold rapidly at excellent prices. The 3,000 ewes and wethers were sold at prices varying from 3s to 7s 3d each, averaging more than 5s each all round. Cattle fetched from £3 10s to £7 17s 6d each. One young stallion brought £24, and the sundries realized full value.

DIAMONDS. – On Saturday morning Mr. J. D. INGRAM exhibited in King William’s Town 23 pretty little gems, the finds of his party at the Fields, who had found 35 in all, 12 having been sent home. The largest gem shown was 4½ carats.

DROOGEFONTEIN, RICHMOND DISTRICT. – We are informed that this fine farm, in extent about 6,000 morgen, has just been sold by Mr. V. C. VERMEULEN to the Messrs. KOEK for £3,000. – G. R. Herald.

HER MAJESTY’S BIRTHDAY. – The stores in town were closed all day, and the weather being tolerably favourable, pic-nic parties in kloofs and favourite places of resort, were numerous. Mr. CAWOOD’s swivel guns fired a Royal salute at noon, which was heard in every part of the city. – Journal.

DEPARTURES. – Mr. KENNELLY, M.L.C. and Mr. BROWN, M.L.A., left town this morning en route for Capetown. Mr. S. CAWOOD leaves on Tuesday next, and is likely to be accompanied by Mr. HOOLE, M.L.C. – Ibid.

CIVIL SERVICE APPOINTMENTS. – It seems that Mr. van der RIET of Colesberg has been appointed Civil Commissioner and Resident Magistrate of Graaff-Reinet. Mr. WRIGHT, of Middelburg, has been directed to go to Colesberg to let MR. van RIET come here. – G. R. Advertiser.

VACCINATION. – Nearly the whole of the Natives on the Location have now been vaccinated, chiefly by Dr. ATHERSTONE. In respect of the European population, Dr. ATHERSTONE, and other medical practitioners in town have had their attention fully occupied. – Journal.
TARRY’S MULE WAGONS. – The proprietors of these conveyances have determined to open up a line between Pniel and the coast via Queenstown and Fort Beaufort, the fare to be £7 10s right through to Port Elizabeth. This will be the cheapest conveyance in the Colony. The first wagon was to leave Pniel at the end of last month.

DESERTION. – His Excellency the Governor directs it to be notified for general information that he has received a despatch from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State, intimating that Her Majesty will not be advised to exercise her power of disallowance with respect to the Act No. 1 of 1870, passed by the Legislature of this colony, and entitled “An Act to regulate the apprehension within this colony of deserters from Her Majesty’s Land Forces,” and that the said Act will be left to its operation.

TOWN AT DU TOIT’S PAN. – We hear that a town has been laid out at Du Toit’s Pan, and that the allotments are being purchased and rapidly built upon. This place is said to the centre of an extensive diamondiferous country. The diggers have now penetrated through the loose soil where diamonds were casually found, and come upon the matrix where the diamond is formed.

A SAD END.
One of those melancholy and mysterious tragedies took place on Saturday night at Sea Point which teach is what unsounded depths of sorrow may be veiled by an habitually cheerful bearing, and what undercurrents of stern resolution may be hidden by the play of a free and strong nature. A young lady, not yet twenty years of age, in the flower of a youth graced with many charms of manner and appearance, throw herself off the rocks at Sea Point into one of the angriest seas that ever beat upon the shore.

At six o’clock on Saturday night a black hat and a black mantle, neatly trimmed were brought into Mr. HOSKINGS’s shop, together with a black silk parasol and a pair of black silk gloves, carefully folded. They had been picked up on the high broad rocks that stand out like the breastwork of a fortification opposite Captain DIVERS’, and a melancholy story came with them. Their unfortunate owner had been seen by Captain DIVERS’ servant and others to walk rapidly backwards and forwards on the beach road, and occasionally to make her way to the edge of the rocks which skirt the shore. Whether her determination wavered, or she was appalled at the tremendous breakers, or could not find a convenient spot for the purpose on which she was beat, can, of course, only be conjectured; but upwards of an hours appeared to have been spent in these irregular movements, which, however, excited no suspicion in the minds of those who watched her. At length the unfortunate lady climbed the rocks before named, and after walking backwards and forwards for a few moments, deliberately took off her mantle and gloves, folded them quietly up, and, holding one hand over her eyes, leaped into the boiling flood below. The servant who had been watching her more from curiosity than from suspicion of anything wrong, rushed to the spot immediately. Some distance from the shore she saw, or thinks she saw, a hand in the thick masses of seaweed which sway to and fro with the surge, but it vanished instantly. Others, attracted by the cries of Captain Drivers’ servant, who involuntarily exclaimed as she witnessed the fatal leap, came to the spot, and searched diligently for some time, but in vain. The search was renewed on Sunday morning by the heart-broken friends of the lady, but to no purpose, - the waves were, if possible, bigger than the day before, and the surf tremendous. The sea had borne away its victim, and refused to return it to the anxious searchers.
The name of the lady was soon discovered at Sea Point. She appeared to have left town by the half-past four train, and to have conversed with perfect cheerfulness and calmness, and without showing any excitement of manner, with a Sea Point lady, who, on hearing what had transpired, instantly recognized the things which had been left. Her friends were speedily communicated with, and, we need hardly say, heard with overwhelming grief of the calamity which had unexpectedly overtaken them.
It cannot be any secret, and it is best publicly to state, that the unhappy girl was the niece of Mr. Wm. STIGANT, and had resided with him for years in most affectionate association with the members of his family, always showing warm attachment to the children, to whom she was like a second mother. We have heard from those intimate with Miss HOLLAND that nothing could exceed the heartiness with which she spoke of her complete happiness in her adopted home, and of the generous care with which she had been trained and educated. If we allude to the trouble which appeared to prey upon her mind, it is only in the hope that the reckless and thoughtless manner in which young girls are sometimes treated may be associated in the public mind with the calamity of Saturday night. It appears that a month or two ago Miss HOLLAND received a wicked and cruel Valentine, reflecting in a disgusting and brutal manner upon some of her relations (not, we may say, upon any member of Mr. STIGANT’s family), and upbraiding her on their account. In a way that need not be mentioned, these brutal reflections were connected with some heart-troubles of her own, and were consequently bitterly felt by her. High-spirited, and with a good deal of natural pride, Miss HOLLAND inwardly resented and felt the insult in a manner which made itself plainly visible to her friends. To use Mr. STIGANT’s words, “She was never quite the same afterwards.” She had, however, so much strength of purpose, and such a sustained flow of spirits, that no one dreamed of any evil consequences, or thought that she would not speedily recover from the cruel stab which a professedly friendly hand had given to her. She was present at the launching of the Gambia, and appeared in excellent spirits, both there and subsequently. It seems, however, that there was an undercurrent of mortification and despair, growing slowly into the desperate resolve carried out last Saturday.
To attempt to moralize on such a tragedy, and its cause, would be a waste of words. The lesson is plain enough, and will not, we hope, be lost upon those who have most need to read it. We have but to tender our sympathy to our much respected fellow-citizen, Mr. STIGANT, and his family, and to assure him of the kindly and sympathetic feeling of the public. – Cape Argus.

THE LEGISLATURE.
The following lists gives the names of the members of Parliament in both Houses: -
LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.

EAST.

WEST.

S. CAWOOD

J. BARRY

J. C. CHASE

C. BARRY

W. FLEMING

F. BICCAD

R. GODLONTON

J. van der BYL

J. C. HOOLE

J. HIDDINGH

D. H. KENNELLY

G. de KORTE

- SCHOLTZ

M.L. NEETHLING

C. L. STRETCH

P. de ROUBAIZ

F. te WATER

W. de SMIDT

G. WOOD

H. VIGNE

 

H. WHITE

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY.

EAST.

WEST.

Albany. -

G. SLATER

Beaufort West. -

J. C. MOLTENO

 

C. J. GUSH

 

V. RICE

Albert. -

F. H. HOPLEY

Caledon. -

H. W. BREDA

 

P. J. de WET

 

Dirk van BREDA

Aliwal North. -

J. H. BROWN

Cape District. -

C. J. MANUEL

 

J. MERRIMAN

 

M. J. LOUW

Colesberg. -

N. H. THEUNISSEN

Capetown. -

W. PORTER

 

J. H. DISTIN

 

S. SOLOMON

     

P. J. STIGANT

     

J. T. EUSTACE.

Cradock. -

T. C. SCANLEN

Clanwilliam. -

S. SHAWE

 

P. R. BOTHA

 

H. N. van RHYN

East London. -

C. J. WOLLASTON

George. -

Hon BARRINGTON

 

J. S. WHRIGHT

 

G. W. B. WEHMEYER

Fort Beaufort. -

J. QUIN

Malmesbury. -

J. DAKITT

 

R. F. RORKE

 

A. G. H. van BREDA

Graaff-Reinet. -

J. F. ZIERVOGEL

Namaqualand. -

J. R. ROES

 

J. BURGERS

 

Vacant

Grahamstown. -

G. C. CLOUGH

Oudtshoorn. -

B.J. KEYTER

 

J. C. THOMPSON

 

G.H. SCHEEPERS

King Williamstown. -

C. SMITH

Paarl. -

J. J. PROCTOR

 

P. GOOLD

 

P. T. Pentz

Port Elizabeth. -

W. KNIGHT

Piquetberg. -

D. TENNANT

 

W. PEARSON

 

J. Z. HUMAN

Queenstown. -

S. LOXTON

Riversdale. -

T. D. BARRY

 

J. C. WARNER (?)

 

J. C. PRINCE

Richmond. -

P. J. A. WATERMEYER

Stellenbosch. -

Sir. C. BRAND

 

P. A. BRAND

 

H. S. NEETHLING

Somerset. -

R. M. BOWKER

Swellendam. -

J. MOODIE

 

J. A. DE WET

 

F. W. REITZ

Uitenhage. -

J. H. TENNANT

Victoria West. -

W. KINNEAR

 

R. AYLIFF

 

J. ADAMS

Victoria East. -

T. KING

Worcester. -

M. A. MEIRING

 

G. BROWN

 

J. H. de VILLIERS.

‘ADVOCATE’ TELEGRAM
CAPE TOWN,
Saturday, May 27, 1871.
“CELT” left on 25th April, and Madeira on the 2nd May; and has on board a large cargo for this port, and also the Bay.
THE CAPE ARGUS states that eleven days after leaving Southampton one of the crew sickened, and the following day was attacked by small-pox. The man has now so far recovered that he is considered convalescent.
THE “ROMAN” was sighted by the “Celt” on the 7th May.
PASSENGERS for Algoa Bay: -
Mr. and Mrs MURRAY and family,
Miss WILDBOARD,
Miss ELSDALE,
Bishop of Bloemfontein,
Mrs. WEBB and two children,
Mrs. HORNSBY,
Messrs. GROSBENDENER,
SHRODER,
JARVIS,
NEVILL,
CROTHER,
LORRIS,
CLARKE,
HYLDYARD,
FRAMES,
CHURCH,
MASTER,
SNOWDEN,
DAVIES,
Sergeant BRANDER,
Mrs. NENDELSOHN and two children.

DIAMOND FIELD.
(From Diamond News.)
ILLNESS OF THE PNIEL POSTMASTER. – We regret to say that Mr. MEYER, the Postmaster at Pniel, has been for some days confined to his room with a somewhat severe attack of partial paralysis. We sincerely wish him a speedy recovery.

O. J. TRUTER, ESQ., Landdrost of Pniel, has established a periodical Court at Du Toit’s Pan, where he will sit, we believe, twice a week. Inspector Donovan, with about twenty police, has also been stationed there. This judicious arrangement will, no doubt, lessen the number of petty thefts, to which, according to all accounts, Du Toit’s Pan, has been unpleasantly subject.

MR. BABE’S CANAL SCHEME. – Mr. BABE’s project for conveying water to Du Toit’s Pan and other diamondiferous farms in the neighbourhood, is one which is certain to commend itself to the public both here and in the colony. It is not intended, as stated by our local contemporary, to join the waters of the Vaal and Modder rivers by means of a canal, but to convey water to the farm from either one of the two abovenamed streams – as may, upon survey, appear most practicable. The plan conceived is based upon similar undertakings as carried out in California, and would consist in cutting a canal of such a size as would deliver at Du Toit’s a constant stream of about 36 inches in diameter. This, Mr. BABE estimates, could be done at the rate of about £100 per mile, the nearest distance from which the water could thus be obtained being about 22 miles. Mr. BABE, who is about proceeding to Du Toit’s, will upon arrival there, at once take steps to institute a survey, in which he will, we have no doubt, be heartily supported by the proprietors of the farm and the residents there. Upon ascertaining the best point from which to lead the water, Mr. BABE will at once issue a prospectus.

MR. THOM, the Brazilian diamond cutter. has arrived at Pniel.

FINDS.

PNIEL.

Spes Bona Company

1d

3½c

Do

1d

1½c

Do

1d

1¼c

Do

2d

1½c

Good Hope Company

1d

4c

Do

1d

2¼c

Do

2d

1½c

*

1d

3½c

Do

1d

1c

Do

1d

½c

Chas. JONES

1d

3½c

GREEN

1d

7c

MCINTYRE

1d

 

MOONLIGHT.

Union Diamond Co.

1d

5¼c

Do

1d

2¾c

do

1d

2½c

Do

1d

¾c

Do

1d

½c

Do

1d

½c

PEARCE

1d

2¼c

Do

1d

2½c

Do

1d

7c

Do

1d

1¼c

Do

1d

3½c

Jas. STRONG

5d

 

*

1d

20c

Do

1d

18c

Do

1d

17½c

Do

3d

 

O’TOOLE

1d

11¼c

Do

1d

3¾c

DELPORT

1d

13½c.

HEBRON.

Hondeklip Party

1d

7½c

Do

1d

1⅜c

Do

1d

¾c

Do

3d

1½c

CAWOOD’S HOPE.

*

1d

8½c

Do

1d

 

 DE BEER’S.

* 1d 20c.

DU TOIT’S PAN

* 1d 61c.

Those marked with star decline having names published.

HEBRON.

We acknowledge with thanks the following lists of finds from our own correspondent.

FINDS FROM 10th to 17th May.

JOOKS

1d

3½c

E. BUCKLEY

1d

1c

Oriental Company

1d

1¼c

DAVIES and DICKENSON

1d

6¼c

Do

1d

⅜c

Do

1d

1¼c

MAINE and Comp.

1d

1c

CAITHNESS

1d

6c

RAPER

1d

1⅜c

E. PETTY

1d

1c

SEDDERSTRUM and Company

1d

1c

BIDDULPH

4d

 

DONAHOE

1d

2c

Do

1d

1½c

*de SMIDT

1d

2½c

J. SCHUCH

1d

1½c

de JONGH

1d

2c

Do

1d

1c

FAUZER

1d

1c

PEARSON

1d

1¾c

DELL and BOWLES

1d

5c

HOLLAND

1d

5c

DONALDSON and RITCHIE

1d

3c

*Green diamond

1d

1½c

J. LAW

1d

2½c

Do

1d

1c

Do

2d

1⅛c

TAINTON

1d

4⅜c

Do

1d

4¾c

Do

1d

1c

E. DUGGAN

1d

3c

Forlorn Hope Company

1d

½c

W. ELS

1d

1¾c

Do

1d

1½c

THERON

1d

2½c

Do

1d

1⅝c

Do

1d

1⅞c

Do

1d

1⅜c

Do

1d

1c

Do

1d

1⅛c

Do

1d

2¾c

SCHEEPERS

1d

5¼c

Do

1d

1¾c

A. CORB

1d

1c

Do

1d

5¾c

CATO

1d

2¾c

Do

1d

1½c

W. WALL

1d

3c

CLINKSCALES

1d

2c

LAW

1d

3⅝c

GOODES

1d

5½c

Do

1d

1c

Do

2d

1¼c

D. SCHOLTZ

1d

1⅝c

Do

1d

1½c

HUTCHINSON

1d

2¼c.

 SPENCE’S.

P. SMITH

1d

8¾c

MINTER

1d

16½c

BRACUW

1d

8½c

Do

1d

4½c

D. MEYERS

1d

1½c

VORSTER’S.

FOSTER

1d

1½c

DONALDSON and DARNING

1d

2¾c

ROBINSON’S.

W. JONES

1d

3c

George THOM

1d

1c

Do

1d

1½c

We regret that, owing some unexplained cause, we have not yet received our usual list of finds from our esteemed correspondent at Du Toit’s Pan.

POSTSCRIPT.

THE DIAMOND FIELD did not come to hand this week.

BURGLARY. – Two white men have been apprehended on a charge of breaking into the store of Mr. O’GARA. Several articles were missed, and it was subsequently discovered that a short similar to some in stock belonging to Mr. O’GARA, had been offered for sale to a shopkeeper. The parties are still in prison.

CONCERT AT ALICE. – On Wednesday evening a Concert was given in the Courtroom, in aid of the Alice Public Gardens’ Fund. There were visitors from Fort Beaufort, Queenstown, and other places, some of whom had the mortification of not being able to obtain seats. The concert was declared a great success. We have received an account of it from an esteemed correspondent; but, on account of its length, we regret our space will not allow us to insert it.

GLORIOUS FINDS. – Mr. CAWOOD, son of Joseph CAWOOD, of Port Elizabeth, has left the Fields with a diamond of one hundred carats! No mistake about it either, but a hard, substantial fact. We hear that Mr. COSGROVE, from Cradock, has found two of ten carats together, and Mr. GAMES has also been tolerably successful. Dutoitspan, and the Moonlight Rush, are said to be first-class place for digging, far superior to any others. – Register.

THE KATBERG. – The Argus says Mr. FLETCHER, who has been for many years engaged in Government and other services as surveyor and engineer in Clanwilliam and Namaqualand, has , we understand, been appointed as Inspector of Roads or Engineer in connection with the Public Works Department for the Katberg Pass. We may state, for the information of our Frontier friends that Mr. FLETCHER is at once one of the most scientific and practical of the engineers who have been in the service of the Colony for many years past.

MR. LOXTON’S BILL for relieving unoccupied property from the payment of the House Tax, has been thrown out, on the second reading.

A CERTAIN CURE FOR WHITE SORE THROAT. – On the authority of persons who have tried the remedy and found it effectual, even in the case of small children, we state, that the leaves of the Aluin-hout, or Wild Palm, used as a gargle, three or four times a day, is an infallible remedy for White Sore Throat. The tree grows in abundance in this Province. – Cradock Register.

MR. GEORGE GRAHAM, an old resident at Fort England, died on Saturday. He loved in a house by himself, and was found in bed several hours after life must have been extinct. The deceased was a very eccentric character, and was commonly known under the sobriquet of “Old Geordie GRAHAM.” He had, during his long and eventful life, managed to become possessed of considerable landed property in this city, but it is said that he died without making a will, so that it is at present unknown to whom the property will revert. When found dead in bed he was underneath the bed clothes, but had his boots on. – STAR.

DIED, at Aloe Grove, Bongolo, (near Queenstown), the residence of his brother Elijah WIGGILL, on the 29th inst., - George WIGGILL, of Bram Bush, Winterberg, aged 55 years.
Friends at a distance will be good enough to accept this notice.
Queenstown, May 30, 1871.

Saturday, June 10, 1871

NOTICE.
List of Licences issued by the Distributor of Stamps at Stockenstrom during May, 1871: -
Hawkers Licence, £1 10s, to expire 31st December, 1871.
P. HOFFELDT, Ebenezer,
G. SHREINER, Hertzog.
Retail Shop Licence, £1 10s, to expire 31st December, 1871.
Jas. GREEN, jun., Balfour (near Grey Kerk.)
GG MEURANT, Dis. Stamps.
Stamp Office,
Eland’s Post, 1st June, 1871.

MISCELLANEOUS.

HEAVY HIDE. – Mr. NORTON bought an old bull on the market for 25s a few weeks ago, had it killed, gave the meat to the niggers, and sold the hide – which weighed 143lbs – for 35s.

SOME RUBIES forwarded from this colony to England, and which were found at the Diamond Fields, have been pronounced of superior quality.

ACCIDENT. – A young man named DISSELL, residing at Edendale in this division, met with an accident on Tuesday evening. He was in the act of jumping on to his wagon, which was laden with about 10,000 weight of wool, when his foot slipped, precipitating him under the wagon. The front wheels passed over his thighs. He was conveyed to the residence of Dr. de SMIDT, District Surgeon, and the wound examined. It was found that it was a superficial would, and that no bones were broken.
IN OUR LAST ISSUE we inserted a paragraph that Mr. RUSHBY, of this town, had received the annual prize medal from the Secretary of the National Association. Mr. COPELAND, the President, has written to the Eastern Star denying that Mr. RUSHBY has any connection with that society, or that he was at any time Secretary. We do not dispute Mr. COPELAND’s authority to make that assertion, but as the annual report of the National Association contains Mr. RUSHBY’s name as Secretary, were we not correct in styling him as such?

A NATIVE RESIDING at AINSLIE’s has been committed for trial for wilful murder, under the following circumstances: The lands of which he had charge were frequently trespassed upon by cattle belonging to natives in the neighbourhood; and he at last determined to watch. One morning while doing so he saw five native boys drive the cattle towards the river, and then seat themselves on the bank. They were sitting quietly when the prisoner came up to them, saying he had them now and would pay them out. Four of the five boys immediately jumped into the river and swam through, the fifth remaining behind as he was unable to swim. The accused took hold of the little fellow, and threatened to take his life, at the same time throwing him into the water. The boy at once disappeared and was drowned, the body not being recovered for about eight days after. The prisoner says that he jumped in after the boy and tried to save him, but the witnesses deny this.

A MEMORIAL has been numerously signed by the inhabitants of Beaufort West, praying the Governor to remove Capt. TINLEY, the magistrate there.

A COOL THEFT. – On Friday evening about dusk, Mr. Wm. GARNER, of Middledrift, rode up to Mr. ROBERTSON’s residence, in the German Village, and hooking the bridle of his horse to the post he entered the dwelling, and having remained there about half an hour he left, but to his astonishment his saddle (a new one) had been “jumped.” Up to the present there is no trace of the theft.

QUEEN’S TOWN REPRESENTATIVE. – We are authorised to state, on undoubted authority, that Mr. W. S. RIDGWAY will be put in nomination for the seat in the Lower House lately occupued by Mr. DARNELL, and that he will stand a contest, if necessary. – Representative.

DEATH OF DR. HOUSLEY. – We very much regret to hear that the Celt brought news of the death of Dr. HOUSLEY, formerly of Port Elizabeth, which sad event took place on the 14th April.

FATAL ACCIDENT. – Whilst Mr. Samuel SIMPSON of the Breakwater tao, was out dribing near the Rawson Bridge on Sunday last, he was thrown from his cart and received very severe injuries in the fall. He was brought into town, and after lingering four days, died on Wednesday last. – Telegraph.

THE WRECK AT QUOIN POINT. – 155 BODIES WASHED UP. – Messrs. BARRY and NEPHEW received a telegram from Bredasdorp on Thursday morning, stating that the wreck of the French ship was near Quoin Point, and that debris was washing up along the coast for some distance. Up to Wednesday afternoon, 155 bodies had been washed up, and had been buried. These consisted of 140 colored and 15 white men. Argus.

THE LAST NUMBER of the Zingari contains one of the best cartoons that has yet appeared. Mr. MOLTENO, as the champion of Responsible Government, armed with an immense extinguisher, is attempting to put out the Constitution! In a future number we shall probably see what came of the attempt.

Saturday, June 17, 1871

TEMPERANCE HOTEL,
Lower end of Campbell Street
N. ELLIOT
Still continues to carry on the business of Blacksmith and Farrier, and also Hotel Keeping.
N.B. begs to thank his friends and the public generally for their past patronage and hopes they will continue to favour him wish a share of the same.

THE COMMERCIAL HOTEL, Adelaide,
(Late HENNEMEYER’s)
Is replete with every comfort for Travellers.
M. MATTIG.

JOHN MACGILVREY, Builder, Cabinet maker, Upholsterer, and Undertaker – Plans and specifications supplied.
J. MCGILVREY begs to intimate that he conducts Funerals at prices greatly below those usually charged by other Undertakers in Town.
All kinds of jobbing done. Orders from town or country carefully attended to.
In order to complete his Undertaking Establishment, J. McG. Has constructed to order regardless of cost, a Funeral Hearse with suitable appointments.

The man who was committed for trial on a charge of wilful murder (concerning which we inserted a paragraph in our last issue) has been, we understand, in the employ of Mr. AINSLIE for over twenty years. His character during that time, according to his master, has been that of a steady, sober, industrious and honest servant, not generally excitable. The version we gave last week was from the evidence of the boys given at the examination. The statement of the accused is materially different. He says that although frequently annoyed by cattle trespassing on his land, he never watched to catch the herds. On this occasion he had gone to his work as usual, and while so employed he noticed cattle among his mealies. He drive them out of the land and through the river. On returning he discovered the five boys sitting on the bank. He asked them why they sat there and allowed the cattle to go in the land. The four immediately jumped into the river and swam through to the other side. He then went up to the fifth, took hold of him by the hand, and was leading him away, when he broke loose and followed the example of the others. The accused immediately ran to where the boy had jumped in, and seeing that he was drowning, called out to the boys on the opposite side to jump in and save their companion, as he (the accused) could not swim. They refused. He therefore jumped into the water, and took hold of the boy, who at once clung to his neck. Both sank, and, while under water, became separated. On rising to the surface the man made for terra firma in order to save his own life, as he was unable to swim. The boy, however, disappeared and was drowned. Mr. AINSLIE has informed is that the man was as much concerned about the unfortunate affair as the parents of the boy.

MISCELLANEOUS.

DIAMOND FIELDS. – A diamond of 93c is reported from Dutoits; and another of bright red colour, valued at £8,000; A gem of 45c, valued at £4,000, found by Gray & Chapman at Gong-Gong.  The chief finds reported for week ending May 27 are:

*

one of

35 carats

BEARD,

one of

21½c

DEAN,

one of

16¼c

*

one of

15c

HARRIS,

one of

13½c

DANIEL,

one of

1½c.

The finds appear to have been numerous, but small. A beautiful diamond of 21½c found by ALLISTON & Co. WALKINGS, one of 49¼c. Mr. Benj. PAXTON has been run over by a heavily laden cart, and killed on the spot.

THE BLOEMHOF ARBITRATION is still sitting. The Transvaalers are now giving their evidence, as it is called, in support of their claims.

PROSPECTING AT PNIEL. – It may not be generally known that about two miles down the river, on the Pniel side, is a valley the soil of which appears precisely similar to that at Du Toit’s Pan. The stratum is of considerable depth, as shown by a water-cut gully in the centre. At the upper end, the valley expands into a large flat, the soil of which will, in all probability, prove to be of the same character. It appears so promising a place that the Prospecting Party will forthwith be moved to the spot. Should it prove equally diamondiferous with Du Toit’s Pan, the advantage of contiguity with the river would cause an unexampled rush to the spot.

THE STATE OF THE CAMPS at Dutoitspan, Bultfontein and surroundings is, according to all accounts, shocking. Of water there is scarcely any – not even enough to drink, much less for household purposes and baths. Men go round from tent to tent begging a drink of water. The soil is little else than sand, and it is of that whitish colour which is so painful, for the eyes to be continually resting upon. When the wind blows the sand fills eyes, mouth, nose, and ears.

‘ADVOCATE’ TELEGRAM.
Advocate Office,
Thursday, June 15, 1871.
CAMBRIAN arrived at noon.
Is quarantine.
Four cases of small-pox – last said to be a week ago.
Passengers:
First Class. – Messrs. DILLON,
H. BENJAMIN,
Lord HEREFORD,
Mr. PENNY,
Mr. JOCKSON,
Mr. DEFORMENTON,
Mr. FRANDERFOO,
Mr. CHAPMAN,
Mr. SHERONI and man servant,
Mr. DREYFUS,
Miss. BENNETT,
Mr. MICHELL.
Second Class. – Mrs. DOUGLAS and
Missis DOUGLAS,
Messrs. D. D. NONSONKDTWODD,
OSTHOMEAL,
HOWELL,
ASSING,
WRIGHT,
ADAMS,
HARRIS,
LARKE,
CHAMBERLAIN, and
ROBERTS.
BRITON arrived home as Cambrian was leaving.

Saturday, June 24, 1871

MISCELLANEOUS.

THE WATCHMAN hears on good authority that the most influential inhabitants of Fort Beaufort have petitioned his Excellency the Governor for the removal of the Resident Magistrate of Fort Beaufort.

PROGRESS. – The second number of the Vrystaat Burgher has appeared in a greatly improved form. In addition to a stock of type, it has been enlarged to twenty-four columns.

THE ZINGARI. – The portrait gallery of this comic journal is becoming interesting. Already three members have figured in it, viz. Messrs. MOLTENO, MERRIMAN, and LOXTON. A few copies of 2 and 3 may be had at the Advocate office, where subscriptions are received.

POST-MORTEM. – On Monday the District Surgeon was sent for from Blinkwater to make a post mortem on a Hottentot woman, whose death it was supposed was caused under suspicious circumstances. The result of the examination is, we believe, that death is attributable to disease of the heart.

ACCIDENT. – On Friday night last a man named LONG, while in a state of intoxication, was proceeding along below the water furrow, when he fell down an embankment, breaking the thigh bone. It was not until next morning that he was discovered lying in a very precarious predicament. The District Surgeon, with his usual alacrity, was promptly in attendance. He had the unfortunate man removed to the gaol hospital, where the broken limb is progressing favorably.

IT IS EXPECTED that the Dean of Cape Town will be chosen to the Bishopric of Graham’s Town.

ANOTHER VICTIM TO FEVER. – We regret to see Mr. Alexander MCCORKINDALE’s death recorded. He died of fever at the island of Inyack, near Delagoa Bay.

EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHS of the S.S. GAMBIA, as she lies stranded on the rocks at the foot of Kemp-street, have been taken by Mr. J. E. BRUTON, who has sent copies to the Graphic.

DEATH OF MR. DANIEL THOMPSON. – We deeply regret to have to record the death of MR. Daniel THOMPSON, of this town, which sad event took placw at Du Toit’s Pan on the 7th instant. – Watchman.

AS OUR ESTEEMED Civil Commissioner will now shortly leave for Basutoland to assume the duties of High Commissioner’s Agent there, we understand that Mr. COLE has been appointed acting C.C. and R.M. until Mr. GRIFFITH’s successor arrives. – Gazette.

THAT MR. W. B. CHALMERS is to succeed Mr. GRIFFITH as Civil Commissioner and Resident Magistrate of King William’s Town appears to be quite a settled thing. Some little disappointment is felt that Mr. JUDGE, of Queen’s Town is not coming. – Ibid.

WAGON ACCIDENT. – A wagon accident is reported from Van Staden’s. From what we can gather, the driver fell from a wagon going from LIPPERT & Co.’s wool-wash, and the wheels went over him, inflicting such injuries that there was no hope for his recovery. It is a wonder that the general carelessness of drivers in this country is not punished by more accidents. In England attempts of this kind of suicide are severely punished by the law. – Uitenhage Times.

WHO’S TO BLAME. – Neither the Diamond News nor Diamond Fields has put in an appearance this week. The latter journal has only been received one since its resuscitation. We hope the Editors, and printers have not been attracted by the glittering accounts from Du Toit’s Pan, and left the papers to take care of themselves.

THE SOMERSET COURANT SAYS: - A Dispute! – As the inhabitants of Somerset and Bedford are accustomed to see or hear disputes in the Magistrate’s Court, we shall give a few extracts from the report of a scene which happened in Fort Beaufort a few days ago. There is not much in it from beginning to end, but it will serve to show how they manage affairs in Beaufort, instead of going decently to work like sensible people and doing their business in a business-like manner. It appears there was an adjourned meeting in the Insolvent Estate of one R. BOVEY, at which claims where supposed to be filed. When all concerned were comfortably seated the performance was opened thus (describing the affair as reported in the Advocate.)

SCARCITY OF WATER AT DU TOIT’S PAN. – We are constantly reading and hearing of the great scarcity of water at Du Toit’s Pan. This state of things need not last long if, according to an advertisement in our paper, a company, formed for the purpose, engage the services of Mr. C. M. DAVIS of Colesberg, whose invention, would supply any quantity of water to Du Toit’s Pan, at not further cost than that of erecting the necessary apparatus. As we have said before, Mr. DAVIS invention is a truly marvellous one, and the grandness of it is that then once the machinery is set going it needs no attention, but works on by itself, giving a continuous and plentiful supply of water night and day. No steam, no wind, no horsepower, no manual labour is required. Mr. BABE could never come up to this perfection, although Yankees profess to “lick all creation.” Mr. DAVIS’ plan would be far more preferable and cost much less than Mr. BABE’s of either cutting a canal or lying down iron rivers.

SALE OF FARMS AT BEDFORD. – The properties recently advertised, in the estate of C. B. TROLLIPE, were sold at Bedford on Thursday the 15th inst., Mr. C. W. HUTTON Auctioneer. The farm “Botman’s Gat,” not quite 3,400 morgen in extent, was knocked down, after some keen competition, to Mr. Barend Jacobus de KLERK for £3,425. The other farm “Klipfontein,” although some 750 morgen smaller in extent than “Botman’s Gat,” fetched a higher price, Mr. P. W. J. BOUWER being the purchaser at £3,500. This is at the rate of about 27s per morgen, not reckoning expenses of sale, duty, and transfer. The prices realised in both cases are considered highly satisfactory, especially to the mortgagees, and a general opinion has been expressed that the turning point in the fortunes of the farming interest had at length been reached.

DIAMOND FIELDS.
(From Watchman)
A TERRIBLE gale and dust storm has taken place at Pniel and Klip Drift.

WITHIN the past three months no less than 1,500 diamonds have been registered in the proprietor’s book as having been reported to him at Du Toit’s Pan, and duty paid thereon.

AT DU TOIT’S PAN large diamonds were found within the week; one 55, one 40, one 32 carats.

A MASONIC LODGE called the “Octahedron” has been formed at Klip Drift.

POPULATION OF THE FIELDS. – Some idea of the number of people at present on the Fields may be formed from the fact that the Postmaster of Klip Drift has on his books the names of 11,700 persons whose letters he is requested to forward to the different outstations. Of these 7,900 are at Du Toit’s Pan. The above list, of course, does not include Pniel or Klip Drift. We shall be, we think within the mark if we estimate every name thus registered as representing three persons – i. e. reckoning a white and black together. This would give a population at the various camps, of some, 35,000 souls.

SOUTH AFRICAN DIAMONDS AND THE EUROPEAN MARKET. – We had the pleasure, yesterday of inspecting a superb parcel of some two hundred odd diamonds, purchased by Mr. UNGER during the past ten days. One hundred of them were picked stones of excel at quality – the off-coloured of inferior stones being placed in a separate parcel. Mr. UNGER, quoting from his partners and correspondents in Hamburg, says that the quality of the parcels sent him by him have astonished everybody, and “that the stones have turned out equal to anything ever shipped from the Indies.

MR. JEPPE, Postmaster-General of the Transvaal has been on a visit to Klipdrift during the past week, for the purpose of inaugurating direct postal communication between that place and Potchefstroom, arrangements for which have been concluded with the Cape Town authorities.

THE HOPKINS DIAMOND. – The 55 carat diamond found by MR. HOPKINS, the American, at Du Toit’s Pan, this week, is a magnificent stone – amber tint, but perfect as to shape, and without speck or flaw. The manner of the find forms an instance of marvellous luck. Mr. HOPKINS had taken a walk to a spot about a mile and a quarter distant from the main camp, and was standing looking idly on the ground when he espied a small garnet in the sand. Stooping to pick it up he saw another, and then commenced scratching in the sand with a piece of hoop from which he happened to be carrying. Giving a somewhat deeper scoop than usual, just by a small bush, he turned out this beautiful 55 carat gem. His feelings can be better imagined than described.

HOPKINS & Co.,

No. 1

1d

7c

   

1d

1c

   

1d

8½c

   

4d

1½c

HOPKINS & Co.,

No. 2

1d

¾c

   

1d

¼c

J. L. RABE & Co.,

 

1d

1c

   

1d

½c

BABE & DUNN.

 

1d

¾c

   

1d

½c

HOPKINS,

 

1d

55c

*

 

1d

40c

*

 

1d

32c

BULTFONTEIN. -

*

1d

25c

Do

1d

15c

Do

1d

10c

CAWOOD’S HOPE. –

J. SCHOLTZ & Co,

1d

13¾c

 

1d

2½c

 

1d

2½c

SPADLING & MITCHELL,

1d

¾c

 

1d

1⅞c

 

1d

1¾c

 

1d

1¾c.

MARRIED. – At Balfour, division of Stockenstrom on Wednesday the 21st June, 1871, Edward Philip SOLOMON of Fort Beaufort, eldest son of Rev. Edward SOLOMON, Bedford, to Harriet Jane THOMSON, youngest daughter of the Rev. William R. THOMSON of Balfour

DIED. – At Diamondia, Vaal River, Diamond Fields, Orange Free State, on the 27th May, 1871. Henry James WINDELL, aged 17 years, youngest son of Mr. J. H. WINDELL, of Fort Beaufort, deeply regretted by a numerous circle of friends and relations.

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