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Grahamstown Journal 1891 12 December

Thursday 3 December 1891

NOTICE TO CREDITORS & DEBTORS
In the Estate of the late Cornelia Maria BEZUIDENHOUT, born VAN DER MERWE, formerly of Van der Merwe’s Kraal and since of the Transvaal.
All Persons interested in this Estate are requested to file their Claims with the Undersigned within six weeks from this date; and all Persons indebted thereto to pay their Debts to him within the same period.
G. WHITE
Executor Dative
Brak Kloof, Albany
Grahamstown, 2nd December 1891.

BIRTH on Tuesday Dec. 3rd, the wife of J.W. MONTJOIE of a daughter.

SIR T. SCANLEN
We regret to note among the names of the unfortunate shareholders who have had to make compromises with the liquidators of the Cape of Good Hope Bank, that Sir Thomas C. SCANLEN had to meet a demand of £7,500. Sir Thomas was also a shareholder in the Union Bank recently liquidated under authority of the Supreme Court. It appeared from a statement made to one of the judges on Friday that he had arranged to assign his estate to the Union Bank. Under the circumstances (says the Telegraph) the compromise suggested was ordered to stand over for confirmation until more was known in regard to Sir Thomas SCANLEN’s affairs.

SUDDEN DEATH FROM HEART DISEASE
Yesterday morning Mr. Joseph FAIRCLOTH, a gentleman between 60 and 70 years of age, residing in the neighbourhood of Trappe’s Valley, rode over to Trappe’s Valley station with the view of proceeding to Grahamstown by the “Stock Fair Train”. He had arrived at the station and stood conversing on unimportant topics with Mr. TARR and Mr. FORESTER, waiting till it was time to take seats in the cars. He had just remarked jocularly that there was a difference in age of 11 months between himself and one of the other gentlemen, when to their horror he gave a cry, threw up his arms and fell to the ground. He was at once attended to, but found to be quite dead. The sad occurrence was a great shock to all the farmers in the vicinity, by whom deceased was much respected.

SEQUEL TO A WEDDING PARTY
Mrs. W.B. STOKES has an enterprising and would be fashionable native servant girl, and the latter having been chosen as a bridesmaid in a recent location marriage, sent a note to Mr. D. KNIGHT’s store in her mistress’s name, ordering a pair of boots, No.6’s, for the ceremony. The fraud was soon detected, and P.C. GALVIN went out and scooped in the erring damsel, who was with the wedding party. This morning she sat in silken clothes and natty straw hat by the side of [Coor Ruiters] and ordinary “drunks” in the dock. The wedding party were present in large numbers to witness results.

Saturday 5 December 1891

KILLED BY LIGHTNING
A sad story comes from Potchefstroom. During a heavy thunderstorm there Mr. S. DE BEER was struck by lightning, and after lingering in a semi-unconscious state for several days, expired from the injuries received. What makes the fatality the more distressing is that Mr. DE BEER had only been married a month, of which time only a fortnight was spent with his bride. As soon as the accident happened Mrs. DE BEER was summoned, and she arrived at the scene just in time to see her husband expire.

FATAL ACCIDENT
A fatal accident which took place on Wednesday night between East London and the Kuku is reported by the Dispatch. Mr. ROLAND, who has been for some years schoolmaster with Mr. Cornelius ELS, was coming into town on a wagon for the purpose of purchasing goods, in view of his approaching marriage to a Cathcart lady. He was sitting on the box at the front of the wagon, which was loaded with wool. It was dark at the time, when ROLAND by some means fell off, and was crushed under the wheel and picked up dead.

FATAL ACCIDENT
At Worcester on Monday the wife of Johan BEHM, who was assisting her husband in carting wood, met with a very sad death. Trying to replace the bridle on the horse, the animal took fright, knocked her over, and killed her on the spot.

DEATH OF MR. J. WARREN
The Watchman learns from Mr. Alfred STEVENSON, who has arrived from Mashonaland, that Mr. Joshua WARREN, son of Mr. R. WARREN of Kei Road, died at Port Beira on the 19th ult, after four days’ illness. The cause of death was acute inflammation of the kidneys, brought on by fever. It will be some satisfactory [sic] to the parents of the deceased to know that every attention was paid to him during his illness by Dr. WILSON and others, and that he was buried in the cemetery at Beira in Christian fashion, the service being conducted by the Rev. Owen WATKINS, Wesleyan Missionary.

Thursday 10 December 1891

ASSAULT AT FORT BEAUFORT
A contemporary (not the local paper, which as usual does not know the news of the place) says that two brothers names JOHNSON were charged at Fort Beaufort with assaulting Frederick QUIN on Saturday week, and including sundry bruises and wounds, the result being that both were [muleted] in fines of £10 each, or in default the usual alternative. QUIN is brother to Wm. J. QUIN, of the Sanitary Board of Johannesburg, and formerly of the F.B. Advocate staff, and son of the late Hon. Jno. QUIN, M.L.A. for that district.

MURDER OF A LAD
A shocking murder has been discovered near Piquetberg. A white lad, Nicholas PRETORIUS, eleven years old, son of a local farmer, was found brutally murdered. Suspicion was cast upon an escaped convict named Arie AFRICANDER.

DEATH OF MR. R. COLDREY
The Cradock papers record the decease of Mr. Richard COLDREY, which took place on Saturday last. Mr. COLDREY had been suffering from an internal complaint, and an operation we understand was contemplated, though there appeared no element of danger to life in the case, but the disease it is now evident had sapped the strength of the patient, who grew weaker, and in spite of medical assiduity, gradually sank. He was only 49 years of age, and to all appearances had yet a long period of life before him. His death is a heavy loss, not only to the bereaved widow and family but to the community of Cradock, in which he was universally respected as one of the leading business men, a public-spirited citizen and Town Councillor, and a man of blameless character and beneficent heart.

Saturday 12 December 1891

SUDDEN DEATH
We are sorry to chronicle today the death of William CHOLWICH sen., of Sharon, near Seven Fountains. It appears from what we are able to learn that deceased, who was very feeble, was in the field reaping on Thursday forenoon. At midday he came to the house and complained of a pain about the region of the heart, but it was not thought to be anything serious, and the afternoon were away [sic]. At night he ate his supper much as usual, but later he was taken worse, and Mrs. CHOLWICH, who was alone with the exception of some little children, used such remedies as she had until about midnight, when he began to speak of the children by name, saying he wondered where Bill was (he is up Transvaal way) and was sorry he had let the other boy go to town. And so on, until about 2am on the 11th Dec. he turned over in what his wife thought was a faint, but the end had come, and the husband and father had passed away.

Tuesday 15 December 1891

SUICIDE
A man named ARNOLD, about 30 years of age, keeper of the new toll at the Six Mile Spruit near Pretoria, blew out his brains in a very determined manner on Wednesday. It appears he went into his bedroom, and sitting on the bed, placed a carbine between his legs, and fixing a string to the trigger, sent a bullet through his chin, and out by the back of his head. The deceased, who leaves a wife and three children, had been dismissed for being absent from duty.

OUR CRICKET COLUMN
MERCANTILE C.C. vs ST.ANDREW’S COLLEGE C.C.
This fixture came off on the City Lords last Saturday, and resulted in a crushing defeat for the Town Club. Batting first, the Mercantile failed to make any stand against the bowling of ATHERSTONE and CRONWRIGHT and were all out for the phenomenal total of 24. ATHERSTONE, with his medium-paced leg breaks, was most destructive, taking 7 wickets for only 9 runs, and CRONWRIGHT, with fast well-pitched over-hand deliveries, proved an able second. The College put on 105 for 7 wickets before the game was concluded, GRICE and WALKER being principally responsible for this. Both men batted freely and put on about 50 runs before a separation was effected by WALKER, who throughout was venturesome, being run out. The scores were as follows:-
MERCANTILE C.C.
J. MEADE b. CRONWRIGHT   2
H. WALLACE b. ATHERSTONE   0
E.G. BOOTH c. BARLOW b. ATHERSTONE   5
C. WALLACE c. AUSTIN b. ATHERSTONE   5
J.R. LAMB c. and b. ATHERSTONE   2
E. DIGGEDEN b. CRONWRIGHT   0
L.O. LLOYD b. CRONWRIGHT   0
H.O. DOLD b. ATHERSTONE   2
L.B. DOLD b. ATHERSTONE   5
J.A. PRITCHARD (sub) not out   0
D. DICKS (sub) b. ATHERSTONE   0
Byes 2, Leg byes 1   3
Total: 24
ST.ANDREW’S COLLEGE C.C.
Mr. WEBB b. H. WALLACE   3
[H.] HUTCHEONS b. H. WALLACE   3
W. GRICE b. C. WALLACE   40
J. WALKER run out   26
E. ATHERSTONE c. MEADE b. H. WALLACE   14
A. BARLOW not out   8
J. BENNETT c. MEADE b. H. WALLACE   2
E. DOUGLASS c. L.B. DOLD b. H. WALLACE   1
Byes 7, Leg byes 1   8
Total for 7 wickets: 105
A. CRONWRIGHT, G. ATHERSTONE and H.A. AUSTIN to bat.

Saturday 19 December 1891

DEATH OF MRS. SOLOMON
We regret to hear of the death of Mrs. SOLOMON, relict of the late Rev. Edward SOLOMON, for many years pastor of the Independent Church, Bedford. The deceased lady, who had been ailing for some time, died last Friday morning at Capetown, where she, with her youngest daughter, had resided for some time. Mrs. SOLOMON was the mother of Mr. Justice SOLOMON, Advocate SOLOMON and Mr. Attorney Edward SOLOMON of Kingwilliamstown.

DEATH AT MOLTENO
The sudden death is announced at Molteno on Friday last of Mr. DOVER, the contractor for the building of the [new] mills there. It appears that Mr. DOVER, who was consumptive and had recently broken a blood-vessel, proceeded last week to Kingwilliamstown by train, and having executed his business, returned by the day train to Molteno on Friday, death ensuing an hour or two after arrival there. Drs. INNES and WEAKLEY were in attendance, but their aid was unavailing.

DEATH THROUGH DRINK
Mr. BUDLER’s death at the Central Bar, Colesberg, was sudden, but the cause was only too clear. About a fortnight ago he arrived in Colesberg as agent for the Star Life Assurance Company. BUDLER drank hard. The colonial manager of the Society arriving in Colesberg, and finding Mr. BUDLER on the spree, at once cancelled his appointment. BUDLER continued to drink but ate nothing, became weaker, lay down on a sofa in the hotel, and died. Everyone (remarks the Telegraph) must feel regret at the termination of a life that might have been useful.

SUICIDE OF MR. J.H. BOYES
The Barberton Herald of the 4th inst reports the death of Mr. BOYES, a sportsman well known to almost all Barbertonians. It appears that deceased was for some time in Delagoa Bay without employment. He has frequently written home to his relatives in Port Elizabeth, and obtained pecuniary assistance from there, but his last attempt to obtain help being refused, so preyed on his mind that he remarked to more than one in Lorenzo Marques that he would shoot himself. At six o’clock on Saturday morning last it was reported in the Bay that he had committed suicide, and shortly after that time our informant, with some others, found him lying in one of the goods sheds near the jetty, with part of his head blown off, and his gun along side of him. His two favourite pointer dogs were found close to him, both had their collars taken off and their throats cut, and were evidently killed by him previous to shooting himself. A post mortem examination was held at 9:30 on Saturday morning and he was buried the same day. A watch and chain, ring and pocket-book were found upon him.

Tuesday 22 December 1891

BIRTH at Fort Beaufort on the 8th December 1891, the wife of Rev. T.W. POCOCK of a daughter.

DUNCAN – SHAW
At Capetown, on 14th Dec 1891, by the Rev. W. Smith Foggitt, Wesleyan Minister, Robert, eldest son of Capt. R. DUNCAN, of Forest Gate, England, to Mary Winifred, daughter of William B. SHAW Esq., of Capetown.

DEPARTED THIS LIFE at the Albany General Hospital on the 22nd Dec 1891, Ebenezer Con WRIGHT, aged 59 years 3 months and 8 days.
“When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall ye also appear with Him in glory.”
Mrs. Cron WRIGHT and family desire to tender their sincere thanks to Dr. Edwin ATHERSTONE, Mr. MACROBERTS, Mr. John WEBB and the numerous friends who have assisted them in their sad affliction.
The Funeral of Mr. Ebenezer Cron WRIGHT will leave the Albany Hospital tomorrow (Wednesday) morning at 8 o’clock. All friends are invited to attend.

OBITUARY NOTICES
Mr. E.C. WRIGHT
It is our painful duty to announce the death of Mr. E.C. WRIGHT, which sad event occurred at the Albany Hospital, whither deceased was some little time ago conveyed for treatment. The late Mr. WRIGHT was a brother of our townsman Mr. G.G. WRIGHT, and numbered scores of friends in this town and district. In former years he controlled a large kurveying business, previous to which he had been connected with the business of Mr. N. BIRKENRUTH of this city. He relinquished kurveying, and afterwards farmed in various parts of the country, notably in Lower Albany, where he brought many scientific improvements to his aid. He had the honour for some years of representing Lower Albany in the Legislative Assembly, where his actions were received with general favour. He had been ailing for some time before his decease, which will nevertheless come as a great shock to his many friends. Our sincere sympathies are with the bereaved family.
REV. FATHER TROY
The sad news has also come to hand that our former townsman Rev. Jno. TROY has passed away at Queenstown. The deceased priest was so thoroughly and so long identified with Grahamstown, where everyone knew him, that his untimely death will cause widespread grief. In addition to being a zealous priest, he was an expert cricketer, and St.Aidan’s owes much of its “form” to his tuition. Deceased was born at Wicklow in Ireland, and came out to St.Aidan’s as a youth, where he studied until he had passed his matriculation examination. He then returned to Ireland, and after continuing his studies at the Missionary College in Dublin, was ordained priest and returned to this city, where his earnestness, his sympathetic genuine nature and his uniform kindness endeared him to the whole community. His useful career was, however, to be cut short by consumption, and, though he sought health in all the various climates of this colony, the disease made rapid progress, and when he recently returned to Grahamstown his friends were shocked to note how reduced he had become. We understand that at 7 o’clock tomorrow morning a memorial service will be conducted by the Right Rev. Bishop RICARDS in St.Patrick’s.

Thursday 24 December 1891

MARRIED at Sandflats on Dec. 14, by the Rev. W. Turpin, Charles Matthias, son of the late Mr. Thomas BRUTON, to Katie Delphine, daughter of Mr. William CHALMERS.

WEDDING BELLS
Monday December 14th was quite a lively day for the quiet people of Paterson (Sandflats) when Charles Matthias, son of the late Thomas BRUTON, was joined in the holy bonds of matrimony to Katie Delphine, daughter of Mr. William CHALMERS, formerly of Port Elizabeth. Rev. W. TURPIN of Grahamstown tied the nuptial knot. A very large congregation of relatives and friends were at All Saints Church to witness the pleasing ceremony. The bride, who looked very lovely, was attired in an extremely pretty travelling costume of pale green Pongee silk trimmed elaborately with white ribbon, and bouquet to match. She was attended by two charming bridesmaids in the persons of Miss Ada BRUTON (sister of the bridegroom) and Miss Sophie ROWE. Miss BRUTON wore a white nainsook dress and black lace hat with pink roses, and Miss ROWE was dressed in cream muslin and wore a white hat, both young ladies looking exceedingly beautiful. Owing to the absence of the bride’s father she was given away at the Altar by Mr. Robert FOWLER, who did his part splendidly. The bridegroom was attended by Messrs. F.W.G. RAND and C. ROWE, who performed their subsidiary part to entire satisfaction. After the service the merry party adjourned to the residence of the bridegroom’s mother, Mrs. BRUTON sen., where a sumptuous luncheon awaited them. The health of the happy couple was drunk by a large number of well-wishers, and capital speeches were made. Shortly after three o’clock Mr. and Mrs. Charles BRUTON were accompanied to the Railway Station by a large number of the guests, who went to see them off on their honeymoon tour to Coerney, amid showers of rice and old boots. We wish them both every happiness and prosperity in their new career. The presents were both numerous and costly. – Communicated.

WEDDING AT COMMEMORATION
Yesterday morning at about 9 o’clock Commemoration Church witnessed a very pretty wedding, which resulted in the joining together in holy matrimony of our townsman Mr. Fred. J. ABBOTT, son of Mr. J.W. ABBOTT, and Miss Ida Emily ESTMENT, daughter of Mrs. H. DAVIES. The ceremony was fixed at an early hour in order to enable the happy couple to catch the first train for Port Elizabeth, but notwithstanding the earliness of the hour a large congregation of friends and wellwishers had assembled to assist at the ceremony. Rev. H. COTTON was the officiating minister. The bride, who was of course the central figure, looked sweetly pretty in her elegant cream merveilleux satin (put together, we may mention, at the Universals’). She wore the orthodox wreath and orange blossoms. Her bridesmaid was Miss Gertie BAKER, and her step-father Mr. H. DAVIES gave her away in due form. Mr. Arthur ABBOTT (of Manicaland) noted a brother’s part to perfection, sustaining the rather trying role of best man with consummate coolness and presence of mind. Mr. T.E. SPEED, the Organist of the Church, was at his magnificent instrument, and his rendering of the “Wedding March” was one of the features of the ceremony. Immediately after the conclusion the whole party, including guests whose name was legion, adjourned to the residence of Mr. DAVIES, where Mr. Archie BEADLE, having been given carte blanche, had arranged a breakfast that would have tempted even Lord Randy’s Amphitryonic palate. Shortly after the train left for Port Elizabeth, and Mr. and Mrs. F.J. ABBOTT were on board, fairly started on their honeymoon. They leave here attended by numberless good wishes for an exceedingly happy married life, and though rather late in the day, we would add our own heartfelt congratulations and good wishes.
The presents may (with more truth perhaps than usual) be summarised as “numerous and costly”. We say summarised, as a summary is all that can be attempted in describing the 300 or more valuable and handsome articles on the list. The Commemoration Choir of course gave a handsome one, and others came from Kimberley, Johannesburg, Natal, Vryburg and other places. From pearls and diamonds (the extremes of the ornamental) the presents ranged to blankets (the extreme of usefulness).

Tuesday 29 December 1891

SUDDEN DEATH
The Register learns that Mr. Croydon DISTIN (son of Mr. J.S. DISTIN of Tafelberg Hall) has died suddenly.

Thursday 31 December 1891

DIED on the morning of the 24th December, at the residence of his father, Croydon DISTIN, the second son of John S. and Selina DISTIN.

LOST IN THE BUSH
Pierce BRENNAN, a young man who went out of his mind while in Mashonaland, through being lost in the bush, was sent from the Vryburg gaol hospital to the lunatic asylum at Grahamstown on Wednesday last, in charge of two keepers. The Chartered Company have borne all expenses since his malady began.

FUNERAL NOTICE
The Funeral of the late Mr. William WEBSTER will leave the residence of Mr. TOMLINSON sen., Bathurst-st, tomorrow (Friday) afternoon at 4 o’clock. All friends respectfully invited to attend.

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